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CITY OF SOMERVILLE 



MASSACHUSETTS 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



1919 



With Mayor's Inaugural Address 
Delivered January 5, 1920 




SOMERVILLE PRESS PRINT 
1920 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 

DELIVERED BY 

Mayor Charles W. Eldridge 

MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 1920 



Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen : 

For the first time in the history of Somerville its Govern- 
ment is being inaugurated for a biennial term. In the natural 
course of events we shall be associated for two years in the 
management of our city, and our responsibilities are the great- 
er because of the extended service which we are to render. The 
amendment to our charter making the government a continu- 
ing body for a two-year term will bring about a financial sav- 
ing to the city every alternate year and will, I believe, result 
in a more efficient administration. There will not be at the 
close of every year the distraction caused by a political cam- 
paign, and to my mind the mutual understanding between the 
Mayor and the Board of Aldermen will be strengthened with 
a consequent increase of co-operation. 

Each year of my term as mayor I have dwelt on co-opera- 
tion as one of the essential factors in good government. For 
two years it has been my privilege to work in harmony 
with the Board of Aldermen, and I confidently believe that the 
next two years will be marked by even closer co-operation. Our 
interests are the same. We are all chosen to give the very best 
that is in us to the service of the city, and it should not be 
difficult for men animated by a single purpose to agree on es- 
sential policies of government. Let us frankly talk over all 
differences of opinion that may arise. The City of Somerville 
has grown to be an enormous business, and the best results 
cannot be achieved for our people if the spirit of co-operation 
is absent in any part of the organization. 



4: ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The mayor's office will be always open to you. I shall 
strive to be considerate and broad-minded, and I am sure that 
you will be equally so. The affairs of the city will continue 
to be handled in a practical, business-like way, giving to the 
citizens full value for every dollar received, demanding from 
all city employees efficiency and economy, humanized by 
courtesy. Without courtesy no business can flourish, and in the 
public service courtesy should be the universal rule. It 
smooths over many difficult places and makes possible the 
consideration and service which every citizen has the right 
to demand. 

During the two years of my administration up to the close 
of business on December 31, 1919, the funded debt of the city 
has been reduced by |448,000. Including |35,000 maturing 
January 1, 1920, this reduction amounts to $483,000, of which 
f231,500 was paid during the past year. The borrowing ca- 
pacity of the city has been increased to |837,719. With the 
co-operation of the boards of aldermen of the last two years 
the borrowing of money for five year periods has been avoid- 
ed, and I urge you to continue the policy of "pay-as-you-go." 
We have begun again the improvements which were halted 
by the war, and last year i|140,000 was spent in the construction 
of streets, nearly 70,000 square yards of paving being laid. 
I am confident that each year we can extend the improvement 
of our highways without again having recourse to the ex- 
pensive and unsatisfactory method of short term borrowing. 

A statement prepared by the Auditor of the financial condi- 
tion of the city on January 1, 1920, will be printed as a part of 
this address. 

Our schools continue to have the first place in our thoughts 
because there is no more vital problem before us than the 
proper training of the youth, who in a few short years will take 
our places and the places of all the men and women who make 
up our city. The immediate direction of the schools rests with 
the School Committee, but we must all do our part to make them 
effective as to education and as to citizenship. We want our 
boys and girls equipped for the battle of life with all the 
training we can give them, and we want them inspired by pa- 
triotism, growing into young manhood and womanhood 100 
per cent. American. One great problem immediately before us 
is the question of school accommodations, and the recommenda- 



MAYOR^S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 5 

tions of the School Committee must be carefully weighed. A 
very large sum has been requested for new and enlarged build- 
ings, and it is absolutely necessary that the right course be 
taken to meet present requirements and future needs. 

The Boys' Vocational School is to undertake the training 
of disabled soldiers, and surely every citizen of Somerville 
will approve whatever expense may be required to better the 
condition of those brave men who, having performed nobly their 
patriotic duty, have returned to us suffering from the effects of 
war. 

For reasons of economy and efficiency I recommend the 
complete motorization of the Fire Department. By this means 
we shall secure better protection of life and property along 
with economy in maintenance. Economy in this department 
is more than ever necessary, because of the large increase in 
fixed expenses caused by the adoption of the two-platoon sys- 
tem by the voters at the state election. 

At my suggestion the Mayor of Medford has joined with 
me in presenting a bill to the legislature to straighten the 
boundary line between the cities of Somerville and Medford, 
and I ask your interest and help to bring about this result. 
The present course of this boundary creates conditions which 
are little short of ridiculous, and I believe that a friendly agree- 
ment may be reached fair to both cities. The same condition 
to a lesser extent applies to the line between Canibridge and 
Somerville, and this also should be taken under consideration. 

As there will not be another inauguration in Somerville 
until 1922 I call your attention at this time to the approach- 
ing fiftieth anniversary of the city. Somerville was in- 
corporated as a city on April 14, 1871, and the first 
city government was inaugurated in January, 1872. Since 
that time our city has increased in population from sixteen 
thousand to over ninety thousand and in valuation from twen- 
ty-two million, to over eighty-seven million. It may be deemed 
fitting to celebrate the golden anniversary in 1921, and I com- 
mend this to your consideration. 

While not the most pressing need at the present time, there 
should be constructed in the near future a new city hall suita- 
ble to the dignity and size of the City of Somerville. Built in 
1852 and originally designed and used for a school building, 



6 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

the present structure has been repaired, remodelled and en- 
larged in a vain effort to keep pace with the growth of the 
city, and further extensions are impracticable. The cost of re- 
pairs on the old building increases annually, and none of the 
departments has the necessary amount of space. Under these 
conditions business of the city cannot be transacted to the best 
advantage, and citizens as well as officials and employees are 
inconvenienced. 

The civic survey now being completed under the auspices 
of the Federation for Social Service will give to Somerville the 
first listing of all its resources and conditions. This survey 
will not only be of practical assistance in the development of 
our city, but it also brings to Somerville the prestige of being 
the first New England city to undertake and complete such a 
valuable work. 

The national census taken every tenth year is now being 
carried on, and I ask for the hearty co-operation of our people 
with the federal agents employed in this task. 

In common with all other municipalities Somerville feels 
the effect of the high cost of living, and this is reflected in the 
general increase of salaries and wages of city employees. An 
ordinar}^ rate of increase was not sufficient to maintain the 
standard of living, and I am confident that the people of Somer- 
ville wish their employees to live as American citizens should 
live, properly fed, properly housed and able to give their chil- 
dren their share of the benefits of education, culture and hap- 
piness which abound under the American Flag. Many of these 
increases were provided for last year. The school teachers will 
be cared for in a special budget which I shall submit to you. 
There must come a time when the limit of salaries and wages 
will be reached, and in the meantime I shall earnestly endeavor 
to meet each condition on its merits, dealing fairly with the 
tax payers, with justice to the employees. 

We recall with deep satisfaction the splendid service of our 
State Guard companies during the riots and the subsequent pe- 
riod of protection of the City of Boston. In doing this work 
for our neighboring city the State Guard protected Somer- 
ville and perhaps saved us from a reign of terror which the 
mind can scarcely conceive. 



mayor's inaugural address. 7 

Gentlemen of the Board, I would not be doing my full 
duty as the chief executive of our city if I did not speak 
plainly on this occasion of our grave responsibility in connec- 
tion with the unrest and discontent which now seem to be 
rampant throughout our country. The aftermath of the war 
with its readjustment of social and industrial conditions, its 
confusion, its great material gains and its equally great losses, 
has given an opportunity to those who would wreck our gov- 
ernment and destroy the rule of law and order on which our 
country is founded and under which it has grown great and 
prosperous. The evil of anarchy cannot be exaggerated. 

The latest figures show that Somerville had 6,560 men in 
the World War, that 178 were wounded, 123 died on the battle 
field or in camp, and 50 of our own boys won distinguished 
honors. Our city will ever cherish this record of patriotism 
and will express its gratitude in a permanent and appropriate 
memorial. The work of our returning service men is not yet 
done, for they are a tower of strength in preserving at home the 
principles for which they fought abroad. The peril of the Ked 
Flag is at our doors. Already the American Legion is fore 
most in the fight for true Americanism — Americanism as it was 
known in our Army and Navy, including men of every class, 
of every station, of every religion and almost every nationality, 
but all devoted to liberty and law, willing to sacrifice and to die 
if need be, that eternal right and justice might prevail. 

I earnestly urge that every ex-service man become a mem- 
ber of the American Legion, so that the Somerville Post may be 
among the largest and best in the country and our citizens may 
have the advantage of its strong devotion to American prin- 
ciples. Such an influence was exerted by the Grand Army 
of the Kepublic during the reconstruction period following 
the Civil War, and although its ranks are thinned and its 
surviving members are nearing the end of the span of life, 
America has no patriots more brave and true than the veterans 
of 1861-1865. 

Europe is seething with Bolshevism, but we have no 
place here for any man or woman who does not believe in the 
Republic founded by Washington and Jefferson, preserved by 
Lincoln and Grant and maintained in the fullness of its strength 



8 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

by the vast army and navy which comprised the best of our 
youth in the World War. There can be no excuse for. further 
compromise with the lawless aliens who seek to destroy our 
American institutions. They should be made to observe a decent 
respect for the country which has sheltered them, or they 
should be driven from our shores. Every immigrant should be 
required within a stated time, and not too long a time at that, 
to learn our language and to become naturalized; failing to 
meet these requirements — send him back where he belongs. 

We have no doubt of the ultimate triumph of the prin- 
ciples in which all loyal Americans devoutly believe; yet, in 
this land of liberty and justice, of equal opportunity, we must 
be ever on our guard to see that the square deal we stand for 
is given alike to all. There is room here for only one flag. 
Relying with God's grace on the love of liberty and obedience 
to law of the American people, we shall dwell in security and 
peace beneath the folds of the Stars and Stripes. 

*i^ ?l^ ^c ^|S 

''Lord of the Universe ! shield us and guide us. 

Trusting Thee always, through shadow and sun! 

Thou hast united us, who shall divide us ? 
Keep us, oh keep us the Many in One !" 



MAYOR^S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 9 

TAXES. 

The total amount of taxable property as of April 1, 1919, 
uot including non-resident bank shares, was |87,353,424. The 
tax was fixed at |25.80 per |1,000 valuation. 

State Tax $ 192,830 00 

Special State Tax 11,569 80 

Metropolitan Sewerage Tax 88,244 86 

Metropolitan Park Tax 50,517 52 

Wellington Bridge Tax 1,800 68 

Wellington Bridge Tax, Special 1,593 90 

Grade Crossings Tax 11,551 75 

State Highway Tax 1,472 00 

Charles River Basin Tax 7,917 24 

Alewife Brook Tax 1,169 30 

Abatement of Smoke Tax 357 94 

Fire Prevention Tax 1,389 80 

Boston Elevated Tax 169,593 77 

County Tax 99,068 47 

Non-Resident Bank Tax 3,126 34 

City Appropriation 2,353,236 00 

Overlay 11,426 31 

Total amount to be raised $3,006,865 68 

Less estimated revenue $537,040 00 

Appropriated from Excess and 

Deficiency 71,000 00 

State Income Tax Receipts 26,295 00 

State Income Tax Genl. School 

Fund Receipts 68,000 00 

702,335 00 

Net amount assessed in taxes $2,304,530 68 

Special Assessments : — 

Street Sprinkling $36,991 25 

Moths 1,347 50 



38,338 75. 



Total amount committed for collection. ...$2,342,869 43 



10 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Appropriations, classified under general headings, were 
made from revenue, as follows : — 

General Government $106,649 00 

Protection of Persons and Property 331,911 00 

Health and Sanitation 230,720 00 

Highways 257,625 00 

Charities 85,235 00 

Soldiers' Benefits , ,... 62,185 00 

Education 613,432 00 

Libraries 46,028 00 

Recreation 27,106 00 

Unclassified 59,360 00 

Municipal Indebtedness 334,500 00 

Water Works 198,485 00 

$2,353,236 00 
I Less estimated Receipts, State Income 

Tax and transfer from Excess and 

Deficiency 702,335 00 

Raised by taxation for city purposes $1,650,901 00 



MAYOR S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



11 



The following tables, giving a condensed history of the 
city's debt and tax levy, are herewith presented for reference: — 

Re- Tax Rate 
due- per $1,000 
Amount Increase tion Valuation 
of of of on Account 

Year Funded Funded Funded of Re- 

Debt Debt Debt duction of 

Funded 
Debt 



Town 

Dec. 31, 1872 

" 1873 

" 1874 

" 1875 

" 1876 

" 1877 

" 1878 

" 1879 

" 1880 

" 1881 

" 1882 

1883 

" 1884 

" 1885 

" 1886 

1887 

" 1888 

" 1S89 

" 1890 

1891 

" 1892 

" 1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

" 1900 

1901 

1902 

" 1903 

" 1904 

1905 

" 1906 

1907 

" 1908 

1909 

" 1910 

" 1911 

" 1912 

1913 

" 1914 

" 1915 

" 1916 

" 1917 

" 1918 

" 1919 

♦ $10,000 applied to pa 
t Sinking- fund applied 



$ 593,349 00 
643,354 00 
809,354 00 
1,419,854 00 
1,571,854 00 . 
1,606,854 00 
1,606,854 00 
1,596,854 00 
1,585,000 00 
1,585,000 00 
1,585,000 00 
1,585,000 00 
1,585,000 00 
1,585,000 00 

tl,525,000 00 
1,525,000 00 
1,525,000 00 
t860,500 00 
952,500 00 
1,057,500 00 
1,045,500 00 
1,194,500 00 
1,279,500 00 
1,344,500 00 
1,506,500 00 
1,531,000 00 
1,548,000 00 
1,552,000 00 
1,492,500 00 
1.478,000 00 
1,461.000 00 
1.447,000 00 
1.505,500 00 
1,498.500 00 
1.510.000 00 
1,464.500 00 
1,508,000 00 
1.466,500 00 
1,503,000 00 
1,500,000 00 
1,519,000 00 
1,674,000 00 
1,674,000 00 
1,616,000 00 
1.650,500 00 
1,729.000 00 
1,757,500 00 
1,506,000 00 
1,309,500 00 
yment of bonds; 



$50,005 
166,000 
610,500 
152,000 
45,000 
10,000 



25,000 
130,000 
150,000 

45,000 
253,000 
222,000 
172,000 
247,000 
177,000 
167,000 
176,000 
110,000 
152,000 
146,000 
175,000 
197,500 
132,500 
148,000 
100,000 
198,000 
110,000 
190,000 
160,000 
188,000 
332,000 
222,000 
145,000 
240,000 
291,000 
261,000 



40,000 
balance 



00 

00 

00 

00 

00 ♦$55,130 62 

00 *58,828 58 

61,004 64 

64,915 76 

55,739 35 

58,498 64 

61,390 59 

64,479 01 

67,719 33 

71,305 66 

66,894 23 

70,252 88 

00 37,000 00 

00 38,000 00 

00 45,000 00 

00 57,000 00 

00 104,000 00 

00 137,000 00 

00 107,000 00 

00 85,000 00 

00 152,500 00 

00 150,000 00 

00 172,000 00 

00 169,500 00 

00 166,500 00 

00 163,000 00 

00 159,000 00 

00 169,000 00 

00 139,500 00 

00 136,500 00 

00 145,500 00 

00 154,500 00 

00 151,500 00 

00 153,500 00 

00 163,000 00 

00 169,000 00 

00 177,000 00 

00 222,000 00 

00 203,000 00 

00 205,500 00 

00 212,500 00 

00 232,500 00 

251,500 00 

00 236,500 00 

to sinking funds. 



12 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
2 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



07 
30 
91 
42 

72 
59 
65 
70 
78 
87 
57 
56 
28 
27 
38 
55 
73 
27 
42 
83 
11 
39 
99 
30 
17 
02 
86 
96 
40 
30 
41 
51 
06 
4? 
26 
41 
54 
92 
63 
57 
60 
95 
97 
71 



12 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Year - Valuation Tax Levy Rate 

1872 $22,755,325 00 

1873 29,643,100 00 

18'74 30,837,700 00 

1875 31,317,000 00 

1876 :.. 26,573,400 00 

1877 25,479,400 00 

1878 20,976,900 00 

1879 18,950,100 00 

1880 20,458,100 00 

1881 22,569,100 00 

1882 23,162,200 00 

1883 23,812,900 00 

1884 24,331,100 00 

1885 24,878,400 00 

1886 26,003,200 00 

1887 27,471,800 00 

1888 28,765,400 00 

1889 30,004,600 00 

1890 32,557,500 00 

1891 36,843,400 00 

1892 ! 38,093,100 00 

1893 41,873,600 00 

1894 44,142,900 00 

1895 46,506,300 00 

1896 49,070,800 00 

1897 50,231,000 00 

1898 50,739,700 00 

1899 51,262,400 00 

1900 52,578,200 00 

1901 53,924,200 00 

1902 55,558,300 00 

1903 57,062,000 00 

1904 58,137,900 00 

1905 59,233,000 00 

1906 60,371,500 00 

1907 61,627,200 00 

1908 63,158,400 00 

1909 63,658,953 20 

1910 66,376,338 70 

1911 67,284,066 00 

1912 69,632,540 00 " 

1913 71,906.464 00 

1914 74,946,894 00 

1915 77,217,399 00 

1916 79,304,329 00 

1917 78,854,900 00 

1918 84,639,280 00 

1919 87,392,724 00 



$274,374 45 


$13 00 


389,214 48 


12 80 


473,235 50 


15 00 


518,161 40 


16 20 


504,475 24 


18 60 


471,789 14 


18 10 


409,497 10 


19 00 


352,553 80 


18 00 


402,927 71 


19 10 


452,945 45 


19 50 


425,721 16 


17 SO 


411,645 43 


16 70 


418,750 26 


16 60 


428,605 44 


16 60 


416,987 28 


15 40 


'424,309 14 


14 80 


421,458 60 


14 00 


440,324 40 


14 00 


447,704 00 


14 00 


539,137 10 


14 00 


596,357 50 


15 00 


675,886 80 


15 50 


721,165 54 


15 70 


745,609 02 


15 40 


786,412 32 


15 40 


913,574 42 


17 30 


954,187 11 


17 90 


882,580 96 


16 30 


889,916 08 


16 00 


907,439 82 


15 90 


964,535 80 


16 to 


1,038,849 84 


17 20 


1,059,292 56 


17 20 


1,144,000 14 


18 30 


1,114,023 62 


17 40 


1,144,434 92 


17 40 


1,237,694 72 


18 40 


1,260,144 32 


18 60 


1,306,888 71 


18 50 


1,366,240 92 


19 10 


1,390,824 93 


18 80 


1,505,706 98 


19 80 


1,665,289 46 


21 10 


1,764,448 81 


21 70 


1,785,540 99 


21 40 


1,790,355 60 


22 00 


2,015,783 68 


23 20 


2,305,958 62 


25 80 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Office of the City Auditor^ 
January 22, 1920. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville. 

Gentlemen : — In accordance with the requirements of Sec- 
tion 3 of Ordinance Number 44, I herewith submit a report of 
the expenditures and receipts during the year 1919, showing in 
detail the appropriations and expenditures, and the receipts 
from each source of income, also a statement of the funded debt 
and temporary loans together with a balance sheet showing the 
assets and liabilities at the close of the financial year. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

Howard E. WemysS;, 

City Auditor. 



14 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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16 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



CASH STATEMENT, DECEMBER 31, 1919. 
REVENUE. 



Receipts. 

General: — 

Taxes ..... 

Corporation, Bank and Income Taxes 

Licenses and Permits . 

Fines and Forfeits 

Comm. of Mass. Account Vocational 

Schools .... 

Smith-Hughes Fund . 
Dog Licenses .... 
Miscellaneous .... 



Special Assessments 

Departmental : — 
General Government 
Protection of Persons and Property- 
Health and Sanitation 
Highways 
Charities 
Soldiers' Benefits 
Schools 
Libraries 

Baths and Bathhouses 
Municipal Food Supply 
Miscellaneous 



Water Department Accounts . 
Interest on deposits, taxes etc. 
Temporary Loans 
Premiums on Loans 
Refunds .... 

Total receipts 

Balance at beginning of period 



. $2,329,938 


34 




166,882 


91 




9,386 


50 




2,680 
l1 


72 




8,751 


72 




1,593 


61 




2,197 


92 




1,053 


49 








$2,522,485 21 


• 




53,576 91 


$8,226 11 




2,234 


88 




24,435 


12 




4,291 


56 




30,235 


14 




79,661 


07 




5,709 


81 




1,969 


76 




848 


55 




6,687 


11 




755 


41 








165,054 52 






253,590 38 






24,057 42 






1,527,000 00 






132 00 






6,252 39 




$4,552,148 83 


• 




214,520 02 




$4,766,668 85 



CITY AUDITOR. 



17 



CASH STATEMENT, DECEMBER 

Payments. 



Appropriations 

Trust Funds Income 

Temporary Loans 

Advance to Poor Department 

Tax Titles 

State Taxes and Assessments 

County Tax ... 

Tellers' Overs and Shorts 

Refunds 

Total Payments 
Transfer to Non-Revenue 
Balance on hand 



31, 1919.- 


-Co 


ntinued. 




$2,250,487 


10 






2,328 


88 






1,609,000 


00 






50 


00 






1,576 


95 






543,442 


53 






99,068 


47 






77 


84 






609 


00 


$4,506,640 








77 






96,786 


54 






163,241 


54 




$4,766,668 


85 



NON-REVENUE. 
Receipts. 



Olive W. Cummings Estate 

Redemption Tax Liens 

Funded Debt Loans 

Refunds . . . . . 

Total Receipts 
Transfer from Revenue 
Balance at beginning of period 



Payments. 



Appropriations 
Redemption of Tax Liens 
Trust Fund Investment . 

Total Payments 
Balance on hand 



Total Revenue Receipts . 
Total Non-Revenue Receipts 



Summary. 



Total balance at beginning of period 



Total Revenue Payments 
Total Non-Revenue Payments 



Total balance on hand 



$578 

2,159 

40,000 

13 



82 
21 
00 

87 



$124,722 

2,159 

578 



32 
21 

82 



$42,751 90 
96,786 54 
25,476 14 

$165,014 58 



$127,460 35 
37,554 23 

$165,014 58 

$4,552,148 83 
42,751 90 

$4,594,900 73 
239,996 16 

$4,834,896 89 

$4,506,640 77 
127,460 35 

$4,634,101 12 
200,795 77 



$4,834,896 89 



18 










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CITY AUDITOR. 



33 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 



Payments. 

State Tax 
Special State Tax 
State Highway Tax 
Non-Resident Bank Tax 
Boston Elevated Railway Tax 
Metropolitan Sewer Assessment 
Metropolitan Park Assessment 
Wellington Bridge Assessment 
Wellington Bridge Special Assessment 
Grade Crossings Assessment 
Charles River Basin Assessment 
Alewife Brook Assessment 
Abatement of Smoke Assessment 
Fire Prevention Assessment . . 

Soldiers' Exemption Assessment 



$192,830 

11,569 

1,472 

3,126 

169,593 

88,244 

50,517 

1,800 

1,593 

11,551 

7,917 

1,169 

357 

1,389 

307 



00 
80 
00 
34 
77 
86 
52 
68 
90 
75 
24 
30 
94 
80 
63 



Total . 








$543,442 5S 




Receipts. 




State Aid . 


• • « 


$79,426 07 


Military Aid 








85 00 


Soldiers' Burials 




« 




150 00 


Income Tax, 1919 








87,880 00 


Income Tax, 1918 








11,172 00 


Income Tax, 1917 








6,384 00 


Mothers' Aid 








10,222 65 


General Aid to Poor . 








5,390 73 


Tuition State Wards . 








1,014 75 


Smith-Hughes Fund . 








1,593 61 


In Lieu of Taxes 








7a 20 . 



Total 



$203,397 01 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 



County Tax 



$99,068 4^ 



34 • ANNUAL REPORTS. 

STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENSES. 

Revenue. 

Total amount as per assessors' commitments $2,304,530 68 

Less State Taxes $378,591 91 

County Tax 99,068 47 

Overlay 11,426 31 



489,086 69 



Amount raised for municipal purposes . $1,815,443 99 

Other Revenue: — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

Income Tax, 1917, Excess . . . $6,384 00 

Income Tax, 1918, Excess . . . 5,394 48 

Income Tax, 1919 .... 94,295 00 

Sale of Land, Winter Hill ... 500 00 

Revenue from Taxes, Supplementary War- 
rants 1917 and 1918 .... 2,203 86 

Reserve Fund, Surplus from Overlays . 8,000 00 

(For School Teachers'Salaries Account) 

Estimated Revenue . . $537,040 00 

Less Deficit . . . 9,391 25 

527,648 75 



Transfer from Excess and Deficiency . 71,000 00 

715,426 09 



Total $2,530,870 08 

Expenses. 

General Appropriations .... $2,233,050 21 
Outlay Appropriations .... 106,250 00 
Metropolitan and Other Assessments . 164,850 62 

Tellers' Overs and Shorts ... 67 56 

$2,506,218 39 



Excess of Revenue .... $24,651 69 



CITY AUDITOR. 



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36 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



FUNDED DEBT. 

The total funded debt of the city January 1, 1919, was 
f 1,506,000. The debt was increased by one new loan of |40,000. 
Reduction of debt through maturities was |236,500, leaving 
a total debt December 31, 1919, of |1,309,500. 

Classified Debt January 1, 1919. 



City Loan 
Municipal Loan 
Sewer Loan 
Public Building Loan 
Highway Loan 
Bridge Loan 
Emergency Loan 

Total inside limit 
Sewer Loan 

Metropolitan Park Loan 
Water Loan 

Total outside limit 

Total Funded Debt 



$490,000 00 

39,000 00 

259,000 00 

302,000 00 

327,000 00 

31,000 00 

20,000 00 



$21,000 00 

11,000 00 

6,000 00 



$1,468,000 00 



38,000 00 
$1,506,000 00 



Loan Increasing the Debt. 



Permanent Pavement 



$40,000 00 



Debt reductions by maturities were as follows :- 



City Loan 
Municipal Loan 
Sewer Loan 
Public Building Loan 
Highway Loan . 
Bridge Loan 
Emergency Loan 

Total inside limit 
Sewer Loan 
Metropolitan Park Loan 
Water Loan 

Total outside limit 

Total Reduction . 



$92,500 00 

8,000 00 

20,000 00 

24,000 00 

78,000 00 

1,000 00 

5,000 00 



$3,000 00 
1,000 00 
4,000 00 



$228,500 00 



$8,000 00 
$236,500 00 



CITY AUDITOR. 



37 



Classified Debt December 31, 1919. 



City Bonds, 31/2% 


$48,000 


00 




City Bonds, 4% 


309,500 


00 




City Bonds, 4i/4% 


40,000 


00 




Municipal Bonds, 4i/^% 


31,000 


00 




Sewer Bonds, 3i^% 


68,000 


00 




Sewer Bonds, 4% . 


147,000 


00 




Sewer Bonds, 4^/4% . 


24,000 


00 




Public Building Bonds, 4% 


198,000 


00 




Public Building Bonds, 414% 


80,000 


00 




Highway Bonds, 4i/^% 


46,000 


00 




Highway Bonds, 4% ... 


172,000 


00 




Highway Bonds, 3l^% 


71,000 


00 




Bridge Bonds, 3i^% 


30,000 


00 




Emergency Bonds, 4i^% 


15,000 


00 




Total within limit 






$1,279,500 00 


Sewer Bonds, 4% .... 


! $18,000 


00 




Metropolitan Park Bond, 31/^% 


10,000 


00 




Water Bonds, 4% . 


2,000 


00 




Total outside limit 






30,000 00 


Total Funded Debt 


$1,309,500 00 



38 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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CITY. AUDITOR. 



41 



BORROWING CAPACITY DECEMBER 31, 1919. 



Valuation, 1917 
Supplementary 

Valuation, 1918 
Supplementary 

Valuation, 1919 
Supplementary 



Abatements, 1917 
Abatements, 1918 
Abatements, 1919 



Average valuation for three years 
Two and one-half per cent. 
Present debt within limit 

Borrowing capacity December 31, 1919 . 
Maturities: — 

January 1, 1920 .... 

April 1, 1920 

July 1, 1920 . . $69,500 00 

Less outside limit . 4,000 00 



$78,921,472 00 

13,900 00 

$84,639,280 00 

24,700 00 

$87,353,424 00 

39,300 00 



October 1, 1920 
Less outside limit 



$4,000 00 
2,000 00 



Maturities in 1920 within limit 



$78,935,372 00 



84,663,980 00 



87,392,724 00 



$476,650 00 
373,389 00 
275,675 00 



$250,992,076 00 



1,125,714 00 

$249,866,362 00 

$83,288,787 33 

2,092,219 68 

1,279,500 00 

$802,719 68 



$35,000 00 
103,000 00 



65,500 00 
2,000 00 



Total maturities on funded debt, 1920 



$205,500 00 

$1,008,219 6S 

$211,500 00 



42 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ABATEMENTS SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS PRIOR YEARS. 

Charges: — 

Street Sprinkling, 1918 .... $16 15 

Highway Betterments, 1918 ... 360 58 

Sidewalks, 1917 46 72 

$423 45 

Credit: — 

Excess and Deficiency . . . . - $423 45 

REFUNDS TAXES, CHAPTER 49, ACTS 1918. 

Charces * — 

Taxes 1917 Refunded .... $2 00 

Credit: — 

Excess and Deficiency . . . . $2 00 

WATER CHARGES 1918 REFUNDED OR ABATED. 

Charges: — 

Metered $59 46 

Annual 28 99 

■ $88 45 

Credit: — 
Excess and Deficiency .... $88 45 



TELLERS' OVERS AND SHORTS. 
Credit:- 

Balance from 1918 account . . $10 28 

Appropriation from Revenue . . 67 56 

$77 84 

Charges: — • 

Shortages $77 84 

STATE INCOME TAX, 1917. 
Charges: — 

To Revenue 1919 $6,384 00 

Credit: — 

Cash Excess from Commonwealth . $6,384 00 

STATE INCOME TAX, 1918. 
Charges: — 
Balance due froim Commonwealth . $5,777 52 

Excess to Revenue 1919 . . . 5,394 48 

$11,172 00 

Credit: — 

Cash from Commonwealth . . ^ . $11,172 00 

STATE INCOME TAX, 1919. 
Charges: — 
Estimate account General School Fund $68,000 00 
Estimate account General Purposes . 26,295 00 

$94,295 00 

Credit: — 

Cash from Commonwealth . . . $87,880 00 



Balance due on estimate . . $6,415 00 



CITY AUDITOR. 43 

REAL ESTATE LIENS AND TAX TITLES. 

('barges: — 

Balance from 1918 account 

Titles purchased .... 

K^redit: — 

Cash ...... 

Balance to 1920 account 

SALE OF LAND, WINTER HILL. 

Credit: — 

Balance from 1918 account 
Charge: — 

Revenue, 1919 ..... 

GRADE CROSSINGS ADVANCES. 

Balance from 1918 account ... $427 30 

TAILINGS. 

Credits: — 

Balance from 1918 account . . . $127 11 

Cash, Taxes paid twice . . . 164 54 



$1,219 53 
1,576 95 


$2,796 48 






717 19 




$2,079 29 


R HILL. 






$500 00 




500 00 



Balance to 1920 account . . $291 65 

PREMIUMS ON BONDS. 

Credit: — 

Premiums, Loan of April 1, 1919 . . $132 00 

ACCRUED INTEREST ON BONDS. 

Credit: — 

Cash, Loan of April 1, 1919 . . . $280 00 

Charge: — 

Applied to Interest Appropriations, 1919 . 280 00 

REVENUE FROM TAXES, SUPPLEMENTARY WARRANTS. 

Credit: — 

Balance from 1918 account . . . $2,214 18 

Supplementary Warrants Nos. land 2, 1919 1,427 94 

$3,642 12 



Charges: — 

Abatements $34 32 

Revenue, 1919 2,203 86 



2,238 18 



Balance to 1920 account . . . $1,403 94 

REDEMPTION OF TAX TITLES. 

Credit: — 

Cash received . . . . . $2,159 21 
Charges : — 

Titles redeemed, cash paid . . . 2,159 21 



4.1: ANNUAL REPORTS. 

OVERLAY ACCOUNT. 

Overlay, 1916. 

Credit:— 

Balance from 1918 account 

Charges : — 
Abatements ..... 
Transferred to Reserve Fund . 



Overlay, 1917. 

Credit: — 

Balance from 1918 account 
Recommitment .... 

Charges: — 
Abatements .... 

Transferred to Reserve Fund . 



Balance to 1920 account . . . $947 80 

Overlay, 1918* 

Credit: — 

Balance from 1918 account . . . $22,006 30 

Recommitment ..... 4 00 

— $22,010 30 





$1,416 92 


$1,321 68 
95 24 


$1,416 92 




$2,734 33 
8 00 


$2,742 33 




$1,133 60 
660 93 


1,794 53 


' 



Charges: — 

Abatements $5,258 64 

Transferred to Reserve Fund . . . 15,765 74 



21,024 38 

> 

Balance to 1920 account . . . $985 92 

Overlay, 1919. 

Credit: — 

Taxes, 1919 $11,426 31 

Recommitment ..... 2 00 

$11,428 31 

Charges: — 
Abatements 8,472 42 



Balance to 1920 account . . . $2,955 89 

RESERVE FUND, SURPLUS FROM OVERLAY. 

Credit: — 

Balance from 1918 account , . . $5,564 52 

Transfer, froim, Overlay, 1916 . . 95 24 

Overlay, 1917 . . 660 93 

Overlay, 1918 . . 15,765 74 

$22,086 43 

Charges: — 

General Appropriations . . . 8,000 00 

(School Teachers' Salaries) 

Balance to 1920 account . . . $14,086 43 



CITY AUDITOR. 



45 



EXCESS AND DEFICIENCY. 

Credit: — 

Balance from 1918 account . . . $73,027 18 

Revenue 1919, Excess .... 24,651 69 



Charges: — 

Transfers to reduce tax levy 
Adjustment of charges to Commonwealth 

of Massachusetts account State Aid . 
Abatement Special Assessments, Prior 

Years ...... 

Refund Taxes Chap. 49, 1918 
Water Charges 1918 Abated . 



Balance to 1920 account 





$97,678 87 


$71,000 00 




368 00 




423 45 

2 00 

88 45 


71,881 90 






$25,796 97 



CLASSIFICATION OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

Receipts. 



General Revenue. 

Taxes: — 

Taxes, 1919 

Taxes, 1918 

Taxes, 1917 

Taxes, 1916 

From State: — 
Corporation 
National Bank 
Street Railway 
Income Tax, 1919 
Income Tax, 1918 
Income Tax, 1917 

Excise Tax, Ship Owners 

Licenses and Permits. 



Licenses: — 

Amusement 

Dealers Motor Vehicles 

Junk .... 

Milk .... 

Pool and billiards 

Sunday 

Innholders and Victuallers 

Pedlers 

All other 



Permits: — 
Marriage 
Buildings 
Garages 
Electrical 
Miscellaneous 

Carried forward 



$1,970,375 74 

358,802 43 

664 93 

95 24 

42,626 27 

5,650 79 

13,169 85 

87,880 00 

11,172 00 

6,384 00 

258 10 



1,119 


00 


420 


00 


1,000 


00 


342 


50 


400 


00 


535 


00 


102 


00 


710 


00 


308 


50 


1,228 


00 


1,241 


50 


580 


00 


1,318 


00 


82 


00 


$2,506,466 


05 



46 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward . . . . 

Fines and Forfeits; 

Court Fines . . . . . 

Departmental Penalties . 

Grant!s and Gifts. 

From State, — Vocational Schools . 
Simith-Hughes Fund 
From County, — Dog Licenses 
From Olive W. Cummings Estate . 

AJi Other General Revenue. 

Real Estate Liens 
State, In Lieu of Taxes 



. $2,506,466 05 



2,305 22 
375 50 



8,751 72 

1,593 61 

2,197 92 

578 82 



717 19 

78 20 



Total General Revenue 


. 


• 






$2,523,064 03 


Commercial Revenu'S — Special 


Assess 


ments. 








For Expenses: — 












Street Sprinkling, 1919 






$30,433 


51 




Street Sprinkling, 1918 






8,129 


20 




Street Sprinkling, 1917 






16 


60 




Street Sprinkling, 1916 








50 




Moths, 1919 






1,109 


50 




Moths, 1918 






234 


25 




Moths, 1917 






5 


60 




For Outlays: — 












Sewers, 1917 


, , 


^ 


2,583 


01 




Sidewalks, 1919 


^ ^ 


^ 


562 


90 




Sidewalks, 1917 


^ , 


, 


857 


98 




Street Betterments, 1919 


. , 


, 


1,685 


19 




Street Betterments, 1918 and 


1917 . 
enue — 


• 


7,958 


67 




Total Commercial Rev 


Spe- 






cial Assessments 


• 


• 






$53,576 91 



Carried forward 



$2,576,640 94 



CITY AUDITOR. 



41 



Commercial Revenue — 


Departmental. 


Brought forward .... 


. $2,576,640 94 


General Government. 




Treasurer and Collector 


$7,170 99 


Assessors ..... 


19 50 


City Clerk 


966 05 


Other 


69 57 


Protection of Persons and Property. 




Police Department: — 




Service of Officers 


172 15 


Cloth 


527 42 


Rent of Court Room . 


1,000 00 


Fire Department .... 


3 42 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


531 89 


Health and Sanitation. 




Contagious Hospital 


6,903 23 


Health Department 


635 64 


Inspection ..... 


350 25 


Sanitary Department: — 




Garbage 


16,201 00 


Incinerator ..... 


345 00 


Highways. 




Labor and Materials 


"3,957 56 


Moths 


3 00 


Sidewalks Maintenance 


53 50 


Street Sprinkling .... 


37 50 


Rent of Tenements 


240 00 


Charities. 




Almshouse: — 


't 


Sale of produce, etc. . 


6,225 00 • 


Board ..... 


4,465 87 


Outside Relief: — 




Individuals . . . . " . 


19 29 


Cities and Towns 


1,605 87 


State 


5,390 73 


Mothers' Aid: — 


*■ 


Cities and Towns 


2,305 73 


State 


10,222 65 


Soldiers' Benefits. 




State Aid ..... 


79,426 07 ' 


Military Aid ..... 


85 00 


Burials ...... 


150 00 


Education. 




Tuition State Wards 


1,014 75 


Other Tuition 


3,660 42 


Rent High School Hall . 


795 00 


Miscellaneous, School Buildings 


239 64 


Libraries. 




Fines, etc 


1,969 76 


Recreation. 




Bathhouse . . . . , . 


531 45 


Shower Baths .... 


317 10 


Unclassified. 




Municipal Food Supply . 


6,687 11 


Electrolysis 


500 00 


Miscellaneous 


255 41 


Total Commercial Revenue — ] 


De- 


partmental 


$165,054 52 


Carried forward 


$2,741,695 46 



48 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Commercial Revenue — Public Service Enterprises. 



Brought forward .... 


• 


$2,741,695 46 


Water Department: — 






Sale of Water: — 






Metered, 1919 .... 


. $176,887 15 




Metered, 1918 


27,512 21 




Annual .... 


41,811 72 




Additional 


1,706 32 




Service Assessments 


2,113 67 




Maintenance Bills 


3,559 31 




Total Commercial Revenue — ] 


Public 




Service Enterprises . 


• 


$253,590 38 


Commercial Revenue — Interest. 






Deposits .... 


$10,500 09 




Taxes ..... 


11,922 42 




Special Assessments . 


416 37 




Trust Funds: — 






School ..... 


214 50 




Library . • . . 


851 82 




Poor Department 


82 02 




Miscellaneous .... 


70 20 




Total Commercial Revenue — Interest 


$24,057 42 


Municipal Indebtedness. 






Temporary Loans: — 






Anticipation of Revenue . 


. $1,527,000 00 




General Loans: — 






Highway .... 


40,000 00 




Premiums on Loans . 


132 00 


, 


Total Municipal Indebtedness 


• 


$1,567,132 00 


Agency, Trust and Investment. 






Redemption of Tax Liens 


• 


$2,159 21 


Refunds. 






Soldiers' Benefits 


$1,310 68 




General Appropriations . 


553 04 




Outlay Appropriations 


13 87 




Cash Advances, Poor Department 


4,101 00 




Miscellaneous 


287 67 




Total Refunds 


• 


$6,266 26 


Total Receipts . 


$4,594,900 73 



CITY AUDITOR. 



49 



EXPENDITURES. 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT. 

Expenses 



Outlays 



Board of Aldermen Expenses. 



Books, postage and supplies 


$41 


32 






Printing and advertising . 


99 


25 






Binding .... 


13 


75 






Auto hire, etc. . 


17 


00 






Refreshments 


828 


38 






Badges .... 


84 


00 






All other .... 


24 


26 


1,107 


96 








Clerk of Committees Department. 










Salaries and Wages: — 










Clerk .... 


$1,901 


47 






Assistant Clerk 


624 


90 






Other Expenses: — 










Books, postage and sup- 










plies .... 


54 


75 






Printing and advertising 


. 6 


25 






Telephone 


83 


72 






All other 


12 


00 


2,683 


09 








Executive Department. 










Salaries and Wages: — 










Mayor .... 


$3,500 


00 






Secretary and Clerks 


2,240' 


10 






Other Expenses: — 










Books, postage and sup- 










plies . . . 


237 


75 






Printing and advertising 


106 


85 






Inaugural expenses 


93 


00 






Telephone 


91 


20 






Auto hire 


12 


00 






Contingent expenses 


139 


05 






All other 


41 


77 


6,461 


72 








Auditing Department. 










Salaries and Wages: — 










Auditor .... 


$2,802 


38 






Clerks .... 


2,008 


34 






Other Expenses: — 










Books, postage and sup- 










plies .... 


51 


14 






Printing and advertising 


599 


55 






Binding 


28 


20 






Telephone 


46 


46 






Typewriter 


76 


25 






All other 


23 


14 


5,635 


46 






- 


Carried forward 


$15,888 23 



50 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward 

Treasury Department. 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Treasurer and Collector 
Deputy Collector 
Cashiers 
Clerks 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, postage and sup 

plies . 
Printing and advertising 
Carfares, teams, etc. 
Telephone 
Bonds 

Convention expenses 
Check writer 
Envelope sealer 
All other 



Pedlers' License Commission. 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies .... 
Printing .... 



$3,603 10 
1,700 63 
2,121 00 
6,351 74 



1,690 19 
1,272 13 

69 37 

158 44 

505 00 

67 68 

37 24 

49 00 

175 38 



Assessors' Department. 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Chairman 


$2,551 97 


Assessors 


4,000 00 


Assistant Assessors 


1,500 00 


Clerks (Office) 


5,985 49 


Clerks (Street) 


400 00 


Other Expenses: — 




Books, postage and sup- 




plies .... 


612 83 


Printing and advertising 


957 91 


Carfares, auto hire etc. . 


39 16 


Telephone 


33 95 


All other 


62 19 



$19 58 
5 50 



Certification of Notes and Bonds. 
Certifying .... 



$275 61 



City Clerk's Department. 

Salaries and Wages: — 
City Clerk 
Assistant City Clerk 
Clerks . . . . 

Other Expenses: — 
Books, postage and sup- 
plies . . . . 

Carried forward 



$3,603 10 
1,800 64 
2,874 76 



209 46 



Expenses 
$15,888 23 



(Jutlayd 



17,800 90 



16,143 50 



25 08 



275 61 



$8,487 96 $50,133 32 



CITY AUDITOR. 



Brought forward 

Printing and advertising 

Binding . 

Telephone 

Time stamp 

Badges . 

All other 



,487 96 

53 75 

11 50 

142 37 

58 80 

7 00 

45 70 



Registration City Laborers. 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Registration Clerk 


$400 00 


Other Expenses: — 




Books, postage and sup- 




plies .... 


7 40 



Expenses 
$50,133 32 



51 

Outlays 



8,807 08 



407 40 



Law Department. 



Salaries and Wages: — 




City Solicitor 


$2,451 94 


Other Expenses: — 




Books, postage and sup- 




plies .... 


15 00 


Printing and advertis- 




ing . 


22 50 


Clerical hire . 


156 00 


Witness fees, etc. . 


33 60 


Telephone 


20 00 


All other . . * 


20 62 



City Messenger's Department. 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Messenger 
Other Expenses: — 

Auto maintenance . 

Telephone 

Carfares 

New automobile 

Engineering Department. 

Salaries and Wages: — 

City Engineer 

Assistants 

Clerks .... 
Other Expenses: — 

Books, printing, postage 
etc. . . . 

Telephone . 

Auto maintenance . 

Instruments and equip- 
ment .... 



!,001 48 



669 


22 


23 


55 


12 


64 


1,964 


71 



3,603 10 

7.054 92 

939 00 



155 59 

97 39 

1,337 38 

24 16 



2,719 66 



4,671 60 



Carried forward 



$13,211 54 $66,739 06 



52 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward . . $13,211 54 

Carfares . . . 222 67 

All other ... 5 21 

Public Buildings Department, Commis- 
sioner of Public Buildings. 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Commissioner . . $2,802 38 

Inspector of Plumbing . 1,648 86 

Clerks .... 1,323 33 

Other Expenses: — 
Books, postage and sup- 
plies .... 209 70 
Printing and advertising 105 75 
Telephone ... 143 30 
Auto maintenance . . 703 40 
All other ... 17 31 



Maintenance Municipal Buildings, City 
Hall and City Hall Annex. 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Janitors . . . $4,166 49 

Labor .... 525 01 

Other Expenses: — 

Fuel and light . . 2,505 24 

Furniture and furnish 



mgs 
Janitors' supplies . 
Repairs, buildings 
Heating apparatus and 

equipment . 
Plumbing and supplies 
Hardware and materials 
Ice 
All other 

City Planning Board. 

Clerical hire 

Books, postage and supplies 

Filing cabinets 



Election Expenses, City Clerk. 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Clerks .... 

Other Expenses: — 
Equipment and supplies 
Printing and advertising 
Carfares and auto hire . 
Ballot boxes and repairs 
Refreshments 
All other 



1,437 39 

298 77 
804 28 

13 91 
251 90 

77 36 
279 78 
159 77 



$5 00 

4 75 

38 51 



$480 91 



Expenses 
$66,739 06 

13,439 42 



Outlays 



6,954 03 



10,519 90 



48 26 



Carried forward 



364 74 




1,082 41 




263 25 




126 55 




22 57 




2 40 






2,342 83 






$100,043 50 



CITY AUDITOR. 53 

Expenses Outlays 

Brought forward . . $100,043 50 

Election Expenses, Registrars of Voters. 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Registrars . . . $1,200 00 

Clerks .... 138 00 

Clerical hire ... 798 00 

Other Expenses: — 
Books, postage and sup- 
plies .... 98 52 
Printing and advertising 789 94 
Binding ... 10 00 
Refreshments . . 6 98 
Auto hire ... 12 00 

3,053 44 



Election Expenses, Pay of Election Of- 
ficers. 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Wardens and clerks . $1,584 00 

Inspectors . . . 2,816 00 



4,400 00 



Public Buildings Department, Mainte- 
nance Polling Places. 

Labor 



Teaming 


84 00 


Rent .... 


130 00 


Lumber 


24 94 


Hardware and materials 


3 10 


Fuel and light 


39 66 



474 29 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY. 

Expenses Outlays 

Extreme Emergency, Health and Safety. 

Salaries and Wages: — 



Clerks .... 


$1,214 60 


Investigator . 


34 05 


Other Expenses: — 




Books, postage and sup- 




plies .... 


177 46 


Printing and advertising 


53 75 


Telephone 


97 36 


State Guard 


862 80 


E?mergency Hospital: 




Contract for Construc- 


V 


tion 


1,454 95 


Labor and teams 


348 58 



Carried forward . • $4,243 55 $107,971 23 



54 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward 

Materials and equip- 
ment 
All other 

Police Department. 
Salaries and Wages: — 



$4,243 55 

25 90 
113 04 



Expenses 
$107,971 23 



Outlays 



$4,382 49 



Chief .... 


$2,875 95 




Captains and Lieutenants 


11,491 33 




Sergeants and Inspectors 


6,800 00 




Patrolmen 


116,594 12 




Special police 


325 75 




Matrons . . 


884 13 




Other employees 


3,919 85 




Horses and Care of Same: — 






Hay, grain and straw . 


208 12 




Shoeing .... 


58 00 




All other 


20 25 




Equipment and Repairs: — 






Automobiles and motor- 






cycles .... 


652 43 




New Motor equipment . 


1,195 00 




Equipment for men 


355 04 




Gasoline, oil and supplies 


768 75 




All other 


188 16 




Other Expenses: — 






Books, printing, postage 






and supplies 


233 26 




Care of prisoners . 


43 74 




Telephone 


286 12 




Laundry 


42 41 




Bedding 


11 42 




Travel and disbursements 


139 77 




All other 


146 44 


147.240 04 


Public Buildings Department, 


Malnte- 


nance Police Buildings. 






Salaries and Wages: — 






Janitors .... 


$1,905 43 




Labor .... 


207 14 




Maintenance of Buildings: — 






Fuel and light 


1,405 03 




Janitors' supplies . 


90 61 




Furniture and furnishings 


10 64 




Repairs, buildings 


2 45 




Heating apparatus and 






equipment . 


.40 49 




Plumbing and supplies . 


40 93 




Hardware and materials . ' 


64 27 




All other 


28 43 





3.795 42 



Carried forward 



$259,006 69 $4,382 49 



CITY AUDITOR. 



iyiy 



Brought forward 

Fire Department. 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Chief Engineer 

Assistant Engineers 

Firemen 

Callmen .... 

Temporary and Emer- 
gency men . 
Horses and Care of Same: — 

Horses .... 

Hay, grain and straw . 

Shoeing .... 

Medicine and veterinary 

All other 
Equipment and Repairs: — 

Apparatus 

Hose .... 

Equipment for men 

Power .... 

Hardware, tools, etc. 
Other Expenses: — 

Books, printing, postage 
and supplies 

Telephone 

Janitors' supplies 

Furnishings 

Laundry work 

All other 
Supplies: — 

Grease and oil 

Gasoline 

Fuel 

Ice 

Soda and acid 

All other 



Public Buildings Department, 
nance Fire Buildings. 

Salaries and Wages: — * 

Labor 
Other Expenses: — 
Fuel and light 
Furniture and furnishings 
Janitors' supplies . 
Repairs, buildings . 
Heating apparatus and 

equipment . 
Plumbing and supplies 
Lumber, hardware and 

materials 
All other 







Expenses 


Outlays 






$259,006 69 


$4,382 49 


$2,875 


95 






4,350 


94 






119,215 


69 






2,419 


32 






60 


28 






500 


00 






4,074 


41 






1,074 


50 






17 


20 






37 


05 






2,166 


14 






470 


70 






31 


99 






12 


72 






145 


17 






38 


05 






491 


64 






292 


07 






162 


58 






332 


62 






888 


48 






233 


39 






955 


96 






10 


30 






118 


86 






94 


22 






297 


88 


141,368 11 





Mainte- 



$828 80 

5,394 42 

331 72 

1 60 

746 70 

918 05 
1,279 54 

259 74 
30 45 



9,791 02 



Carried forward 



$410,165 82 $4,382 49 



56 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 









Expenses 


Outlays 


Brought forward 






$410,165 82 


$4,382 49 


Weights and Measures Depa 


rtment. 








Salaries and Wages: — 










Sealer .... 


$1,450 


00 






Deputy sealer 


1,375 


00 






Helper 


30 


00 






Other Expenses: — 










Books, postage and sup- 










plies .... 


44 


92 






Printing and advertising 


14 


50 






Carfares, etc. . 




58 






Equipment 


26 


99 






Telephone 


26 


94 






Auto maintenance . 


437 


54 






All other 


6 


30 


3,412 77 












Electrical Department. 










Salaries and Wages: — 










Commissioner 


$2,351 


93 






Clerk .... 


834 


67 






Labor .... 


10,769 


40 






Other Expenses: — 










Fire Alarm System 


162 


61 






Police Signal System 


359 


40 






Auto maintenance . 


436 


45 






Telephone 


102 


60 






Books, printing, postage 










and supplies 


118 


54 






Laundry 


9 


82 






All other 


10 


68 


15,156 10 





Public Buildings Department, Mainte- 
nance Electrical Department Building. 

Labor .... $151 44 

supplies 



Janitors' 

Fuel 

Furniture and furnishings 

Heating apparatus 



Suppression of Moths. 

Labor . . . . 

Books, printing, postage 

and supplies . 
Teams 
Hardware, Tools and equip 

ment 
Insecticides 
Material and supplies 
All other . 



266 20 

110 20 

31 00 

8 25 



$4,102 17 

74 78 
337 31 

71 17 

65 41 

39 80 

9 36 



567 09 



4,700 00 



Carried forward 



$434,001 78 



$4,382 49 



CITY AUDITOR. O < 



Brought forward 

Care of Trees. 

Labor .... 

Teams .... 
Equipment,' hardware and 
tools .... 
Lumber and materials 
Use of steam roller . 





Expenses 


Outlays 




$434,001 78 


$4,382 49 


$3,801 12 
637 97 




• 


145 20 
204 28 
108 02 


A SQ« FCQ 





HEALTH AND SANITATION. 

Expenses Outlays 



1,575 


41 


538 


42 


887 


62 


966 


21 


452 


00 


1,740 


30 


$497 


00 


220 


33 


55 


06 


74 


78 


307 


64 



Health Department. 

General Administration: — 
Salaries and Wages: — 

Agent .... $1,375 39 

Clerk .... 
Temporary clerk 
Medical Inspector and 

Bacteriologist 
Acting Medical Inspector 
Acting Bacteriologist 
Health Nurses 
Books, printing, and 

postage 
Telephone 

Convention expenses 
Typewriter 
All other 

Quarantine and Contagious 
Diseases: — 

Board and Treatment: — 
Cities and towns . 
Other Institutions 
All other 

Tuberculosis: — 
Board and Treatment: — 

Cities and towns . 
State .... 
Other Institutions 
Groceries and provi- 
sions 
All other 

Other Expenses: — 

Equipment and supplies . 
Auto maintenance . 
Burying dead animals . 
All other 



Carried forward 



608 32 

579 17 

11 33 






492 75 
2,773 13 

40 75 


• 




1,426 28 
18 00 






162 91 

645 82 

66 50 

90 


15,516 02 










$454,414 39 


$4,382 49 



58 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward 

City Clerk's Department, Vital Statistics. 



Canvassing and reporting 

births 
Reporting deaths 
Printing and advertising 
Books and supplies . 
All other . 



$796 45 

189 50 

36 00 

67 04 

42 75 



Contagious Hospital. 






Salaries and Wages: — 






Matron .... 


$1,060 


00 


Nurses and other help . 


9,826 


03 


Otber Expenses: — 






Drugs and medicines 


213 


42 


Medical attendance 


79 


00 


Bedding, dry goods and 






clothing 


414 


47 


Groceries and provisions 


8,761 


03 


Equipment and supplies . 


1,726 


64 


Telephone 


87 


83 


Electric power 


107 


98 


All other 


53 


30 



Public Buildings Department, Mainte- 
nance Contagious Hospital. 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Janitor and labor . . $576 94 

Other Expenses: — 
Fuel 

Light 

Janitors' supplies . 
Furniture and furnishings 
Repairs, buildings 
Heating apparatus and 

equipment . 
Plumbing 

Hardware and materials . 
Granolithic work 
Addition to hospital 
All other 



Inspection of Animals and Provisions, 



1,667 


38 


840 


84 


41 


16 


301 


29 


35 


68 


6 


61 


73 


93 


127 


82 


172 


80 


677 


09 


45 


84 



Salaries and Wages; 
Inspector 

Other Expenses: — 
Telephone 



$1,800 64 
34 24 



Expenses 
$454,414 39 



Outlays 

$4,382 49 



1,131 74 



22,329 70 



4,567 38 



1,834 88 



Carried forward 



$484,278 09 



$4,382 49 



CITY AUDITOR. 



59 









Expenses 


Outlays 


Brought forward 






$484,278 09 


$4,382 49 


Inspection of Milk and Vinegar. 










Salaries and Wages: — 
Inspector 
Milk Collector • . 


$1,800 
1,143 


64 

90 






Other Expenses: — 

Books, printing and post- 
age .... 
Maintenance of auto 
Equipment and supplies 
Telephone . ... 
All other . . . . 


33 
973 
104 

28 
9 


75 
96 
96 
70 
95 


4,095 86 












Inspection of School Children. 










Salaries and Wages: — 
Inspectors 

Other Expenses: — 

Books, printing and sup- 
plies .... 
Carfares 


$1,600 

43 
79 


00 

25 
00 







School Nurses' Salaries. 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Nurses . . . . 


$1,713 57 


Sewers Construction. 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Inspector 


$70 91 


Labor . . . . 


1,717 42 


Other Expenses: — 




Teaming 


433 71 


Pipe and fittings . 


'311 77 


Brick and cement 


777 37 


iSand . . . . 


30 50 


Castings 


483 90 


Freight ... 


105 14 


Storm drain . 


680 30 


Engineering Department, 


Sewers Maln- 


tenance. 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Inspector 


$650 42 


Labor . . . . 


11,795 89 


Other Expenses: — 




Teaming 


7,412 03 


Tools and equipment 


438 63 


Brick and cement . 


28 47 


Pipe and fittings . 


43 72 


Castings 


14 00 


Other materials and sup 




plies . . . . 


138 17 



1,722 25 



1,713 57 



4,611 02 



Carried forward 



$20,521 33 $491,809 77 



5,993 51 



60 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward . • 

Care of Medford Street 
pump .... 
Telephone 
All other 



Public Butildings Department, 
nance Sewer Buildings. 

Salaries and Wages: — 
Labor .... 

Other Expenses: — 

Fuel .... 

Light .... 

Plumbing 

Hardware and materials 



Sanitary Department. 

General Administration: 
Superintendent 
Bookkeeper 

Books, printing and sup- 
plies .... 
Telephone 
Auto maintenance . 
All other 

Ashes, Rubbish and Garbage: 

Labor . 

Hired teams . 

Equipment and repairs . 

Rent of dump 

Materials and supplies . 
Stable Expenses: — 

Horses .... 

Hay, grain and straw 

Shoeing .... 

Veterinary and medicine 

Stable equipment . 
Other Expenses: — 

Fence, Mystic Avenue . 

Repairs track, North 
Somerville 



Expenses Outlays 

$20,521 33 $491,809 77 $8,993 51 



82 66 

53 50 

1 32 



Malnte- 



$35 32 

34 48 
39 43 

2 22 
8 42 



$2,101 49 
300 00 

14 83 

48 11 

514 06 

5 51 

88,297 70 

33,096 53 

2,020 OB 

600 00 

84 88 

750 00 
9,729 40 
488 14 
138 76 
303 10 

37 15 

65 17 



Public Buildings Department, Mainte- 
nance Sanitary Buildings. 

Labor .... $32 39 

Fuel .... 113 00 

Light . . . . 236 80 

Furniture and furnishings . 30 

Repairs, buildings . . 409 17 

Plumbing and supplies . 14 00 

Hardware and materials . 157 10 



20,658 81 



119 87 



138,594 91 



962 76 



Carried forward 



$652,146 12 



$8,993 51 



CITY AUDITOR. 



61 







Expenses Outlays 


Brought forward 




$652,146 12 $8,993 51 


Street Cleaning. 






Labor .... 


$21,408 00 




Hired teams 


4,419 75 




Use of truck 


16 89 




Equipment 


46 06 


25.890 70 




HIGHWAYS 


Highway Maintenance. 






General Administration: — 






Superintendent 


$2,802 38 




Bookkeeper and clerk . 


2,242 38 




Books, printing, postage 






and supplies 


182 29 




Telephone 


214 54 




Maintenance Superin- 






tendent's au,to . 


213 33 




All other 


94 27 




General: — 






Labor .... 


38,097 45 




Hired teams . 


553 00 




Tools, equipment and re- 






pairs .... 


1,929 21 




Autos and supplies 


1,435 76 




Broken stone, gravel, etc. 


4,234 29 




Edgestone, bricks and 






cement 


558 44 




JliUmber .... 


163 91 




Tarvia and road oil 


4,009 75 




Fuel .... 


1,150 62 


- 


Oil and waste 


369 44 




Hardware, paint and var- 






nish .... 


400 11 




Other materials and sup- 






plies .... 


148 24 




Horses .... 


1,225 00 




Hay, grain and straw 


8,475 90 




Shoeing .... 


332 70 




Veterinary and medicine 


170 36 




Harnesses and horse 






clothing 


473 58 




All other 


18 02 




Other Expenses: — 






Signs .... 


213 68 




Taxes, City of Waltham . 


216 60 




Repairing bridges . 


247 56 




All other 


79 17 






$70,251 98 




Less service transfers for 






teams and materials 




• 


furnished other depart- 






ments .... 


16,390 04 


53,861 94 






Carried forward 


$731,898 76 $8,993 51 



(\2 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward 

Highways Construction, New Streets. 



Expenses 
$731,898 76 



Outlays 
8,993 51 



Contracts 

Edgestone and circles 

Tarvia 

Advertising, etc. 



$21,445 44 

9,136 25 

2,526 08 

67 25 



Highways Construction, Permanent Pavement. 



Contracts 
All other 



$20,318 12 
37 50 



Highway Reconstruction and Resurfacing. 



Labor 

Hired teams and trucks 

Use of roller 

Tools and equipment 

Tarvia 

Brick, stone, cement 

Other materials 

Sidewalks Construction. 

Labor 

Hired teams 
Contracts . 
Stone, brick, cement 
Edgestone . . 
Other materials 
All other . 

Sidewalks Maintenance. 

Labor .... 

Hired teams 

Stone, brick and cement 
Use truck and roller 
Materials and supplies 

Street Sprinkling. 

Labor 

Hired teams and trucks 
Equipment and repairs 
Oil and other dust layers 
Maintenance water posts 

and hydrants . 
Use steam rollers 
Use car sprinkler 
Hardware and materials 
All other . 



Carried forward 



$14,430 

3,452 

1,410 

956 

9,533 

18,632 

230 



19 
74 
15 
74 
72 
13 
03 



$268 31 
24 51 
14,909 91 
24 QQ 
13 59 
38 
22 50 



$4,860 77 

770 84 

923 56 

88 91 

454 79 



$5,262 92 

4,187 56 

506 31 

22,799 49 

267 60 

19 25 

4,569 26 

70 25 

2 00 



33,175 I'J 



20,355 62 



48,645 70 



15,263 S6 



7,098 87 



37,684 64 



$776,682 27 $126,433 81 



CITY AUDITOR. 



iM) 



Brought forward 
Street Lighting. 

Contract: 

Electricity 
Spot lights 



$62,606 97 
234 91 



Public Buildings Department, Mainte- 
nance Highway Buildings. 

Labor .... $173 55 

Fuel 306 30 

Light .... 232 43 

Hardware and materials . 45 71 

Lumber .... 98 05 

Repairs, buildings . . 22 08 
Heating apparatus and 

equipment ... 3 07 

Plumbing ... 3 75 

All other ... 37 



Expenses 

$776,682 27 



Outlays 
$126,433 81 



62.841 88 



885 31 



CHARITIES. 



Poor Department. 
Advance for immediate aid 

Poor Department, Miscellcneous. 



$50 00 



50 00 



General Administration: — 






Agent . . . . 


1,346 


80 


Clerks . 


1,566 


13 


Books, printing, postage 


^ 




and supplies 


112 


97 


Telephone 


107 


39 


All other 


62 


00 


Outside Relief: — 






City Physician 


1,800 


00 


Auto maintenance . 


100 


00 


Acting City Physician 


70 


00 


Board and care 


2,742 


24 


Cash . . . . 


13,476 


40 


Cash allowance 


1,076 


23 


Groceries and provisions 


5 3,670 


73 


Coal and wood 


1,146 


30 


Medicines and medical at 


- 




tendance 


176 


27 


Dry goods and clothing . 


6 


50 


Nursing . . . 


144 


00 


State Institutions . 


266 


72 


Contagious Hospital 


228 


23 


Somerville Hospital 


5,218 


44 


Other Institutions . 


1,201 


49 



Carried forward 



$34,518 84 $840,459 46 $126,433 81 



64 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward 



Expenses Outlays 

$34,518 84 $840,459 46 $126,433 81 



Burials .... 


261 00 




All other 


33 91 




Relief by Other Cities and 






Towns: — 


• 




Cities .... 


3,641 84 




Towns .... 


645 03 




Mothers' Aid: — 






By city 


26,725 00 




Other cities and towns . 


1,701 26 


67,526 88 






Poor Department, City Home. 


• 




Salaries and Wages: — 






Warden and Matron 


$1,883 13 




Bookkeeper 


100 00 




Domestic labor 


2,151 65 




Farm labor . 


2,468 99 




Other Expenses: — 






Auto maintenance 


156 97 




Groceries and provisions 


5,098 31 




Clothing 


358 51 




Medicine and hospital 






goods .... 


130 19 




Household utensils and 






supplies 


275 98 




Farm equipment and sup- 






plies 


550 07 




Live stock and care 


416 61 




Garbage .... 


548 00 • 




Hay, grain and feed 


997 21 




Horse shoeing 


35 00 




Seeds and fertilizer 


116 55 




Books, printing and sta- 






tionery 


23 07 




Telephone 


45 93 




Power 


59 89 




Ice .... 


110 43 




All other 


262 85 





Public Buildings Department, Mainte- 
nance City Home Buildings. 

Labor .... $73 66 

Fuel .... 834 21 

Light .... 473 62 

Furniture and furnishings 424 36 

Repairs, buildings . . 233 63 
Heating apparatus and 

equipment . . . 101 85 

Plumbing .... 41 43 

Hardware and materials . 18 57 

Piazza on hospital . . 750 00 

Granolithic work . . 43 00 



15,789 34 



2,994 33 



Carried forward 



$926,770 01 $126,433 81 



CITY AUDITOR. 65 

SOLDIERS' BENEFITS 

Expenses Outlays 

Brought forward . . $926,770 01 $126,433 81 

Soldiers' Benefits, General Administra- 
tion. 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Agent .... 

Clerk .... 
Other Expenses: — 

Soldiers' Relief. 

Cash as per pay rolls 
Medicine and medical at- 
tendance 

Military Aid. 

Cash as per pay rolls 

State Aid. 

Cash as per pay rolls 

State Aid — Allied War. 

Cash as per pay rolls 

Soldiers' Bu<rials. 
Burials .... 



$300 00 

834 66 

78 61 


1,213 27 




$21,598 00 




192 65 


21,790 65 



$450 


00 


$11,894 


00 


$14,226 


98 


295 


27 



450 00 
11,894 00 

14,226 98 

295 27 



EDUCATION. 


$3,966 


65 


2,850 


33 


3,803 


56 


1,931 


45 


224 


76 


1,106 


27 


916 


36 


424 


38 


397 


93 


490 


76 


8,882 


76 


85 


04 


82 


34 


11,941 


36 


3,665 


14 



School Contingent. 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Superintendent 

Assistant Superintendent 

Clerks .... 

Truant Officers 

Other employees 
General Expenses: — 

Printing, postage and of- 
fice supplies 

Telephone 

Automobile maintenance 

Travel .... 

All other 

Textbooks and Supplies: — 
Text and reference books 
Maps .... 
Music .... 
Stationery and supplies 
Equipment and repairs . 

Carried forward . . $40,769 09 $976,640 18 $126,433 81 



66 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward 

Other Expenses: — 
Tuition . 
Support of truants 



$40,769 09 



1,108 72 
267 58 



Expenses 
$976,640 18 



Outlays 
$126,433 81 



Diplomas and graduation 


342 53 






Printing and advertising 


537 75 






Power . . . 


684 02 






All other 


21 00 










43,730 


69 






School Teachers' Salaries. 








Day Schools . 


$452,385 74 






Evening Schools 


8,405 50 










460,791 


24 






Maintenance School Buildings, 


Fuel and 






Light. 








Labor .... 


$109 48 






Fuel .... 


27,315 18 






Light .... 


9,251 69 






All other .... 


21 69 










36,698 


04 






Maintenance School Buildings, 


Janitors' 






Salaries. 








Janitors' Salaries 


$48,441 07 










48,441 


07 


Maintenance School Buildings, 


Buildings 






and Grounds. 








Labor .... 


$7,805 28 






Furniture and furnishings 


2,701 11 






Janitors' supplies 


2,418 12 






Laundry .... 


47 28 






Repairs, buildings 


3,021 29 






Heating apparatus and 








equipment 


9,992 26 






Plumbing 


2,540 37 






Glass, hardware and paint 


2,018 81 






Lumber .... 


1,378 51 






Other materials and sup- 








plies .... 


611 00 






Care of grounds 


2,736 69 






Flags and flag poles . 


538 40 






Auto maintenance 


399 51 






Power .... 


336 26 






Use Y. M. C. A. Gymnasium 


450 00 






Use Armory 


250 00 






All other 


855 89 






— 




38,100 


78 



New School Building, Holland Street. 

Final payment on contract $200 00 



200 00 



Carried forward 



$1,604,402 00 $126,633 81 



CITY AUDITOR. 



67 



Brought forward 

Southern Junior High School. 

Concrete walks . 



Expenses 
$1,604,402 00 



$155 25 



Outlays 
$126,633 81 

155 25 



Boys' Industrial School Addition, No. 1. 

Electrical work . . $180 91 

Heating apparatus . ' . 13 95 

Equipment . . . 341 53 

Hardware and materials . 31 10 



Boys' Industrial School Addition, No. 2. 

•Final payment on contract $3,331 53 

Driveway .... 30 46 



567 49 



3,361 99 



SCHOOL TRUST FUNDS. 
S. Newton Cutler Fu'nd. 
Books .... $232 68 



232 68 



Smith-Hughes Fund. 

School teachers' salaries 



$1,039 00 





LIBRARIES 


J.,UOi7 VV 


Central Library. 










Salaries and Wages: — 










Librarian 




$2,479 


45 




Assistants 




13,062 


93 




Books, Periodicals, Etc.: — 










Books .... 




3,527 


80 




Periodicals 




568 


69 




Music .... 




1 


21 




Binding 




1,061 


67 




Pictures 




5 


00 




Other Expenses: — 










Postage and office sup- 










plies .... 




794 


45 




Printing and advertising 




561 


09 




Telephone 




133 


87 




Catalogue cards 




100 


00 




Express .... 




220 


22 




Agencies 




1 


87 




Convention expenses 




62 


38 




All other 




74 


30 


22,654 93 










Public Buildings Department, 


Mainte 


- 




nance Central Library. 










Janitors .... 




$2,222 


71 




Labor .... 




355 


96 




Fuel .... 




157 


00 




Carried forward 




$2,735 67 $1,628,328 61 $130,718 54 



68 A.XNUAL REPORTS. 

Expenses Outlays 

Brought forward . . $2,735 67 $1,628,328 61 $130,718 54 



Light .... 


984 11 


Furniture and furnishings . 


117 24 


Janitors' supplies 


100 40 


Repairs, buildings 


119 72 


Plumbing .... 


35 87 


Hardware and materials . 


124 99 


All other 


50 



West Somerville Branch Library. 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Assistants . . . $4,270 19 

Books, Periodicals, Etc.: — 

Books .... 1,593 77 

Periodicals ... 304 97 

Binding .... 410 45 

Other Expenses: — 

Postage and office sup- 
plies .... 60 19 
Printing and advertising 49 50 
Telephone ... 35 18 
Express ... 118 72 



$1,126 


00 


147 


64 


404 


53 


447 


05 


1 


40 


2 


00 


2 


50 


39 


16 


28 


00 



Public Buildings Department, Mainte- 
nance West Somerville Branch Li- 
brary. 

Janitor .... 
Labor .... 

Fuel .... 

Light .... 

Furniture and furnishings . 
Repairs, buildings 
Plumbing .... 
Hardware and materials 
All other 

East Somerville Branch Library. 

Salaries and Wages: — 

Assistants . . . $2,437 28 

Books, Periodicals, Etc.: — 

Books .... 527 73 

Periodicals ... 112 00 

Binding .... 296 60 

Other Expenses: — 

Postage and office sup- 
plies .... 39 47 
Printing and advertising 21 75 
Telephone ... 41 43 
Express .... 92 68 
All other ... 2 00 



4,218 50 



6,842 97 



2,198 28 



3,570 94 



Carried forward . . $1,645,159 30 $130,718 54 



CITY AUDITOR. 69 

Expenses Outlays 

lirought forward . . $1,645,159 30 $130,718 54 

Public Buildings Department, Mainte- 
nance East Somerville Branch Library. 
Janitor . . . . $876 00 

Labor .... 33 63 

Fuel .... 190 70 

Light .... 244 17 

Janitors' supplies . . 7 67 

Heating apparatus, and 

equipment ... 95 70 

All other .... 117 53 

1,565 40 



Union Squ'are Branch Library. 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Assistants 


$2,351 72 


Books, Periodicals, Etc.: — 




Books .... 


662 11 


Periodicals 


131 51 


Binding 


276 64 


Other Expenses: — 




Postage and office sup- 




plies 


55 40 


Printing and advertising 


28 00 


Telephone . . 


31 80 


Express 


92 70 



3,629 88 



Public Buildings Department, Mainte- 
nance Union Square Branch Library. 

Janitor .... $876 00 

Labor 



±^a,uyjL . . . < 

Fuel 


273 53 


Light 


295 71 


Furniture and furnishings 


12 50 


Janitors' supplies 


1 40 


Repairs, buildings 


3 70 


Hardware and materials 


29 39 


Care of grounds 


14 00 



1,548 39 



PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 
S. Newton Cutler Fund. 
Books .... $68 84 



Martha R. Hunt, Art Fund. 

Picture reflector, Foss Me- 
morial .... 
Art cabinet 


$50 60 
45 80 



Martha R. Hunt, Book Fund. 

Books .... $771 09 



68 84 



96 40 



771 09 



Carried forward . . $1,652,839 30 $130,718 54 



70 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward 

Isaac Pitman, Art Fund. 

Pictures 

Books and music 



Isaac Pitman, Poetry Fund. 
Books .... 



$24 45 
41 85 



Expenses Outlays 

$1,652,839 30 $130,718 54 



66 30 



$41 29 



Francis A. Wilder Children's Fund. 

Books .... $13 28 



41 29 



13 28 



RECREATION. 



Engineering Department, P 


arks Mainte- 




nance. 




■ 


Labor .... 


$6,648 70 




Teaming . 


573 14 




Equipment and repairs 


361 70 




Hardware, lumber and ma- 






terials .... 


72 74 




Trees, shrubs and plants . 


303 77 




Christmas tree expenses . 


266 30 




Carpentry and repairs 


433 51 




Flags and flag poles . 


312 40 




Repairing Powder House 






Boulevard 


99 41 




All other .... 


17 79 


9,089 46 






Pu'bllc Buildings Departm 


ent, Mainte- 




nance Park Buildings. 






Labor .... 


$416 94 




Teams 


10 00 




Fuel .... 


145 20 




Light .... 


336 37 




Repairs, buildings 


8 55 




Heating apparatus and 






equipment 


24 33 




Plumbing 


107 45 




Hardware and materials . 


33 45 




Laundry and janitors' sup- 






plies .... 


119 15 




All other .... 


1 32 


1,202 76 






Engineering Department, 


Playgrounds 




Maintenance. 






Labor .... 


$3,118 91 




Teaming .... 


366 60 




Apparatus and repairs 


368 50 




Materials and supplies 


164 82 





Carried forward 



$4,018 83 $1,663,252 39 $130,718 54 



CITY AUDITOR. 



71 



Brought forward 



Repairs to fountains, fences, 127 75 


etc. 


52 


All other 




• 


Playgrounds and Recreation Commission. 


Salaries and Wages: — 




Supervisors 


$1,156 01 


Instructors 


1,161 50 


Social worker 


454 80 


Other helpers 


193 50 


Other Expenses: — 




Equipment and supplies 


219 79 


Plowing, teaming, etc. 


165 87 


Us© of auto 


244 85 


Civic social centre 


57 28 


All other 


23 83 


Public Buildings Depart 


ment, Mainte- 


nance Bathhouse. 




Salaries and Wages: — 




Attendants 


$1,202 70 


Labor 


62 25 


Other Expenses: — 




Bathing suits, etc. 


127 48 


Towels . 


23 52 


Equipment and supplies 


5 13 88 


Sand .... 


500 00 


Telephone 


23 92 


Laundry 


175 74 


Repairs, buildings 


75 70 


Hardware and materials , 


11 40 


All other 


31 25 


Celebrations. 




Printing and postage 


$216 74 


Certificates and medals 


2,362 31 


Music .... 


2,063 50 


Refreshments 


591 06 


Decorating 


253 20 


Fireworks .... 


1,500 00 


Special cars . 


156 75 


All other .... 


124 55 



Expenses 
$4,018 83 $1,663,252 39 



4,147 10 



Outlays 
$130,718 54 



3,677 43 



2,247 84 



7,268 11 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Memorial Day. 

Music and catering 
Flowers and flags 
All other . 



Carried forward 



$265 40 




79 61 




59 86 






404 87 





$1,680,997 74 $130,718 54 



72 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



$1,267 59 

125 50 

15 25 

1 35 



Brought forward 

Municipal Documents. 

Printing: 
Annual reports 
Municipal registers 
Regulations 

Express 



IVIunicipal Food Supply. 

Printing 

Stationery and postage 

Canned goods 



Workmen's Compensation. 

Books, postage and sup- 
plies .... 
Compensation for injuries 
Medicine and medical at- 
tendance 



Pensions. 

Janitors 

Police 

Fire 

Health 

Poor 

Laborers: — 
Highway 
Sanitary 
Water 



Damage to Persons and Personal Prop- 
erty. 

Settlement of claims . . $4,824 65 



Expenses Outlays 

$1,680,997 74 $130,718 54 



$27 25 


4 


40 


6,720 


21 


$2 


00 


3,380 


67 


142 


00 


$1,999 


83 


8,067 


97 


3,962 


63 


750 


00 


850 


00 


3,354 


48 


384 


38 


1,197 


29 



1,409 69 



6,751 86 



3,524 67 



20,566 58 



4,824 65 



MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS. 



Interest. 






' 


Temporary loans: — 








Anticipation of Revenue . 


$44,465 78 






General loans 








Sewer . . . 


10,641 25 






Highway 


11,882 50 






Municipal 


1,755 00 






City . . . . 


18,162 50 






Bridge . . . . 


1,067 50 






Metropolitan Park . 


385 00 






Public buildings 


12,285 00 






Emergency . . , 


850 00 


101,494 53 











Carried forward 



$1,819,569 72 $130,718 5i 



CITY AUDITOR. 



73 



Brought forward . • 

Reduction of Funded Debt. 

■General Loans: — 
Sewer 
Highway 
Municipal 
City 
Bridge 

Metropolitan Park 
Public buildings 
Emergency 





Expenses 


Outlays 




$1,819,569 72 


$130,718 54 


$23,000 00 






78,000 00 






8,000 00 






92,500 00 






1,000 00 






1,000 00 






24,000 00 






5,000 00 


232,500 00 





WATER WORKS. 



Water Maintenance. 



Administration : — 








Commissioner 


$2,802 


38 




Clerks . . . . 


5,517 


21 




Books, printing, postage 








and supplies 


1,636 


94 




Telephone 


230 


03 




Carfares, etc. . 


29 


39 




Typewriter 


97 


20 




All other 


44 


30 




General: — 








Labor . . . . 


33,247 


88 




Pipe and fittings . 


1,460 


40 




Meters and fittings 


275 


27 




Hydrants and fittings 


672 


33 




Tools, equipment and re 








pairs 


1,476 


27 




Castings 


490 


28 




Automobiles and supplies 


5 2,255 


65 




Gasoline 


1,202 


11 




Horses, feed, shoeing, etc 


735 


11 




Kerosene 


389 


73 




Other materials and sup 








plies . . . . 


861 


00 




Power . . . . 


24 


45 




Freight and express 


21 


59 




Repairs of streets . 


99 


03 




All other 


170 


87 






$53,739 


42 




Less service transfers foi 








materials furnished otl 


ler 






accounts 


246 


50 


53,492 92 








Water Works Extension. 








Labor . . . . 


$1,418 79 




Teaming . 


191 


50 





Carried forward 



$1,610 29 $2,105,562 64 $130,718 54 



74 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brought forward 

Pipe and fittings 
Meters and fittings 
Tools and equipment . 
Trench work 



nance Water Buildings. 
Labor .... 
Fuel .... 

Light .... 

Furniture and furnishings . 
Heating apparatus and 

equipment 
Hardware and materials . 

Interest. 
Water Loans 



Reduction of Water Debt. 
Water Bonds 



Expenses 

$1,610 29 $2,105,562 64 

3,158 34 

912 68 

55 60 

449 50 

6,186 41 



Outlays 
$130,718 54 



t, Mainte 


i- 


$56 09 


470 


18 


291 


04 


1 


00 


24 


47 


22 


23 


$240 00 



$4,000 00 



Metropolitan Water Assessment. 

Assessment . . . $128,082 90 



865 01 
240 00 

4,000 00 

128,082 90 



OTHER ACCOUNTS. 



Temporary Loans. 

Loans in anticipation of 
revenue .... 

Real Estate Liens. 

Titles purchased by city . 

State Taxes. 

State .... 

Special State 
Non-Resident Bank . 
Boston Elevated Railway . 



$1,609,000 00 



$1,576 95 



$192,830 00 

11,569 80 

3,126 34 

169,593 77 



Metropolitan and Other Assessments. 

Metropolitan Park . . $50,517 52 



Metropolitan Sewer 
Wellington Bridge 
Grade Crossings 
State Highway 
Charles River Basin 
Alewife Brook . 

Carried forward 



88,244 86 
3,394 58 

11,551 75 
1,472 00 
7,917 24 
1,169 30 



1,609,000 00 



1,576 95 



377,119 91 



$164,267 25 $4,232,633 82 $130,718 54 



CITY AUDITOR. 



75 



Brought forward 



Expenses Outlays 

$164,267 25 $4,232,633 82 . $130,718 54 



Tellers' Overs and Shorts. 

Adjustments 



Abatement of Smoke 
Fire Prevention 
Soldiers' Exemption . 


As- 
sess- 

• 


357 

1,389 

307 


94 
80 
63 


166,322 62 
99,068 47 


County of Middlesex. 
County Tax, 1919 


$99,068 


47 


Cash Refunds. 

Taxes 

Highway Betterment 

sessment 
Street Sprinkling As5 

ment 
Water Rates 


$460 

19 

26 
103 


55 

36 

08 
01 



$77 84 



609 00 



77 84 



PRIVATE TRUST. 



Trust Fund Investment. 

Olive C. Cummings Fund 

Redemption of Tax Titles. 

Tax titles redeemed . 



Totals 
^Appropriation Refunds 



Total Cash Payments 



$578 82 



$2,159 21 



578 82 



2,159 21 



$4,501,449 78 $130,718 54 
1,918 93 13 87 



1,503,368 71 $130,732 41 
$4,634,101 12 



* Expenditures as shown in all accounts are net. 



76 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SCHEDULE OF PUBLIC PROPERTY. 





Land and 








School Buildings 


Buildings 


Personal 


Totals 


Prescott . 


$72,200 00 


$3,000 00 


$75,200 00 


East Somerville Junior 








High 


62,000 00 


2,000 


00 


64,000 00 


Hanscom . 


66,500 00 


4,000 


00 


70,500 00 


Davis 


53,500 00 


6,600 


00 


60,100 00 


Clark Bennett . 


54,500 00 


3,500 


00 


58,000 00 


Knapp 


50,000 00 


5,500 


00 


55,500 00 


Baxter .... 


34,200 00 


1,500 


00 


35,700 00 


Perry 


42,000 00 


1,500 


00 


43,500 00 


Bell and Southern Junlo 


r 








High .... 


130,000 00 


9,000 


00 


139,000 00 


Prospect Hill 


18,000 00 






18,000 00 


Pope .... 


78,600 00 


5*,i)*oo' 


0*6 


83,600 00 


Cummings 


13,400 00 


1,500 


00 


14,900 00 


Edgerly 


43,000 00 


5,000 


00 


48,000 00 


*High . . 


360,000 00 


30,000 


00 


390,000 00 


Glines 


88,400 00 


5,000 


00 


93,400 00 


Forster 


59,000 00 


8,000 


00 


103,000 00 


Forster (Annex) 


36,000 00 








t Proctor 


44,000 00 






44,000 00 


Bingham . 


73,000 00 


*5,'000' 


'6o 


78,000 00 


Morse 


54,000 00 


5,000 


00 


59,000 00 


Carr .... 


53,600 00 


4,500 


00 


63,100 00 


Girls' Industrial School 


4,000 00 
20,400 00 


1,000 
1,500 


00 
00 




Durell 


21,900 OO 


Burns 


39,000 00 


3,000 


00 


42,000 00 


Brown 


72,000 00 


2,600 


00 


74,600 00 


Highland . 


66,600 00 


5,000 


00 


71,600 00 


Lowe . . 


51,000 00 


2,000 


00 


53,000 00 


Hodgkins ... 


98,700 00 


5,000 


00 


103,700 00 


$West Somerville Junio: 


r 








High . 


80,000 00 


4,000 


00 


84,000 00 


Lincoln 


19,800 00 


1,000 


00 


20,800 00 


Cutler 


98,700 00 


10,000 


00 


108,700 00 



Total 



$2,036,100 00 $140,700 00 $2,176,800 00 



*Land included in Central Hill Park. 
tBuilding and fixtures. Land owned by State. 
{Land included in Holland Street Ledge. 



CITY AUDITOR. 



77 



Fire Buildings. 

New fire alarm building 

Central 

Engine Two 

Engine Six 

Hose Five 

Ladder One 

Hose Eight 

Ladder Two 

Engine Four 



Total .... $270,200 00 
♦Includes Electrical Department equipment. 



$27,500 00 


*$103,000 00 


$178,200 00 


47,700 00 






37,000 00 


15,000 00 


52,000 00 


29,000 00 


20,000 00 


49,000 00 


21,500 00 


7,500 00 


29,000 00 


60,000 00 


15,500 00 


75,500 00 


10,400 00 


7,700 00 


18,100 00 


17,600 00 


15,000 00 


32,600 00 


19,500 00 


7,000 00 


26,500 00 



$190,700 00 $460,900 00 



Libraries. 

tCentral 

East Somerville Branch 


$125,000 00 
24,400 00 
30,000 00 


$100,000 00 


$225,000 00 
24,400 00 


West Somerville Branch 


6,000 00 


36,000 00 


Total . 

Miscellaneou«s Buildings. 

Highway (stables, etc.) 

Sewer 

Contagious and Tuberculc 

sis Hospital 
City Home 
Police 
tCity Hall 
tCity Hall Annex 
Parks: — 
Broadway 


$179,400 00 

$55,000 00 
6,700 00 

45,900 00 
92,900 00 
64,300 00 
52,000 00 
62,000 00 

3,100 00 
3,000 00 
5,000 00 
1,800 00 
21,000 00 
46,700 00 


$106,000 00 

$30,000 00 
500 00 

9,000 00 
17,000 00 

8,000 00 

149,000 00 

12,500 00 


$285,400 00 

$85,000 00 
7,200 00 

54,900 00 
109,900 00 

72,300 00 
201,000 00 

74,500 00 

3,100 00 


Lincoln . . . . 
Bathhouse 


500 00 


3,500 00 
5,000 00 


Polling Booths . 




1,800 00 


Sanitary 
Water 


19,200 00 
6,500 00 


40,200 00 
53,200 00 


Total . . . . 
tLand included in Central I 

Parks and Playgrounds. 

Broadway . . . . 


$459,400 00 
lill Park. 

$421,200 00 

472,000 00 

84,500 00 

69,800 00 

109,000 00 

1,000 00 

5,100 00 

70,900 00 

17,300 00 

12,000 00 

5,500 00 

3,000 00 

3,000 00 

4,200 00 

40,000 00 


$252,200 00 


$711,600 00 
$421,200 00 


Central Hill 








472,000 00 


Lincoln 
Prospect Hill 
Tufts 


2,000 00 
1,500 00 


86,500 00 

71,300 00 

109,000 00 


Paul Revere 




1,000 00 


Belmont Street 




5,100 00 


City Field . 




70,900 00 


Glen Street 




17,300 00 


Kent Street 




12,000 00 


Poplar Street 




5,500 00 


Beacon Street . 




3,000 00 


Webster Avenue 




3,000 00 


Mason Street 




4,200 00 


Somerville Field 


20,000 00 


60,000 00 


Total . . . . 


$1,318,500 00 


$23,500 00 


$1,342,000 00 



78 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Miscellaneous Land. 
Ledge, Holland Street 


$54,500 00 
300 00 
400 00 
600 00 
100 00 
100 00 
2,100 00 
600 00 
400 00 
10,000 00 






$54,500 00 


Somerville Avenue 






300 00 


Putnam 






400 00 


Murdook Street 






600 00 


Lowell Street 






100 00 


Spencer Avenue 






100 00 


Weston Avenue 






2,100 00 


Endicott Avenue 






600 00 


Powder House Boulevard 






400 00 


Waltham Gravel Land 






10,000 00 










Total 


$69,100 00 

SUMMARY. 

Land and 
Buildings 

$2,036,100 00 

270,200 00 

179,400 00 

459,400 00 

1,318,500 00 

69,100 00 






$69,100 00 


School Buildings 
Fire Buildings . 
Libraries . 

Miscellaneous Buildings 
Parks and Playgrounds 
Miscellaneous Land . 


Personal 

$140,700 00 

190,700 00 

106,000 00 

252,200 00 

23,500 00 


Total 

$2,176,800 00 

460,900 00 

285,400 00 

711,600 00 

1,342,000 00 

69,100 00 










Total . 
Sewers (cost) . 
Water Works (cost) 


$4,332,700 00 
)perty 


$713,100 


00 


$5,045,800 00 
1,351,363 02 
1,073,196 79 


Total value public pre 


$7,469,059 81 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR 

OF TAXES. 



Somerville, Mass. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville : 

Gentlemen : — In presenting the annual report of the City 
Treasurer and Collector of Taxes for the year 1919, I respect- 
fully call attention to the following items of interest : 
The assessors' warrants amounted to . . . . $2,344,297 37 
The amount for 1918 was 2,053,862 53 



Showing an increase of ..... . $290,434 84 

With the larger amount to collect, the uncollected on 
December 31, 1919, for the current year's commitment was 
,119.91 less than on the corresponding date of the prior 



year, viz : 

1918 1919 

Taxes . . . . $365,013 39 $327,503 09 

Sprinkling . . . 8,145 35 6,535 99 

Moths .... 234 25 234 00 



$373,392 99 $334,273 08 $39,119 91 

The commitment of polls, because of the number of service 
men exempted, amounted to |616.00 less than in 1918. The col- 
lections however, were |3,716.00 more than for the correspond- 
ing period of the prior year. The personal taxes committed 
amounted to |81,527.52 more than in 1918 but the amount un- 
collected from this source was only |471.50 more than at the 
corresponding date in 1918. 

Your particular attention is called to the statement show- 
ing amounts paid on account of debt, including amounts paid 
on Metropolitan assessments, etc., and also the statement show- 
ing the total amount due on funded debt, both principal and 
interest. 

The amount paid for discount (including |1,215.00 to be 
paid in 1920 on coupon notes 73 and 74, interest to follow, pay- 
able semiannually) was |40,411.28. The amount for 1918 (in- 
cluding 15,269.50 on loans, interest to follow) was |53,813.41, 



80 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

the rates of interest paid in 1919 being less than in 1918 ac- 
counted for the saving of 112,402.13 on temporary loan inter- 
est. I estimate that for 1920 it will be necessary to borrow a 
larger amount than in 1919 and a higher rate of interest is 
likely to prevail. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph S. Pike^ 
City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 



CONDENSED CASH STATEMENT. 



RECEIPTS. PAYMENTS. 

Revenue . . $4,552,148 83 $4,506,640 77 

Non-Revenue . 42,751 90 127,460 35 



$4,594,900 73 $4,634,101 12 

Cash balance Janu- Cash balance De- 

ary 1, 1919 . . 239,996 16 cember 31, 1919 . 200,795 77 



$4,834,896 89 $4,834,896 89 



The assessor's warrant for the tax levy, assessed upon polls 
and property, April 1, 1919, including non-resident bank shares, 
amounted to |2,342,869.43 and the tax rate established was 
125.80 on each f 1000 of valuation, as follows : 

Real estate $73,297,500 00 

Personal estate 13,990,100 00 

Resident bank shares .... 65,824 00 



Total valuation .... $87,353,424 00 
At a rate of $25.80 .... $2,253,718 34 

Polls, 23,843 at $2.00 .... 47,686 00 

Non-resident bank shares to be paid to 

the State (valuation $121,176.00 . 3,126 34 



$2,304,530 68 
Street Sprinkling .... 36,991 25 

Suppression of moths .... 1,347 50 







$2,342,869 43 


Additional Assessments: 






Personal estate, valuation $39,300 at 






$25.80 


$1,013 94 




Polls, 207 at $2 


414 00 


1,427 94 



Total commitments by assessors . $2,344,297 37 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



8i- 



$1,309,500 00 



Bonds outstanding January 1, 1920, with interest to 
maturity. 

Bonds Interest 

Water Loan Bonds $2,000 00 $80 00 

Emergency Loan Bonds 15,000 00 1,275 00 

Metropolitan Park Loan Bonds 10,000 00 1,925 00 

Bridge Loan Bonds 30,000 00 15,750 00 

Sewer Loan Bonds 257.000 00 75,090 00 

City Loan Bonds 397,500 00 67,865 00 

Municipal Loan Bonds 31,000 00 3,420 00 

Highway Loan Bonds 289,000 00 33,602 50 

Public Building Loan Bonds 278,000 00 88,180 00 



$287,187 50 



Yearly Bond Maturities with Interest. 

Date Due 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923.... 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 

1937 

1938 

1939 

1940 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 



Principal 


Interest 


Total 


$211,500 00 


$49,508 75 


$261,008 75 


189,500 00 


41,431 25 


230,931 25 


159,500 00 


34,231 25 


193,731 25 


120,500 00 


28,346 25 


148,846 25 


96,500 00 


23,731 25 


120,231 25 


83,000 00 


20,143 75 


103,143 75 


69.000 OU 


17,078 75 


86,078 75 


59,000 00 


14,441 25 


73,441 25 


51,000 00 


12,188 75 


63,188 75 


49,000 00 


10,156 25 


59,156 25 


42,000 00 


8,291 25 


• 50,291 25 


38,000 00 


6,688 75 


44,688 75 


33,000 00 


5.246 25 


38,246 25 


23,000 00 


3.978 75 


26,978 75 


23,000 00 


3,051 25 


26,051 25 


16.000 00 


2,223 75 


18,223 75 


11,000 00 


1,673 75 


12,673 75 


11,000 00 


1,221 25 


12,221 25 


5,000 00 


808 75 


5,808 75 


4,000 00 


636 25 


4,636 25 


3,000 00 


■ 501 25 


3,501 25 


2,000 00 


403 75 


2,403 75 


2,000 00 


326 25 


2,326 25 


2.000 00 


248 75 


2,248 75 


1.000 00 


192 50 


1,192 50 


1.000 00 


157 50 


1,157 50 


1.000 00 


122 50 


1.122 50 


1.000 00 


87 50 


1,087 50 


1.000 00 


52 50 


1,052 50 


1.000 00 


17 50 


1,017 50 


JBl.309.500 00 


$287,187 50 


$1,596,687 50 



82 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

MEMORANDUM OF PAYMENTS ON ACCOUNT OF DEBT, 1919. 

Principal Interest Total 

Bonds, General City Debt $232,500 00 $57,308 75 $289,808 75 

Bonds, Water 4,000 00 240 00 4,240 00 

Temporary Loans 44,465 78 44,465 78 

Grade Crossings 10,260 00 1,291 75 11,551 75 

On account of Metro. 
Dist. Debt: 

Sewers 19,983 71 31,174 43 51,158 14 

Park 3,587 05 12,881 65 16,468 70 

Wellington Bridge 1,265 00 328 90 1,593 90 

Charles River Basin 265 20 3,246 27 3,511 47 

Alewife Brook 818 39 350 91 . 1,169 30 

Water 16,023 68 78,335 58 94,359 26 

$288,703 03 $229,624 02 $518,327 05 

Somerville's proportion 
for debt requirements: 

In State Tax $27,991 21 $32,952 61 $60,943 82 

In County Tax 3,912 25 2,581 23 6,493 48 

$320,606 49 $265,157 86 $585,764 35 



GRADE CROSSING DEBT. 
(Carried by Commonwealth). 



Decrees entered .... 

Paid Commonwealth 

Deduct interest included in above 



Payable 



Nov. 15, 1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 



$117,260 61 
20,583 51 


$120,097 10 
96,677 10 


$23,420 00 


Principal 

$8,280 00 
7,380 00 
4,380 00 
3,380 00 


Interest 

$891 80 
576 60 
294 40 
127 20 


$23,420 00 


$1,890 00 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



83 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 1919. 

$17,715 00 

90 00 



Appropriated in budget 
Transfer, Order approved December 
30th 



Salaries: 

Treasurer and Collector . 

Deputy Collector 

Cashiers .... 

Clerks .... 

Stationery, postage and books 

Printing and Advertising 

Carriage hire, car fares, auto hire 

etc. .... 

Telephone 
Surety bonds 
Advertising and recording tax sales 
Sundries . . . 



Balance 







$17,805 00 


$3,603 


10 




1,700 


63 




2,121 


00 




6,351 


74 




1,622 


12 




781 


36 




75 


11 




158 


44 




505 


00 




604 


35 




278 


05 




$17,800 


90 




4 


10 


$17,805 00 







REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 
CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



School Committee Kooms, January 2, 1920.. 

Ordered, that the annual report of the Superintendent be 
adopted as the annual report of the Board of School Com- 
mittee, it being understood that such adoption does not com- 
mit the Board to the opinions or recommendations made there- 
in; that it be incorporated in the reports of the City Officers; 
and that 1,000 copies be printed separately. 

Charles S. Clark, 

Secretary of School Board. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



8.J 



Herbert Cholerton 
Daniel H. Bradley 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1919. 



Members. 



. Chairman 
Vice-chairman 



EX-OFFICIIS. 

Term Expires 
January 

Charles W. Eldridge, Mayor, 47 Highland road 1920 
Enoch B. Robertson, President Board of Aldermen, 87 Highland rd. 1920 

WARD ONE. 

46-A Franklin street 1920 

125 Pearl street 1921 

WARD TWO. 

19 Concord avenue 1920 

88 Concord avenue 1921 

WARD THREE. 

69 Avon street 1920 

21 Pleasant avenue 1921 

WARD FOUR. 

281 Broadway 1920 

22 Walter street 1921 

WARD FIVE. 

283 Highland avenue 1920 

56 Dartmouth street 1921 

WARD SIX. 

191 Summer street 1920 

97 Rogers avenue 1921 

WARD SEVEN. 

43 Ossipee road 1920 

94 College avenue 1921 



James J. Rudd, 

Dr. Winnifred P. Davis, 

Daniel H. Bradley, 
Christopher J. Muldoon, 

Alfred L. West, 
Oscar W. Codding, 

Edgar F. Sewall, 
Frank H. Holmes, 

Harry M. Stoodley, 
*Mrs. Blanche E. Herbert, 

Paul S. Burns, 
William M. Morrison, 

Frank E. Porter, 
Herbert Cholerton, 



* Resig-ned Oct. 27, 1919. 

Superintendent of Schools. 
Charles S. Clark. 

Office: City Hall Annex, Highland avenue. 

Residence: 75 Munroe street. 

The Superintendent's office will be open on school days from 8 to 5; 
Saturdays, 8 to 10. His office hour Is 4 o'clock on school days, and 
8:30 on Saturdays. 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools. 
Joseph A. Ewart. 

Residence: 11 Bigelow street. 
Office hour: 4 o'clock on school days. 
Superintendent's office force: — 
Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland avenue. 
Mildred A. Merrill, 26 Camhria street. 
H. Madeline Kodad, 1067 Broadway. 
Arline P. Hall, 189 Pearl street. 



Board Meetings. 
January 27. April 28. September 29. 

February 24. May 26. October 27. 

March 31. June 30. November 24. 

8:15 o'clock. 



December 26. 
January 2, 1920. 



86 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES, 1919. 
NOTE. — The member first named is chairman. 
District I. — Rudd, Dr. Davis, Muldoon. 

PRESCOTT, HANSCOM, BENNETT. 

District II. — Bradley, Muldoon, Codding. 

KNAPP, PERRY, BAXTER. 

District III. — West, Codding, Dr. Davis. 

POPE, CUMMINGS. 

District IV. — Sewall, Holmes, Mrs. Herbert. 

EDGERLY, GLINES. 

District V. — ^Stoodley, Mrs. Herbert, Sewall. 

FORSTEB, BINGHAM. 

District VI. — Burns, Morrison, Stoodley. 

CARB, MORSE, PROCTOR, DURELL, BURNS, BROWN. 

District VII. — Porter, Cholerton, Burns. 

HIGHLAND, CUTLER, LINCOLN, LOWE. 

High School. — Bradley, West, Dr. Davis, Holmes, Stoodley, Morrison, 
Cholerton, 

Finance. — Stoodley, Rudd, Bradley, Codding, Sewall, Burns, Cholerton, 
Eldridge, Robertson. 

Text-Books and Courses of Study. — Muldoon, Dr. Davis, West, Sewall, 
Mrs. Herbert, Morrison, Porter. 

Industrial Education. — ^Holmes, Rudd, Muldoon, West, Stoodley, Burns, 
Porter. 

School Accommodations. — Porter, Codding, Rudd, Bradley, Holmes, 
Mrs. Herbert, Morrison, Eldridge, Robertson. 

Teachers. — Cholerton, Bradley, Dr. Davis, Codding, Burns. 

Playgrounds and School Hygiene. — Dr. Davis, Muldoon, Sewall, Mrs. 

Herbert, Morrison. 
RXiles and Regulations. — Codding, Muldoon, Porter. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



To the School Committee of Somervllle: 

The 48th Annual Report of the Superintendent of Schools 
is respectfully submitted. The conditions for the year just 
closing are given and comparisons are made with other years 
sufficient to show the relation of present conditions with those 
which have gone before. The statistics are taken, unless other- 
wise stated, from the report of the State Board of Education 
for the school year ending June 30, 1919, and do not include 
facts relating to vocational schools. 

Membership. 

The size of the school problem for the year is best shown 
by the average membership which is 12,643 pupils, an increase 
of 75 pupils during the year. This membership is distributed 
among twelve grades and the kindergarten. The ninth grade 
or third year of the Junior High School and the tenth, eleventh, 
and twelfth grades of the Senior High School contain 2361 pu- 
pils of this average membership. In other words if there were 
no Junior High Schools these 2361 pupils would be in the four 
year high school organization in the High School building. 
This would be 700 pupils more than the present number in 
the High School, and at least 500 more than ought to be in at- 
tendance at one time in that building. This large number of 
pupils in the High School section of the school organization is 
caused in part by the fact that the elimination of the ninth 
grade which as is shown elsewhere in this report had been 
under way for a number of A^ears, brought into the High School 
grades in September, 1918, an extra unit. This increase will 
continue until June, 1922, when this extra unit will pass out of 
the High School and thus out of the school system. This event 
will complete the elimination of the thirteenth year of the 
school organization and will reduce proportionally the total 
membership of the schools. The reduction thus resulting will 
occur in the High School alone and will not affect the situation 
in the grades below the High School. 

Teachers. 

During the present fiscal year 45 teachers have 'resigned, 
10 to be married, 16 to accept better paying positions elsewhere. 
Of this number, two went to New York, two to Boston, one to 



88 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

^"ewtoiij nine to take positions of higher rank, and two to take 
better paying positions in business. 

Fifty-two teachers have been appointed, including a ma- 
tron in the High School. These new teachers were distributed 
as follows : High School, 14 ; Junior High Schools, 20 ; ele- 
mentary schools, 18. All had professional training and experi- 
ence. Nineteen were college graduates, twenty-five graduates 
of normal schools, three of kindergarten normal training 
schools, four graduates of commercial schools, and one, the ma- 
tron, an employee holding a similar position in business. 

Somerville graduates of state normal schools or of college 
courses in education are given an opportunity to get one year's 
training as an apprentice-teacher after graduation, in order to 
qualify for a permanent position. At the end of this period 
they are eligible for consideration with all others for appoint- 
ment to any existing vacancy. Most of this number are ap- 
pointed to positions in the schools. This source, however, sup- 
plies only a fraction of the total number of new teachers 
needed. The remainder must be sought in other communities. 
To induce them to make the change better pay or more advan- 
tageous teaching conditions must be offered. 

On the other hand, so long as there are communities which 
pay higher salaries than Somerville it is inevitable that some 
losses will occur for this reason. The probability of such losses, 
however, is very greatly reduced by the salarj^ increases given 
our teachers this year. The increases pending and made during 
the year amount to $550 per annum for a large majority of the 
teachers, and f 500 for all others. 

Increase of Pay. 

In January the School Committee voted to increase the 
pay of all elementary, junior high, and vocational women 
teachers |50 per year and to raise the pay of cadets from |200 
to |400 per year. In June the Committee voted to increase the 
pay of all teachers flOO to begin September, 1919, and to in- 
crease the maximum of elementary teachers to fllOO. A new 
salary scale for teachers in the high and elementary schools 
was adopted at the June meeting. This new scale includes the 
increases of pay granted by the Board during the year and has 
features which are more advantageous to the teachers than the 
old schedule. The minimum pay of elementary teachers was 
raised to |700 and the maximum to |1100. In the November 
meeting the School Committee passed a vote requesting His 
Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen to provide funds 
for an increase for all teachers of |400 per annum. Thus in 
one year, the School Committee raised the salaries of all women 
teachers in the elementary and Junior high schools |150 per an- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 89 

nnm and fixed the maximum salary at |1100, |200 in excess of 
the maximum in effect January 1, and it has voted to ask for 
money to enable it to give a general increase of |400 per annum 
to all teachers to date from the first of the new year. With the 
increase now pending the maximum will be |1500. 

School Accommodations. 

In the June meeting of this year the School Committee 
adopted a recommendation presented by the Committee on 
School Accommodations asking the Mayor and the Board of 
Aldermen for additional accommodations in each of the 
junior high school centers and for a gymnasium for the use 
of the high school. The action proposed was intended to meet 
not only pressing immediate needs but also to prepare at least 
for the demands of the next five years. The Prescott and 
Southworth school buildings provide accommodation for the 
Eastern Junior High School and for the first four elementary 
grades. Four rooms in the Prescott school are used for the lat- 
ter purpose. As was predicted last spring, it has been neces- 
sary this fall to put classes on half time in the Hanscom and 
the Prescott schools. The Edgerly and the Glines schools are 
full and there is no prospect of relief in this region until addi- 
tional accommodations are provided. At the Southern Junior 
High Scliool there are three classes in excess of the number of 
rooms. Afternoon classes have provided a way for relieving 
this situation. In the Western Junior High School there are 
five classes in excess of the number of rooms in the new build- 
ing and the Hodgkins building combined. Every available 
room is used for classroom purposes and classes are held regu- 
larly in the corridors. Afternoon classes here have relieved the 
situation. It will be necessary to continue to have such classes 
until additions are made to the plant. At the Northern Junior 
High School every room is used and afternoon classes are held. 
Twelve classes are conducted in the Folsom building, although 
it was originally planned for only six. All rooms in the Fors- 
ter building are used, including the basement ward room. Four 
rooms are used by six elementary grades. 

The high school building is fully occupied. By transfer- 
ring the Girls' Vocational School to the high school building, 
three rooms were occupied in the basement of the East build- 
ing, one a domestic science room, the others small rooms ad- 
joining. While there are many vacant sittings in the high 
school, the building is so filled as to make any variation from 
the present program of exercises which calls for additional 
room impossible. 

There are now three half-time classes in the Hanscom 
school and two in the Prescott. Two more would have been 



90 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

necessary in the Hanscom but for the fact that a whole class 
was transferred from the Hanscom to the Pope school to oc- 
cupy a room made vacant by transferring a class therefrom to 
the Bennett school. Although both changes were made for the 
express purpose of avoiding as far as possible making half-time 
classes, there was considerable objection from mam^ parents 
affected by the action. 

It will be interesting in this connection to review what has 
been done in the last few years in the matter of providing addi- 
tional accommodations for the schools. It appears from the 
records that the problem of over-crowding has constantly de- 
manded attention. In the school report for 1907 an earnest 
plea was made for additions to the High School to include 
among other things thoroughly equipped gymnasiums for both 
sexes, a suitable lunch room, and an assembly room large 
enough to accommodate the entire school. The following were 
also recommended: a six room addition to the Perry School 
in AVard Two ; a rearrangement of several rooms in the Carr 
School ; and a twelve or fifteen room building with an am^jhi 
assembly hall for Ward Seven on Holland Street. No part ot* 
this program was carried into effect until 1912 when a twelve 
room building was erected in Ward Seven, on Powder House 
Boulevard. 

In 1913 the overcrowding of the High School had become 
so great as to necessitate the adoption of the two-session plan. 
In this year thirty rooms and an assembly room were added to 
the plant. While this addition was considerable in size and 
cost, it was recognized at the time that a final settlement of 
the problem of high school accommodations had not been 
achieved. 

In January, 1915, the School Committee adopted a report 
of the Committee on School Accommodations asking for a 
schoolhouse of thirty rooms, with a playground large enough 
for fifteen hundred pupils, to be built adjoining the Edgerly 
School, and also for an addition of twelve rooms to the Cutler 
School. As a result of these recommendations six rooms were 
added to the Cutler School and were occupied in September, 
and a nine room building was started on land adjoining the 
Prescott School. 

In 1916 the High School again became overcrowded having 
an attendance of over two thousand pupils. In certain schools 
in the western and central parts of the city the attendance ex- 
ceeded the capacity of the buildings. There was a general de- 
mand tliat something should be done to relieve this over- 
crowdedness, and one remedy proposed was a new high school 
building in West Somerville. Early in 1916 His Honor, the 
Mayor, asked the School Committee to inform him whether ad- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 91 

ditional school accommodations were needed, and if so, to what 
extent, and in what locality. After due consideration, in which 
opportunity was given the public to express its opinions, the 
School Committee agreed upon a plan to meet the immediate 
and future needs of the city so far as schoolhouse construction 
is concerned. This plan was embodied in the following resohi- 
tion: 

Resolved : It is the judgment of the School Committee that 
a system of Junior High Schools for Somerville should be es- 
tablished to consist eventually of four units ; one in the West- 
ern part of the city on Holland Street, one at the Forster 
School in the Northern section of the city, one at the Prescott 
School in the Eastern section of the city, and a unit to be 
erected in the Southern part of the city, preferably adjacent 
to the Bell Schoolhouse. It is the sense of the Committee that 
provision be made, not only for the construction of the pro- 
posed building in the Western section, but also for the acquisi- 
tion at the present time of the vacant land adjacent to the 
present Bell School lot on Vinal Avenue, it being understood 
that the School Board is committed in its opinion to the future 
development of this whole project. 

During 1916 appropriation was made for a Junior High 
School building to be erected on the ledge lot on Holland 
Street, West Somerville, and a lot of land 65x117 feet on Vinal 
Avenue adjacent to the Bell Schoolhouse, was bought as a site 
for a Junior High School. In September of this year, the 
Southworth building was opened as a Junior High School, and 
a Junior High School was opened in the Forster School. As a 
result of these two events one hundred sixty-nine pupils of the 
tenth grade, who were eligible to enter the High School were 
retained in the Junior High School. This act reduced the mem- 
bership of the Senior High School and somewhat relieved 
crowding there. The opening of the Southworth building also 
gave relief to the Glines, Edgerly, and Hanscom schools, whicli 
had been overcrowded for more than a year before that time. 
Provisions were made during this year for an addition of con- 
siderable size to the Boys' Vocational School. 

In September, 1917, a new schoolhouse was opened on Hol- 
land Street for the use of the Western Junior High School. 
This building contained eleven classrooms and -four basement 
rooms for practical arts classes. During the construction of 
this building, owing to the increased cost of materials, it was 
decided to reduce the size of the structure by the omission of a 
part that was included in the original plan. The building was 
occupied in September and was immediately filled, activities of 
the school occupying every room and temporary rooms created 
by partitioning off part of the corridors. During this year a 



92 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

13art of the Hodgkins School was used for Junior High School 
purposes and the remainder for Elementar}- School purposes. 
At the close of 1917, there was a clear understanding that addi- 
tions to the Eastern and Western Junior High Schools were 
needed, and that at least six rooms should be provided for each 
school at tlie earliest possible moment. During this year an 
appropriation was made for the construction of a Junior High 
School building on Vinal Avenue. 

In 1918 an addition to the Bell Schoolhouse was finished, 
and occupied in September. This building contained nine 
classrooms and three rooms for special uses. A building fifty- 
eight feet by sixty-two feet was completed on Glen Street ad- 
joining the Davis Schoolhouse. This building is used for an 
automobile shop for the Boys' Vocational School. 

Although these additions have been made to the school- 
houses, the present condition is that there are half-time classes 
in the Eastern section of the city, and afternoon classes in each 
of three of the Junior High Schools. 

Action alreadv described has been taken bv the School 
Committee during the present year, with a view to meeting the 
present needs of the schools and of providing for their future 
expansion. 

High School. 

The High School had a full four grade organization during 
the school year ending June 30th, 1919. All departments of 
the school were conducted under conditions more nearly nor- 
mal than those which have prevailed for several years. The 
emotional strain of the War was relaxed during this year; 
there was a release from the calls for assistance from outside 
organizations ; teachers and pupils worked with their minds 
occupied with the business of the school. A successful year's 
work was the result. There were graduated from the school in 
June 310 pupils, of whom 93 entered higher institutions on 
certificate or examination. 18 different colleges are repre- 
sented in the list. 18 boys went to Tufts college, 21 pupils went 
to Normal Schools, and 23 entered Boston University. 

The graduates of the Commercial Course all found posi- 
tions in business offices soon after graduation. They are filling 
places as typists, stenographers, clerks, and bookkeepers, and 
graduates of this course are in demand to fill responsible posi- 
tions. Reference to the report of Headmaster John A. Avery 
will show additional particulars attesting the success of the 
High School in preparing its graduates for subsequent success. 

Junior High Schools. 

The school year ending last June was the first in which the 
junior high schools were operated with provisions made for all 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 93 

parts of the city. All the problems of administration of the 
new enterprise had been met in a competent manner and the 
program of studies had been carefully arranged and had been 
applied by teachers whose experience and skill assured efficient 
instruction. An admirable school spirit had been developed 
among teachers and pupils. A large degree of co-operation had 
been secured from the parents of the pupils and thriving and 
enthusiastic Parent-Teacher Associations had been formed in 
several of the schools. The junior high schools had come "into 
vigorous, confident, and capable being. The institution had 
met all the conditions which the public and the School Com- 
mittee expected it to do, when, in 1916, they adopted it as the 
means best adapted to satisfy the various difficult conditions 
then confronting them. In the short interval of three years 
the transition from the old system to the new had been made 
all over the city, three new school buildings had been opened, 
the high school and elementary schools had been relieved of 
overcrowding, and the new organization had been completed 
and successfully operated. That this is a creditable record and 
one of which the city may well be proud is shown by the atten- 
tion which this undertaking has received from other communi- 
ties. School Boards, Superintendents of Schools, principals, 
and teachers have visited these schools during this time to 
study the plan of organization and to see how it works in prac- 
tice. Favorable comment in conversation, in letters, and in 
press notices has been frequent. Among the visitors during 
this year have been School Committeemen and the Superinten- 
dent of Schools from one of the largest cities of the State, 
which is now about to change from the nine year elementary 
and four year high school system to the six year elementary, 
three year junior high, and three year senior high school plan, 
with four junior high schools. This junior high school plan is 
now in operation in eleven cities and twenty-four towns in this 
state and in several others is being considered for early adop 
tion. Other cities have adopted part of the junior high school 
idea by gathering together the pupils of the highest grammar 
grade and giving them a program of studies conducted on the 
departmental plan. All of these movements are indicative of 
a recognition of the fact that present day conditions make im- 
perative the giving of a broader educational opportunity to 
pupils of the pre-adolescent age. 

The present need for additional accommodations should 
not be regarded as a consequence of the establishment of junior 
high schools. It was clearly set forth and generally understood 
in 1916 that more accommodations must be provided in the 
near future. Among other reasons for adopting the junior high 
school plan was that this plan concentrated in four centers 



94 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

building operations which would benefit the whole city. The 
two buildings authorized since the adoption of this plan, the 
Western and the Southern, were both smaller than the need& 
of the schools, but were provided with the idea of later adding 
other units of construction to make an adequate provision for 
the needs of the city. For more detailed information about the 
junior high schools the report should be read which Mr. Ewart, 
the Assistant Superintendent of Schools, has prepared at my 
request and which I submit as a part of this report. 

Elementary Schools. 

This term now applies to the first six grades as distin- 
guished from those above the sixth year. These schools are in 
better physical condition than ever before, because, with the 
exceptions already noted in this report, the elementary schools 
are not crowded and the number of pupils to a teacher has been 
reduced in many cases. These schools are taught by experi- 
enced and competent women, many of whom have long been in 
the service of the city. The elementary schools are supervised 
and administered by supervising principals who were formerly 
grammar school masters or were instructors in other respon- 
sible positions. The problem of these grades is to develop the 
child physically, morally, and mentally, and to instruct him in 
the rudiments of knowledge. This is in some respects the most 
important part of the school undertaking. It is therefore fit- 
ting that it should have its needs met most fully. Such, in 
general, is the case now. In accommodations, in principals and 
teachers, in equipment and supplies, the elementary schools are 
better prepared to do their work than ever before. 

* Boys' Vocational School. 

Nine boys were graduated from this school in June. The 
boys immediately found profitable employment in industry. 
Now the school has the largest membership in its history and 
three departments in good working order. During the war vo- 
cational schools throughout the State fell off in membership 
but this year new interest has been shown by a general increase 
in attendance. 

Girls' Vocational School. 

Nine girls were graduated from this school last June. In 
the fall there was an unexpected falling off in attendance at 
the school. After consultation with the Deputy Commissioner 
of Education of the State of Massachusetts, it was decided to 
be desirable to continue the school but to reduce the corps of 
teachers to correspond with the reduced membership. As a 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 95 

means of further reduction of cost, it was decided to transfer 
the school to the high school building, where there were a large 
domestic science room and two small rooms in the basement of 
the East building which had not been in use since September. 
The school was established in these rooms in October under the 
charge of the director. One teacher of domestic science is em- 
ployed; one period a day instruction in English is given by a 
high school teacher, and instruction in dressmaking and draw- 
ing is given in high school classes. This school assists in the 
preparation of food for the high school lunch rooms, both of 
which are under the direction of the principal of the Girls' Vo- 
cational School. 

Cost. 

The cost of schools is increasing though not so fast as that 
of living in general. The chief item of expense for support ot* 
the schools is salaries of teachers. This item grows through 
the automatic, longevity increases afforded by the salary sched- 
ule, through general increases made by the School Committee, 
and through additions of salaries for new undertakings. Other 
large items are cost of text books and supplies, operation of 
school plant including janitor service and the cost of repairs 
and upkeep. 

The details of these expenditures for the last school year 
are given in tables which form a part of this report. These 
show the cost for the last school year and give opportunity for 
comparisons with other years. How Somerville ranks with 
other cities in the State is shown in a report of the Board of 
Education for the school year 1917-18, the latest figures avail- 
able for such a comparison. Somerville is the tenth city in 
population, but is eighth in the number of pupils in the average 
membership. Seven cities only had a larger average member- 
ship. 

In expenditures for salaries of teachers Somerville is sev- 
enth, one above its rank in membership. In expenditures for 
text books it is sixth, two above its rank ; in supplies fifth, three 
above its rank ; in fuel sixth, two above its rank ; in janitor 
service ninth, one below its rank ; in general control or adminis- 
tration twelfth, or four below its rank. 

A comparison of the cost of these items per pupil in the 
average membership in our schools with the average for the 
cities and towns of the state show the following facts : 

Salaries of teachers, Somerville |30.55, State |32.62. 

Expenditures for text books and supplies, Somerville $2.15, 
State 12.27. 

Operation School plant, including janitor service and fuel, 
Somerville |5.59, State f 7.09. 



96 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Expenditures for administration, Somerville |0.98, State 
.f2.03. 

There has been an increase of 775 in the average member- 
ship of the schools notwithstanding the fact that in 1910 the 
number of beginners was cut down more than one half by 
raising the age of admission to the first grade one year and 
this reduction has been operative since that year. 

The increase in cost of teaching has been from f 22.69 to 
130.55. 

The maximum salary of the elementary teacher in 1907 
was 1650 ; in |1917 f 900. 

Additional activities had been established and the change 
of residence of a portion of the school attendance necessitated 
opening new schools without closing old ones, although re- 
ducing the number of pupils per teacher in the latter. 

The cost of books and supplies increased from fl.40 to 
.|2.15. This change is due in part to the general increase of 
cost of all materials and in part to broadening the work in 
industrial and commercial subjects. 

General control, or administration, has risen from 17 
cents to 98 cents. The average for the State in 1907 was 
11.67, in 1917 |2.03. 

In 1907 the Superintendent of Schools recommended the 
employment of a man to have charge of the business of the 
School Committee. Since 1917 State laws and municipal regu- 
lations have imposed additional business and clerical work, 
and the addition of school activities such as vocational schools, 
junior high schools, domestic science, special schools, Ameri- 
canization work, war work, etc., have greatly added to ad- 
ministrative and business work, the whole making a volume 
at least three times greater than that of 1907. Legislation of 
1919 will add to that volume in connection with establishing 
and conducting continuation schools and an enlarged pro 
gram of Americanization work. 



Review. 

This examination of comparative cost statistics suggests 
a review of the changes which have been made in school ac- 
tivities in the same period. In the school report for 1907, 
Superintendent Southworth made the following specific recom- 
mendations for the improvement of the schools: The exten- 
sion of high school accommodations to include enlargement 
of the high school plant to afford suitable quarters for manual 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 97 

training with a view to its extension, enlarged facilities for 
commercial work, more room for the library, thoroughly 
equipped gymnasiums for both sexes, additional room for the 
chemistry and physics departments, facilities for the teaching 
of domestic science, a suitable lunch room accessible to both 
schools, larger book and supply rooms, and an assembly room 
large enough to accommodate an entire school; the enlarge- 
ment of the Perry Schoolhouse by the addition of six rooms ; 
the erection of a twelve or fifteen room building on the city 
le-'ige lot in Ward Seven, with an ample assembly hall for 
public as well as school convenience; the employment of ad- 
ditional teachers in the Latin School; the awakening of public 
interest in playgrounds for children; the employment of an 
additional truant officer; the extension of manual training, 
to include the eighth and ninth grades ; the employment of two 
nurses in connection with the medical inspection of schools; 
the employment of an instructor of physical training for the 
high schools ; the extension of supervision by grammar mas- 
ters, to include the smaller schools; the gradual reduction of 
the number of pupils assigned to a teacher; the employment 
of extra teachers for backward children ; changes in the 
methods of school administration, by the employment of a man 
to transact the business of the School Board. Concerning 
these recommendations Mr. Southworth said "In reviewing 
this report I find that it contains an unusual number of recom- 
mendations. Further consideration of them, however, leads to 
the conviction that their adoption is largely a matter of time. 
If they could be made at once the schools would be greatly 
benefited." 

Among the changes which have been made since 1907 many 
of these recommendations have been carried into effect. The 
high school plant has been enlarged and an auditorium pro- 
vided ; the Cutler school building has been provided, filling 
the need in West Somerville as then foreseen, with the excep- 
tion of the auditorium ; additional teacheys have been pro- 
vided in the college preparatory course of the high school ; 
the School Committee has assisted in the development of the 
supervised summer playgrounds which are now under the 
management of the Recreation and Playground Commission. 
Supervised play is part of the physical training program of the 
schools. In 1919 the School Committee employed an additional 
attendance officer. The Junior High School presents to boys a 
broader opportunity for instruction in manual training. Two 
nurses are now employed by the Board of Health, subject to the 
direction of the School Committee. In 1914 an instructor in 
physical training was employed for high and elementary 
schools. A director is now employed part time and an assistant 



98 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

teacher full time. While physical training is not now compelled 
by law, legislation to that effect is being urged with increased 
strength. In connection with the opening of the junior high 
schools the supervision of all elementary schools has been or 
ganized in nine supervisory districts, each under the charge of 
a grammar school master. A reduction of the number of pupils 
per teacher in the elementary schools has been made wherever 
there has been a sufficiency of schoolroom. Since 1910 three 
classes have been formed for children retarded in mental devel- 
opment. A state law, passed in 1919, makes compulsory the es- 
tablishment at the beginning of the school year 1920 of special 
classes to give to children, three or more years retarded in 
mental development, instruction adapted to their mental 
development, under regulations prescribed by the Board of 
Education. The recommendation that the school administra- 
tion be improved by the employment of a man has been met and 
other additions made to meet the increase of work. 

Other important changes have been made in harmony with 
the prevailing educational thought and demand. In 1910 the 
Committee voted to reduce the elementary course from nine 
to eight years. The Commissioner of Education in his report 
for 1919 says "It is apparent that the ninth year of the ele 
mentary school is fast disappearing, and that the eight-year 
course, now most common, is being replaced in many instances 
by an elementary course of six years, and a Junior High School 
course of two or three years." The beginners who entered 
school in September, 1910, were started on an eight-year ele- 
mentary course and entered the High School in 1918 as the 
third year class in the Junior High Schools. As the Commit- 
tee had at the time of voting the eliminating of the ninth grade 
raised the age of admission to the first grade, the average age 
of entering the high school was not reduced by that action. In 
making this change, the Committee was clearly in step with the 
times, though ahead of communities which have since done 
the same thing, and of others which have it yet to do. 

In 1910 the Committee opened a vocational school for boys, 
and in 1911 one for girls. The providing of vocational schools 
was demanded by local sentiment. One half of the mainte- 
nance cost of these schools has been met by the State. Since 
1918 the National Government has contributed a substantial 
sum towards the maintenance of Vocational Education. The 
present arrangement is that the city and state divide equall}^ 
maintenance cost after deducting from the gross expenses the 
amount paid by the National Government. 

A beginning in teaching domestic science was made in the 
Forster Intermediate School in 1914. It is now taught in the 
four Junior High Schools and in the High School. The State 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 99 

legislature in 1919 made compulsory, in towns of over 20,000 
inhabitants, the teaching of ^'household arts as a part of both 
its elementary and its High School system." 

In 1910 a dental dispensary was opened to give treatment 
to pupils who could not afford to pay the charge for profes- 
sional service. This action was urged by local practitioners 
and was regarded as an important step forward in the inter- 
est of the health and well-being of children. 

Other measures for the improvement of the schools, not 
elsewhere discussed in this review include the employment of a 
librarian, a teacher coach, and a matron in the High School, 
the consolidation of two high schools into one general high 
school, with highly developed courses of instruction, the estab- 
lishment of Junior High Schools with broadened courses for 
children of intermediate ages, and a progressive increasing of 
salaries of teachers, principals, and other workers in the 
schools. 

Teachers' Salaries. 

The most notable occurrence of the present -year has been 
the recognition given to the fact that teachers were underpaid 
and were deserving of a substantial increase in their pay. Pub- 
lic opinion throughout the Nation became aroused upon this 
matter with the result that communities everywhere made un- 
precedented advances in expenditures for this account. Som- 
erville, as usual, kept step with the progressive communities, 
and made generous increases in teachers' salaries. 

This recognition of their needs has brought to the teachers 
a welcome relief from financial anxieties. For this improved 
condition they are deeply appreciative and grateful. That they 
will justify in their work this expression of public regard I 
have not the slightest doubt. 

New Legislation. 

As a result of State Legislation and of a Keferendum sub- 
mitted to the voters of Somerville, it has been decided that 
continuation schools shall be established and maintained in 
this city at the beginning of the next school year. The law 
prescribes in some detail the general conditions to govern the 
establishment and conduct of these schools. It is provided 
that the schools and courses of instruction shall be subject to 
approval by the Board of Education and that with such ap- 
proval granted reimbursement shall be made from the Treas- 
ury of the Commonwealth to an amount equal to one-half the 
total sum raised by local taxation and expended for the mainte- 
nance of such schools. 

The establishment of these schools will require careful 



100 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

planning and the provision of suitable teaching and supervising 
corps. In order that all arrangements should be completed by 
the first of the new school year it will be necessary to begin 
soon the investigations which must precede the formulating of 
plans for this new institution. 

Classes for Retarded Children. 

,/ 

The legislation regarding classes for children retarded in 
mental development provides that the School Committee shall 
before Jul}^ 1, 1920, and annually thereafter ^'ascertain under 
regulations prescribed by the Board of Education and the 
Director of the Commission on Mental Diseases the number 
of children three years or more retarded in mental development 
who are in attendance upon the public schools of its city or 
town or who are of school age and reside therein." It also pro- 
vides "At the beginning of the school year of nineteen hundred 
and twenty, the school committee of each citv and town in 
which there are ten or more children three years or more so 
retarded shall establish special classes to give such children 
instruction adapted to their mental attainments, under regula- 
tions prescribed by the board of education." 

It is apparent from these provisions that it will be neces- 
sary to make an investigation in accordance with the directions 
of the board of education to ascertain how many children 
there are in the city who need to be taught in these classes. 
Whether this will make necessary more classes than are now 
maintained can not be decided until the inquiry has been made. 

Americanization Work. 

Another act of the last legislature is one entitled "An 
Act to promote Americanization through the Education of 
Adult Persons unable to use the English Language." 

This provides that the Board of Education may co-operate 
with cities and towns to promote and provide for the educa- 
tion of persons over twenty-one years of age who are unable to 
s])eak, read, and write the English language. The school cojm 
mittee having already expressed its intention to accept the 
co-operation of the board of education in this matter this city 
will be entitled to receive from the Commonwealth one half 
the sums expended by it iu carrying out the provisions of this 
act. Several teachers are now employed in this work. There 
is no doubt that more classes should be formed ai^d more 
teachers employed to meet the conditions which exist in this 
citv. Tlie board of education through its agent will assist 
in investigating the needs of the community and in recommend- 
ing action that should be taken. It is the policy of tlie boar<l 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. lOi 

of education to conduct Americanization work of the State 
through local school committees. Such being the case, the 
initiative for meeting the needs of the community for this kind 
of work must be taken by the school committee. An enlarge*! 
program for this work is clearly needed and measures to pro- 
vide it should be adopted in the near future. 

Conclusion. 

I again invite your attention to the reports of the As- 
sistant Superintendent, the Head Master of the High School, 
the principal of the Vocational school for Boys, and the Gar- 
den Supervisor submitted herewith, and to the statistical tables 
and statements giving interesting facts and details about the 
work of the schools. 

In conclusion I express again my deep obligation to all 
the members of the School Committee for the courtesy and con- 
sideration which have attended all our personal relations. 1 
acknowledge also with pleasure the co-operation and support 
which have been given by the officers and teachers of the schools 
in all the work of the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles S. Clark, 

Superintendent of School-^. 
January 2, 1920. 



REPORT ON HIGH SCHOOL. 

Somerville, Mass., 

January 2, 1920. 
Mr. Charles S. Clark, 

Supt. of Schools, 

Somerville, Mass. 

Dear Mr. Clark : 

The unusual conditions of the past years have seriously in- 
terfered with the regular work of the school. This has been 
evident in various ways. Poor attendance has been the rule 
rather than the exception. Sickness, lack of interest, many op- 
portunities to do part time work out of school, and the general 
unrest have all tended to make pupils' attendance irregular. 
Add to these conditions the fact, that many days were lost 
because of coal shortage, influenza, etc., and it is very apparent 



102 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



that the number of school days per pupil has been of late years 
decidedly decreased. Furthermore, pupils when present have 
not been in the same mental attitude toward their work as for- 
merly. The uncertainty of the outcome of the war, the absence 
of members of their own families in the service, together with 
the death or sickness of relatives and friends have interfered 
with concentration of effort and with the accomplishing of 
satisfactory results. And in addition the constant appeal for 
pupils to assist, both in and out of school hours, in all kinds 
of war work reacted against the successful fulfilment of any 
definite educational program. The effect of all this has been 
hard to bear more particularly in the Preparatory department 
where the usual requirement for college entrance was strict- 
ly maintained by the colleges. Of course there have been some 
favorable reactions. Particularly has the interest in war work 
and the eager desire to be of service developed a high spirit 
of patriotism, of unselfishness and of loyalty. This effect, how- 
ever, was moral and spiritual, very rarely educational. 

This year, with the war closed, with no signs of unusual 
sickness and an accordingly greatly improved attendance, with 
the cessation of interruptions from demands for outside work, 
the school has been able to readjust itself to the accomplish- 
ment of the normal function of educating its pupils. The effect 
has been striking with the keynote "business" continuously 
before us. We have already, in a large way, recovered the 
old stride and have settled down to hard work with a gratify- 
ing energy. 

This has particularly shown itself in the preparatory de- 
partment which naturally suffered the most during the war. 
An unusual number of last June's graduating class felt the de- 
sire for a college education, and there were sent either by 
certificate or examination Sept., 1919, 95 pupils to the follow- 
ing institutions : 



Amherst College .... 
U. S. Naval Academy ... 
Boston University 

College of Business Administration 

College of Liberal Arts 

Law School 

Brown University . 

Columbia University 

Dartmouth College 

Harvard College 

Holy Cross College 

Jackson College 

Lowell Textile 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 



1 
1 

18 
4 
1 

1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
3 
4 
3 
1 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



103 



Northeastern College 
Notre Dame University 
Normal Schools 
Simmons College . 
Trinity College 
University of Pittsburg 
University of Maine 
Tufts College 

Total 



3 
1 

21 
5 
1 
1 
1 

18 

95 



In connection with these figures of 1919, I feel justified 
in making the statement that Somerville High School has a 
right to be proud of its record as a preparatory school, and I 
invite a careful inspection of tables following this letter as 
evidence. From Harvard this fall we have had two letters 
regarding our boys, showing that our graduates there are stand- 
ing well to the front. Two young men have been elected to the 
Phi Beta Kappa Society, three have received this fall scholar- 
ships of the first group and one of the second group. In ad- 
dition, one freshman this fall received Price Greenleaf Aid for 
excellence in passing his entrance examinations. 

I quote the following letter in full : 



Dear Mr. Averv 



Harvard College, 

Cambridge, Mass. 



I am glad to be able to tell you that Harold F. Price, '23, 
who entered Harvard this fall from your school, did such 
good work in the entrance examinations that we have been 
able to give him Price Greenleaf Aid. We shall hope that his 
future work ma}^ be so good that we can continue to aid him 
from our scholarship funds and in other waj^s. You may be 
sure that we shall endeavor in every possible way to help him 
and that we shall welcome any suggestions from you of ways 
in which conditions may be made more favorable for him. 

With congratulations on the good work of your school, 
which Price's record reflects, I am. 

Yours very truly, 

C. N. Greenough, 

Acting Dean, 



While great stress has been laid on our preparatory course, 
in no sense have the other courses been neglected. 

While statistics of the Commercial graduates are neces- 
sarily harder to obtain yet we are constantly in receipt of evi- 
dence that the graduates of our commercial department are 



104 AxNNUAL REPORTS. 

giving satisfaction in excellent positions. We could place 
many more young people in good positions. Requests are com- 
ing in continuously tor which we have no available candidates. 
A gratif^dng testimonial to the excellence of this department 
was a gift of three hundred dollars presented to the school 
last June in appreciation of the admirable record which our 
graduates have made in the business world. 

A business man employing many graduates of schools, in 
speaking of the exceptionally good work which one of our last 
year's graduates was doing tor him, said that he had never had 
a stenographer so adaptable and proficient. Reports of this 
kind are not uncommon. Dexterity in shorthand and knowl- 
edge of bookkeeping are of course essential in a commercial 
preparation, but too much emphasis cannot be laid, along with 
these, on general knowledge, proficiency in English, and all- 
roijnd adaptability. In these respects a public school can show 
results which the commercial school can seldom produce. There 
is no short road to success. A four year high school commer- 
cial training cannot fail to secure, if properly employed, high 
standards, great proficiency, and a high power of adaptability. 
Past results speak for themselves and our commercial gradu- 
ates deserve commendation. 

All things considered, therefore, I feel that the outlook for 
the Somerville High School is a bright one. 

With the complete organization of junior High Schools we 
should be able to concentrate on a three years' course of 
intensive work. Furthermore, the Junior High Schools under 
careful planning should in due time send us even better pre- 
pared pupils than we were formerly able to secure in the 
Sophomore jea^r. 

Also as a three year school we shall soon be reduced to 
numbers consistent with the size of, our building. In addi- 
tion to a release from crowding, we should thereby be able 
to secure rooms for activities sadly handicapped at present, — 
such rooms as a library of proper size and location, satisfactory 
teachers' rooms, improved toilets for pupils, special rooms for 
the school paper, athletics, and debating, an emergency room 
and office for our school matron, and a small assembly hall. 

Thanking you and the School Committee for your kind in- 
terest and co-operation, I am, 



Very sincerely yours, 

John A. Avery, 

Head Master. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 105 

REPORT ON JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS. 



Mr. Charles S. Clark, 

Superintendent of Schools, 
Somerville, Mass. 

Dear Sir: — 

The last school year was notable for the fact that junior 
high schools were for the first time in operation in all sections 
of the city, the fourth and last one, the Southern, having 
been opened in September, 1918, in the enlarged Bell building 
on Vinal Avenue. The transition from the regular grade or- 
ganization to the junior high school organization had been ac- 
complished by a plan of gradual extension, covering a period 
of three years. Each unit, as soon as organized, began opera- 
tion in a steady well-controlled, consistent manner, supported 
from the outset by earnest, enthusiastic teachers and pupils 
and by friendly, co-operative parents. 

Ideals and Purposes. 

As developed in Somerville, the junior high school plan 
has taken away no educational advantage from any pupil but 
has created a larger opportunity for securing in the school the 
maximum of preparation for the life that the child will later 
lead in the community. 

The school of today will not have done what may fairly 
be expected of it if it contents itself with imparting knowledge 
of a small range of subjects. It must prepare its pupils to 
become efficient members of the community. This most im- 
portant work of the school is not measurable by the writte?! 
examination : the real test comes after the child has passed 
into the activities of citizenship. 

SCHOOL LIFE, an official publication of the United 
States Bureau of Education, says : ^'There is plainly discernible 
a new spirit, a new method, and a new ideal in education. 

The new ideal of the school is the fitting of our 

youth to enter into reciprocal and co-operative relations wi" 
their fellow-men in an intelligent manner. The ideal in the 
past, at least in the city schools, has been the fitting of pupils 
to do the work of the next grade or to be promoted into tlie 
next higher school. The aim of the modern school is to develop 
initiative, good judgment, and right attitude toward ones' 
fellows. To develop initiative pupils must be given opportu- 
nity to initiate ; to cultivate good will requires active co-opera- 
tion with others ; to develop skill of any sort involves activity 
under proper guidance." 



106 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

A better statement of the ideals and aims of the junior 
high school would be hard to find. It is these ideals and 
aims that our schools are successfully emphasizing. 

One of the best known authorities on education in America 
asserts that the junior high school is the greatest contribution 
to American education in several generations. Somerville, 
therefore, has reason to be proud of the reputation for leader- 
ship its junior high schools have gained, extending far beyond 
local bounds. 

Centralization. 

One of the essential features of this type of school is the 
centralizing of pupils of the upper grades of several grammar 
schools into one school. The seventh and eighth grade chil- 
dren who under the former plan would have attended one of 
the fourteen grammar schools now go to one of the four 
junior high schools. Obviously this involves for some children 
the necessity of travelling an increased distance to school dur- 
ing those years. The increased distance during these two years 
is, however, offset, by the fact that inasmuch as the junior high 
school includes also the work of the first year of the high 
school, the number of years required to go the much greater 
distance to the senior high school is reduced by that one year. 
It should be remembered in this connection that the compact- 
ness of our city makes school distances small as compared with 
other communities. 

The advantages of centralization are so important that the 
gain to the pupil in the way of educational opportunity far 
outweighs any individual inconvenience. Parents and teachers 
recognize the fact that the child on coming to the age of twelve 
or thirteen years requires a form of discipline and control quite 
different from that needed in the earlier years. He is capable 
of carrying a larger responsibility than before and the control 
under which he develops most is one of direction rather than of 
dictation. So difficult is it to have these two forms of controv 
in the same school building that in the grammar school the 
latter form has usually prevailed. With the pupils of this age 
in a building by themselves and thus apart from the younger 
children, the former method of control can be employed. As 
good citizenship rests upon the knowledge of the difference be- 
tween right and wrong and a deliberate choice to do the right, 
it is that that has determined the choice of the method of direc- 
tion rather than of dictation as the method of our junior high 
schools. Visitors to these schools comment approvingly upon 
the evidences that the children are active, not passive; re- 
sponsible, not dependent. In other words, school is not alone 
preparation for life, it becomes life itself. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 107 

The teacher^ of the first two years of these schools have 
been chosen from those who had had successful experience in 
the corresponding years of the grammar schools. The assem- 
bling in one building of the larger number of pupils of the 
same grade makes it possible to reduce very materially the 
number of subjects any instructor is called upon to teach. 
This affords an opportunity for the teacher to choose the sub- 
jects in which she is most proficient and in which she may 
become a specialist, assuring to the children the best possible 
instruction in all subjects. 

Another economy effected by centralization is found in the 
avoidance of the necessity of duplication of the material aids 
to teaching, making possible a better use of the limited money 
available for the purchase of such material. This is particu- 
larly true in the field of manual training. 

There has been for many years an increasing recognition 
of the fact that the school cannot limit itself to book work 
alone and that more provision must be made for the training 
of the hand as well. Years ago this demand was recognized 
in Somerville by the establishment of three manual training 
centers to which the boys were sent from the surrounding 
schools. To reach these centers many boys had to go long 
distances, spending considerable time in passing to and from 
these shops. In many cases this loss of school time resulted 
in serious interference with the other work of the school. At 
these centers woodworking alone was taught. In each of the 
four junior high schools instruction is now provided in wood- 
working of a more practical sort than formerly. In addition, 
two schools offer instruction in metal working, a third in 
bookbinding, and the fourth in printing. While the object 
of this shop work is not to fit directly for the trade, yet it is 
of large value in giving an opportunity to test abilities and 
aptititdes along lines of work that are common to a large 
variety of hand occupations. Already these shops have opened 
fields of efficient work to many boys for whose individual needs 
and abilities book work alone made no adequate provision. It 
cannot be gainsaid that he who goes out of these schools into 
something that he can do well goes out to be a more respected 
and self-respecting citizen. To provide these opportunities for 
self -testing in every grammar school would involve prohibitive 
expense. 

For the girls sewing instruction was formerly provided in 
each school. Instruction in cooking, a most important aid in 
home-making, was admittedly impossible on account of the ex- 
pense. Every girl in the junior high school now has lessons 
in cooking. By a skilful harmonizing of the educational and 
the economic aspects of the work, the cooking centers are now 



108 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

entirely self-supporting, the sale of the product paying all 
maintenance costs except the salary of the teacher. 

Again, the bringing together in one school of the larger 
number of pupils of the same grade makes possible a better 
grouping in classes according to ability. The former grammar 
school with only one or two classes of the same grade worked 
oftentimes a hardship upon the quicker and the slower pupil 
alike. The former was held down to a pace that often in- 
vited a waste of time, while the latter, finding himself unable 
to maintain the required pace, often resorted to truancy and 
soon dropped out of school altogether. This is amply proved 
by the fact that in the sixth and seventh grades occurred the 
crest of the wave of truancy and habitual absenteeism. Al- 
ready the effect of the junior high school is being seen in its 
successful meeting of the needs of such pupils. Its privileges 
must be increasingly offered, to the over-aged, discouraged 
pupils for whom the work of the lower grades has lost its 
attractiveness and, therefore, largely its value, and must pro- 
vide a different type of instruction in a school made up of 
children of their own age-group. Just as life today demands 
workmen of a wide variety of occupations, so the school must 
constantly be broadening its field of instruction. This broad- 
ening does not mean at all the abandonment of adequate train 
ing in the fundamentals of knowledge ; it means that such es- 
sential training will be provided under even better and more 
attractive conditions, thus benefiting many for whom such in- 
struction alone has no adequate appeal. 

Co-operation of Home and School. 

A school can be most efficient only if it is supported by a 
live interest on the part of the three factors in its success, 
namely, parents, teachers, and pupils. From the outset, our 
junior high schools have been so supported. During the past 
year the Parent-Teachers' Associations connected with the 
Western and the Southern schools have been especially ac- 
tive and have held meetings frequently, attended in gratify- 
ingly large numbers by the teachers and parents of the chil- 
dren. Strong educational speakers have discussed subjects 
pertinent to the best development of junior high schools. These 
meetings have done much to bring about a good understand- 
ing between the school and the home. The most recently 
formed association, the one at the Northern, has made an ex- 
cellent beginning and is full of promise for good in that school. 

The interest on the part of the teachers has been apparent 
in many ways, particularly in larger professional interest in 
their work. Many have followed courses of study that they 
might be more efficient in their teaching. Educational meet- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 109 

ings have been largely attended whether in the late afternoon 
or on Saturday. 1 wish to take this opportunity to express 
my most cordial appreciation of the fine professional spirit 
and interest displayed by the teachers of the junior high 
schools. 

Evidences of Pupil-Interest. 

That the pupils are interested is evidenced constantly. 
There is a marked tendency to more regular attendance. It is 
a matter of frequent occurrence for boys to ask to be allowed 
to work in the shops in the afternoon. Perhaps the most con- 
vincing evidence of interest on the part of the pupils will be 
found in the following facts. Investigation covering the pe- 
riod from 1912 through 1917 shows that of those pupils pro- 
moted to the high school from the several grammar schools 
from eighteen to twenty-five per cent failed to enter the high 
school. At the end of the second year of the junior high school 
organization the pupil passes from grammar school to high 
school work, this being therefore the point in his school life 
corresponding to graduation from the grammar school. At 
this time a pupil for whom the work of high school character 
had no appeal would be most likely to drop out. A careful 
investigation has been made to locate every one who was last 
June promoted to ttie third year of the junior high school to 
begin high school work in September. One per cent could 
not be found ; four per cent went to work ; three per cent moved 
away but were known to be in high schools ; two per cent 
obtained transfer cards that would admit them to high schools 
elsewhere and presumably most of them are in high schools ; 
the remaining ninet}^ per cent entered the third year of our own 
junior high schools. It can therefore be asserted that one 
important expectation of the junior high school is already being 
realized in the longer retention of children in school, for this 
investigation shows that the loss to our schools at this point 
has been reduced one half. When the Forster Intermediate 
School was established in 1914 I predicted that this would 
be the result of a proper development of the new organization. 
At this time I wish to predict with the same confidence that the 
work done in the junior high schools will lead to a larger 
proportion of pupils entering and completing the course in the 
senior high school,. an accomplishment most earnestly to be de- 
sired. 

Interest is constantly being increased by the consistent 
effort on the part of the teachers in these schools to make the 
children consequential factors in the school. Responsibilities 
are given them increasingly, giving occasion for the initiative, 
co-operation, and activity referred to in the quotation from 



110 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

SCHOOL LIFE previously given. One of the best examples 
of this is the system of physical training in vogue in the junior 
high schools. Chosen leaders, two boys and two girls from each 
two rooms in each school, meet bi-weekly with the instruc- 
tors in physical training at the State Armory for instruction. 
The exercises in which they are there trained they afterward 
give to groups of pupils in daily periods in their own class- 
rooms. After a time the best trained groups from the four 
schools, selected by competition within the schools, compete at 
the Armory. The keenest competition results from the en- 
deavor to win but the good sportsmanlike manner in which 
the result is accepted by winners and losers alike, is excellent 
training for that attitude of mind that will in later life bring 
the most good out of success or disappointment. 

Courses of Study. 

It may fairly be said that organization problems of the 
junior high school have now been brought to the point where 
they do not demand as much attention as before. This leaves 
the way clear for greater focussing of interest upon the content 
of the courses of study in the several subjects. All energy may 
well be bent now to bring to all subjects of instruction the best 
content that co-operative thinking can give. 

Study In School and At Home. 

A problem that claims careful consideration is the matter 
of study, whether done in school or at home. It is beyond ques- 
tion that the school in the long class period now in vogue will 
go far in the way of training the pupils in right habits of study. 
The work of the school may be largely nullified, however, if the 
home on its part compels the child to study under conditions 
that are distracting. Parents may well be expected to see that 
the best possible conditions are created at home so that the 
pupil may get the most value out of the time he spends with 
his work there. Perhaps no question is a more vexing one 
than that of the amount and the nature of the work to be done 
at home. The best thought of both teachers and parents is 
invited with a view to reaching the right solution of the prob- 
lem. 

Recognition of Individual Differences. 

One of the most important developments in education in the 
past few years is the provision in the program of studies for 
recognition of the fact of individual differences in the abilities, 
interests, and aptitudes of children. The three principal 
groups of studies provided to meet these variations are: com- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. Ill 

mercial, leading to employment in business ; industrial, prepar- 
ing for a manual occupation of some sort ; and academic, look- 
ing toward professional life. The junior high school offers 
at the outset an opportunity for individual testing-out along 
all these general lines. The electives provided for this purpose 
are carefully explained to the pupils of the sixth grade, vso 
that the choices seem to be, in the main, well made. 

Four fifths of the time of the seventh and eighth grades is 
devoted to prescribed subjects. These are the standard studies 
of the grammar grades, as required by law or dictated by pub- 
lic demands. The remaining one fifth of the time is given to an 
elective, the pupil choosing one only of several studies repre- 
sentative of the three large groups named above. These are at 
present Latin, French, Spanish, principles of commercial work 
with t3'pewriting, and special manual or household arts. Any 
pupil not wishing to take any of these electives may intensify 
the work in the prescribed studies. The number over the entire 
city choosing to do the latter is so small as to indicate con- 
clusively that the patrons of the junior high schools approve 
and are glad to avail themselves of the opportunities afforded 
for the trying out of individual abilities by means of these 
electives. In order that varying needs may be met in still 
larger measure, it is desirable that these alternative opportu- 
nities should be increased in number. It should be apparent 
that while the electives serve the purpose of assisting the child 
to discover his bent, in every case the one so chosen re-enforces 
the instruction in some one or more of the prescribed studies. 
In the seventh grade provision is made for changing from 
one elective to another when by so doing it is evident that the 
pupiPs interests may be further advanced. This elective work 
constitutes so small a part of the whole work that his progress 
through the grades is not retarded by reason of such a change. 
These opportunities for self -discovery before reaching the years 
of the high school when the choice must of necessity be of more 
nearly final nature, is a large gain in the direction of effec- 
tive education and in itself justifies the organization of the 
junior high school. 

The Teacher Problem. 

The large number of changes of teachers the past year 
or two has somewhat broken up the continuity of the instruc- 
tion. The generous increase of salary recently provided by the 
School Committee with the co-operation of the Mayor and the 
Board of Aldermen, will without doubt result in stabilizing 
our corps of teachers and at the same time, when changes do 
occur, will make it possible for our schools to attract the best 
from manv other communities. 



112 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Leaving School. 

If parents would confer with the teachers when a pupil be- 
gins to think of dropping out of school, the combined interest 
and efforts of parents and teachers would doubtless result in a 
decision to continue in school. Considering the importance 
of the issue and the anxiety of the school to serve best the 
interests of all the children, this does not seem too much to ask. 

Rapid Spread of the Junior High School. 

Your annual report of 1915 to the School Committee, re- 
ferring to the beginning of the junior high school work in Som- 
erville, contains this statement, amounting to a prophecy; "It 
is pioneer work in a movement bound to continue." 

It is therefore pertinent at this time to inquire as to the 
present situation in the light of this assertion. 

In 1916 the system was adopted to cover the entire city. 
In that year the epidemic of infantile paralysis compelled the 
closing of the schools for over a month. The next school year 
the coal shortage caused a month's interruption of the work. 
The third year, beginning in September of 1918, was handi- 
capped by the enforced closing for a month by reason of the 
epidemic of influenza. In addition three of the schools are 
now very seriously handicapped by lack of room. Certainly 
circumstances have been far from favorable for the successful 
<?arrying out of so important a departure from the established 
regime. It is therefore all the more striking confirmation of 
the wisdom of the adoption of the new system that the schools 
have met with the cordial approval of our own citizens and in 
addition have attracted favorable comment from far and near. 

Three years ago in connection with a convention in Bos- 
ton, a conference was held to consider junior high school prob- 
lems. The subject at that time attracted only eleven men. A 
few weeks ago a similar meeting was held in Boston, which 
was attended by eighty. As an outcome of the vote of that 
meeting the State Board of Education is arranging a three 
days' conference of junior high school administrators to be 
held at one of the State Normal Schools next spring. One of 
the largest universities gave leave of absence for six months 
to one of its professors to investigate for the United States 
Bureau of Education the junior high schools of the country. 
His report shows our Somerville schools up in a most favora- 
ble light. 

The growing importance of the junior high school is 
shown by the recognition given it by the several colleges and 
other schools that train teachers. For example. Harvard, Bos- 
ton University, Tufts, Dartmouth, Columbia, and all the nor- 
mal schools of Massachusetts offer courses specifically prepar- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 113 

ing teachers for work in junior high schools. 

Last spring the Superintendent and the School Commit- 
tee of one of the largest cities of our state visited our schools 
and shortly afterward adopted the system for their city. Vis- 
iting school officials have given us most gratifying endorse- 
ment that cannot fail to stimulate us to still greater effort. 
Letters of inquiry are constantly coming to us, a single day 
recently having brought such letters from three widely sep- 
arated States. The system has now been officially approved 
for the entire State of New York and for three or four other 
states, which shows that we are moving in the approved direc- 
tion of educational development. 

A letter from one of the high schools in the city of New 
York, under date of Nov. 10, 1919, says : "It seems to me that 
the city of Somerville has worked out a solution of the Jun- 
ior High School problem which is eminently satisfactory and 
which might well serve as a model for other cities. I only 
hope that the city of New York may find a means of meeting 
its own needs in as satisfactory a manner." 

The Future. 

Gratifjdng as these endorsements are, it is farthest from 
our thought to rest contented with present accomplishments. 
In order that even better results may be accomplished in these 
schools, we most cordially welcome constructive suggestion and 
invite the continued earnest co-operation of all who are in- 
terested to assist us in realizing the purpose for which these 
schools were established, namely, the providing of a better 
preparation for useful living. 

Verv trulv yours, 

Joseph A. Ewart, 
Assistant Superintendent of SchooU. 
January, 1920. 

REPORT OF VOCATIONAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 

Mr. Charles S. Clark, 
Supt. of Schools, 

Somerville, Mass. 

Dear Sir: 

I submit the following report for the Boys' Vocational 
School and for the Department of Manual Arts for the year 
1919. 

The drawing of the sixth grades of the elementary schools 
continues as in the past with the teaching done by the room 



IIJ: ANNUAL REPORTS. 

teachers under direct supervision. Although considerable work 
has been completed for the Red Cross and occasional demands 
in the future will be met by this department of drawing, in 
the main, the schools are now adjusting themselves to follow 
the outline of the work of the regular schedule. 

The whittling of the sixth grade boys has been intensified 
by combining with drawing the former sixth and seventh 
grade projects, thereby increasing to a moderate extent the 
boys' ability to handle the more difficult work. At the same time 
this combination of drawing and whittling projects approaches 
more nearly the work of the junior high grade. The sixth grade 
teachers have recently finished a ten weeks' course in black- 
board sketching which was planned to equip them for better 
presentation of the grade whittling and free hand drawing. 
Much of the original work in knife work has made its appear- 
ance in some schools. 

The four junior high schools are now running smoothly 
with fairly well equipped shops. With the installation of ma- 
chines the equipment will be complete. However, the shops 
\vill be inadequate to accommodate the increasing number of 
pupils. Already over time work is being done in the after- 
noons. Therefore, I recommend an additional room in each 
centre in the near future. 

The free hand drawing is now in charge of a special teach- 
er in each school, but in order to enable the work to be carrie<i 
on efficiently as in the senior high school, a special room with 
adequate equipment is urgently needed. 

The drawing and manual training in the senior high school 
remains unchanged. Although in a large way the first year 
woodwork is now done in the junior high schools, there re- 
mains a considerable group of boys taking first year shop work. 
These boys come from the parochial schools, from out of the 
city, and from the upper classes, pupils electing woodwork 
and drawing for the first time. These mixed groups are diffi- 
cult to handle, but considering the wide range of the pupils' 
ability, these classes are conducted in as capable a way as pos- 
sible. The rooms and equipment seem to be adequate for some 
time to come. 

The enrollment of the Boys' Vocational School is the larg- 
est in its history. The addition of the automobile department 
meets completely the predicted need« of this branch of in- 
dustry. Considerable equipment has been furnished in this 
department during the year but further equipment is needed 
to carry on the necessary work of construction. Additional 
equipment is greatly needed in the machine department and 
requests for machines have been made to the War Depart- 
ment and the Federal Board of Vocational Education. At this 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



115 



date the prospect of receiving assistance from these agencie^s 
looks promising. To meet the new conditions arising from 
the establishment of the junior high schools which has in- 
creased the number of sixth grade applicants, I strongly rec- 
ommend that the boys be required to remain in school four 
years before graduating. It is very evident that these boys, 
in many cases, of a demoted group, are unable in three years 
to satisfactorily complete the necessary work to enable them to 
acceptably fill positions in the industry for which they trained^ 
Our three year course now in operation allows little enough 
time to meet present industrial requirements, even with a nor- 
mal boy of regular promotion grade. To make our school 
still more efficient, I recommend that a department of printing 
be added this year as conditions in the trade warrant the 
introduction of this course. This will also give an opportunity 
for boys now taking printing in the junior high schools to 
continue the work as a means of livelihood. 

The following are statistics relative to the school: 



Year 

1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 





Placed 




Total 


No. of 


in 


Average 


Produc- 


Grad- 


Indus- 


Entering 


tivity 


uates 


try- 


Wage 


of Shops 


16 


is 


$11 00 


$1,105 14 


18 


17 


12 00 


3,215 33 


15 


15 


14 50 


5,345 98 


9 


8 


15 00 


4,928 88 



December 31, 1919. 



Respectfully yours, 

Harry L. Jones. 



REPORT OF GARDEN SUPERVISOR FOR 1919. 



Mr. Charles S. Clark, 

Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my report as agricultural teacher and 
garden supervisor for the season of 1919. 

The line of work carried on by myself during the past 
season embraced the following activities: conducting and su- 
pervising of school gardens, instruction and advice to back 
yard gardeners, the organizing and conducting of canning 
clubs, the forming and carrying on of poultry clubs, and co- 



110 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

operating with the Middlesex Country Farm Bureau in all 
of their torms of agricultural activities, including the forming 
of Home Economics Clubs in the junior high schools. 

Gardening. 

School gardens were carried on by seventeen different 
schools in the city on areas of land belonging to the city and 
donated by private individuals for this purpose. The total 
acreage was about nine and a half acres. The children in the 
different schools were organized into garden clubs with a presi- 
dent, secretary, and treasurer. Meetings were held during 
February and March at which instructions were given regard- 
ing the work and the methods to be pursued in the carrying on 
of their gardens during the gardening season. Three hundred 
seventy four children were organized into seventeen differ 
ent clubs ; these clubs were held intact during the entire season 
and in the fall exhibits and reports were made by the children 
individually and as clubs. In connection with this work an 
attempt was made to correlate garden activities with arith- 
metic, spelling, and bookkeeping by placing a school garden 
record book in the hands of each child and making one of tlie 
requirements the keeping of accurate records in this book. 
About twenty-two hundred fifty children signed cards and 
were enrolled as members of the United States School Garden 
Army and carried on some form of gardening either in their 
own back yards or neighboring vacant lots. Advice and in- 
struction were given to these children by the garden supervisor 
w^henever requests were made. 

Perhaps some idea of the results obtained from the gar- 
den work may be gained by a study of the garden record books. 
The value of the products raised and either sold or used in 
the home amounted to |7,779.95. All but eleven of the three 
hundred seventy-four gardens were properly cared for and suc- 
cessfully carried on to the end of the season. The appearance 
of the gardens at all times was a credit to the children and 
those responsible for this line of work. 

First prize was awarded the children for their exhibit of 
garden products at the New England States Fair ^t Worces- 
ter early in September. The officers and directors of the 
Middlesex County Farm Bureau paid this city several visits 
during the season and brought with them instructors and peo- 
ple interested in garden work who were much pleased with the 
results obtained and the methods pursued. 

Canning Clubs. 

Canning clubs were conducted in connection with garden 
work. Most of the eighty members of six canning clubs had 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 117 

a school garden so that a large part of the vegetables canned 
were picked fresh and this in a large degree was responsible 
for the excellent results obtained. Canning operations were 
carried on in the cooking room of the high school and the 
western junior high school. Two young ladies were employed 
three days a week to supervise and help the children. A total 
of about sixteen hundred quart jars was canned, and at the 
exhibit held this fall banners were awarded to four of the 
clubs which signified that every member of that club had com- 
pleted all requirements of the state department of agriculture 
and exhibited products worthy of a rating of ninety per cent. 
or better. 

PoL'ltry Clubs. 

A new kind of activity in the form of poultry clubs was 
attempted this fall. The state department of agriculture sent 
out bulletins stating that they were to carry on junior egg- 
laying poultry clubs for one year beginning November first. 
Any child between the ages of ten and fifteen who owned or 
cared for five or more hens would be considered eligible for 
enrollment in a poultry club. This statement was placed in 
the hands of school principals in the elementary schools of the 
city and more than four hundred children applied for member- 
ship in a poultry club. It was necessary to make rather strict 
rules and by a process of elimination five poultry clubs were 
actually formed with a membership of sixty-five children. They 
have agreed to carry on this work for a year's time, keeping 
accurate account of all expenses entailed and number of eggs 
laid, money received for same, etc. At the end of the year 
we hope to have some interesting and instructive data on this 
subject. These children meet once a month, have elected their 
own officers and the garden supervisor meets with them and 
plans to have some interesting speaker from the department 
of agriculture attend their meetings occasionally and talk to 
the children along poultry lines. 

Home Economics Clubs have been formed in the Southern 
and Northern junior high schools. These clubs are carried 
on with work outlined by the state, which provides a super- 
visor who comes to Somervjlle and attends their club meetings 
and helps the children with their work. 

Two public exhibits were held this fall, one at the Cutler 
school and the other at the Southern Junior High School. 
Both of these exhibits were well attended by the public as well 
as the school children. The quality and quantity produced and 
canned material exhibited at both exhibitions were highly 
creditable to those participating. The judges, who were fur- 
nished by the state, were much surprised and pleased that a 



118 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

city with so little chance for gardening work should make such 
a good showing. 

During the season pictures were taken of the children at 
work in their gardens and from these pictures lantern slides 
have been made and were shown for the first time at both 
exhibits. 

In closing, permit me to express my appreciation to all 
those interested in this branch of school work. If it had not 
been for the hearty co-operation of principals and teachers as 
well as the children themselves, the results obtained would not 
have been possible. 

Very truly yours, 

William B. Moore, 

Garden Supervisor, 



REPORT OF PUPILS ENTERING HARVARD UNIVERSITY FROM 
SOMERVILE HIGH SCHOOL 

1912-1919. 

Entered Sept., 1913. 

No. 1, Graduated 1916, cum laudel, received 4 scholarships. 

No. 2, Graduated 1916, cum laude, received 3 scholarships. 

No. 3, Graduated 1916, cum laude. 

No. 4, Left to join Co. B, 301st Infantry, 2nd. Lt. 

No. 5, Graduated 1916. 

Entered Sept., 1913, 

No. 1, Graduated 1917, received 1 scholarship. 

No. 2, Graduated 1917, cum laude, received 2 scholarships. 
No. 3, Graduated 1916, cum laude, received 2 scholarships. 
No. 4, Graduated 1917, cum laude, received 1 scholarship. 
No. 5, Graduated 1916, received 1 scholarship. 

No. 6, Graduated 1917. 

Entered Sept., 1914, 

No. 1, Graduated 1918, cum laude, received 3 scholarships. 
No. 2, Graduated 1918, entered Naval Reserve May, 1918. 
No. 3, Graduated 1919, (war degree) entered Government ser- 
vice Mar., 1918. 
No. 4, Graduated 1918, received 1 scholarship. 

No. 5, Graduated 1918, received 1 scholarship. 

No. 6, Graduated 1918, cum laude. 
No. 7, Graduated 1918. 
No. 8, Graduated 1918, (war degree) . 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 119 



Entered Sept. y 1915. 



No. 1, Graduated 1918, (war degree), received 3 scholarships, 

Naval Ensign. 
No. 2, Graduated 1918, (war degree), 2nd. Lt. 
No. 3, Graduated 1918, (war degree) . 

Entered Sept., 1916. 

No. 1, Withdrew Feb., 1919, ill health. 

No. 2, Withdrew Sept., 1917, ill health, received 1 scholarship. 

No. 3, Still in college, received 4 scholarships, elected Phi 

Beta Kappa, Jan., '19. 
No. 4, Still in college, received 4 scholarships, elected Phi 

Beta Kappa, Jan., '19. 
No. 5, Still in college, received 1 scholarship. 
No. 6, Still in college. 

Entered Sept,, 1917. 

No. 1, Left at end of first year. 
No. 2, Left at end of first year. 
No. 3, Still in college. 
No. 4, Left at end of first year. 

Entered Sept., 1918. 

No. 1 , Still in college. 

No. 2, Still in college, received 1 scholarship. 

Entered Sept., 1919. 

No. 1, Still in college, received 1 scholarship. 
No. 2, Still in college. 

Summary of Eight Years' Record. 

1. Number entered, 36. 

2. Number graduated, 21. 

3. Number graduated, cum laude, 8. 

4. Number receiving scholarships, 17. 

5. Number scholarships received, 34. 

6. Number elected to Phi Beta Kappa, 2. 

7. Number still in college, 9. 

8. Number withdrawn, ill health, 2. 



120 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



PUPILS LEAVING HIGH SCHOOL SEPT., 1918, TO MAR. 12, 1919. 

I Yr. 

To go to work 17 

Moved out of town 10 

Poor Work ;.... 4 

Truancy 3 

No reason given 28 

Poor deportment 2 

Financial reasons 1 

111 health 

Married 

Died 



II Yr. 


III Yr. 


IV Yr. 


Total 


17 


4 





38 


10 


6 


5 


31 


3 


1 





8 











*> 


18 


14 


5 


65 





1 





3 


2 








3 


3 


2 


2 


7 





1 





t 





3 


2 


5 



SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL. 

Distribution of Pupils by Courses 
1918-1919. 





Preparatory 


Commercial 


General 


Total 


Class of 1919 


146 44.9% 


125 38.4% 


54 16.7% 


325 


" 1920 


144 48.7 


119 40.2 


33 11.1 


296 


" " 1921 


209 40.9 


256 50.0 


47 8.1 


512 


" 1922 


251 41.1 


336 55.0 


24 3.9 


611 


School 


750 43% 


836 47.9% 


158 9.1% 


1744 



NUMBER OF PUPILS BY SUBJECTS, 
1919-1920. 



English 1691 

History 813 

Latin 420 

French *851 

German 28 

Spanish 300 

Greek 18 

Mathematics 763 

Chemisltry 270 

Physics 81 

Physiology 203 

Biology 60 

Astronomy and Geology 11 

Elocution 278 

Stenography i 653 

Typewriting 670 

Bookkeeping 318 

Penmanship 744 

Business Arithmetic 37 

Salesmanship 48 

Commerce and Industry 531 

Commercial Law 19 

Manual Training 192 

Mechanical Drawing 298 

Freehand Drawing 125 

Cooking 61 

Sewing 107 

Arts and Crafts 16 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



121 



HONOR PUPILS. 
By Years and Quarters. 





1918-1919. 








Quarters 
IV Yr. Class . 
Honor pupils . 
Per Cent 


. I 
330 

28 

8.5 


11 
321 
44 
13.7 


III 

304 

39 

12.8 


IV 
301 
35 
11.6 


IIIYr. Class . 
Honor Pupils . 
Per Cent 


295 
15 
5.8 


288 
25 
8.7 


277 
31 
11.2 


260 
30 
11.5 


II Yr. Class . 
Honor Pupils . 
Per Cent 


'510 
29 
5.7 


496 
42 

8.3 


480 
44 
9.2 


452 
43 
9.5 


1 Yr. Class 
Honor Pupils . 
Per Cent 


608 
53 
8.7 

1917-1918. 


594 
57 
9.6 


582 
67 
11.5 


561 
68 
12.1 


Quarters 
IV Yr. Class . 
No. Credit 
Per Cent 


I 
287 
30 
14.5 


II 
281 
39 
13.9 


III 
306 
54 
17.6 


IV 
300 
58 
19.3 


III Yr. Class . 
No. Credit 
Per Cent 


364 

29 

8 


344 
41 
11.9 


361 
46 
12.7 


339 
34 
10 


II Yr. Class . 
No. Credit 
Per Cent 


555 
38 
6.8 


531 
7^ 
13.7 


405 
48 
11.9 


374 
59 
15.6 


1 Yr. Class 
No. Credit 
Per Cent 


218 
21 
9.6 

1916-1917. 


210 
23 
10.5 


207 
24 
11.6 


185 
52 
28.9 


Quarters 
IV Yr. Class . 
No. Credit 
Per Cent 


I 
322 


II 
316 
46 
14.6 


III 
339 
45 
13.3 


IV 

328 

13 

4 


III Yr. Class . 
No. Credit 
Per Cent 


398 


387 
43 
11.1 


388 
33 
8.5 


368 
46 
12.5 


II Yr. Class . 
No. Credit 
Per Cent 


518 


507 
67 
13.2 


538 
69 
12.8 


493 
69 
14 


1 Yr. Class 
No. Credit 
Per Cent 


537 


520 
55 
10.6 


423 
51 
12.1 


389 
86 
22.1 



122 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Quarters 
IV Yr. Class 
No. Credit 
Per Cent 

III Yr. Class 

No. Credit 
Per Cent 

II Yr. Class 
No. Credit 
Per Cent 

I Yr. Class 

No. Credit 
Per cent 



1915-1916. 








I 


II 


III 


IV 


351 


351 


363 


358 


35 


41 


44 


17 


14.5 


11.7 


12.1 


4.8 


384 


379 


395 


381 


46 


54 


46 


58 


12 


14.2 


11.6 


15.2 


522 


515 


543 


515 


48 


70 


60 


61 


9.2 


13.6 


11 


11.8 


721 


711 


754 


730 


58 


85 


90 


82 


8 


12 


11.9 


11.2 



REPORT OF PUPILS ENTERING HIGHER INSTITUTIONS FROM 

SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 

BETWEEN THE YEARS 1912 AND 1919. 



Gradu- No. of Elected 

ated *Rec'd Scholar- to Still 

Number Gradu- with Scholar- ships Phi Beta in 
Entered ated Honor ships Received Kappa College 



Boston University 


27 


10 


2 


2 


2 


2 


11 


Harvard 


. 36 


21 


8 


17 


34 


2 


9 


Jackson 


43 


9 


8 


• •>• 


• «•• 


• ••• 


24 


Mt. Holyoke . 


8 


3 


.... 


1 


• •■• 


• ••• 


1 


Radcliffe 


27 


15 


1 


9 


14 


• •••' 


8 


Simmons 


. 31 


17 


.... 


.... 


• ••• 


.... 


12 


Smith . 


7 


3 


2 


.... 


• ••• 


1 


3 


State Normal 
















Schools . 


99 


62 


.... 




• ••• 


.... 


24 


Tufts . 


97 


23 


3 




• ••• 


.... 


46 


Wellesley 


. 15 


7 


.... 


3 


4 


.... 


2 


Wheaton 


6 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


6 



Total 



396 



170 



24 



^32 



54 



146 



This report does not include Dartmouth, Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, and others, from which no report has as yet been received. 

* These scholarships indicate superior achievement. No mention is made 
of scholarships received in institutions Where the financial need of the 
student rather than excellence of rank is the basis of award. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 123 

SOMERVILLE TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION. 
1919. 



President, Charles A. Kirkpatrick. 

Vice-Presidents ^ Irving P. Colman. 

Vice Presidents, ^ ^^^^^ g. Thistle. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Anna J. Coll. 
Executive Committee : — 

Charles S. Clark, ex-officio. 



Annie C. Woodward, High. 
Edith L. Lraycock, E. Junior. 
Katherine E. Read, S. Junior. 
May A. Daly, N. Junior. 
Ralph E. Farnsworth, W. Junior. 
Harry L. Jones, Boys' Vocational. 
Lucy Dorr, Girls' Vocational. 
Jeannette M. Hannabell, Prescott. 
Maude A. Nichols, Hanscom. 
M. Regina Desmond, Bennett. 
Etta R. Holden, Baxter. 
Eleanor M. Lundgren, Knapp. 
Mary A. Mullin, Perry. 
Mrs. Stella M. Hadley, Cummings. 
C. Edith Taylor, Pope. 



Mary E. Richardson, Edgerly. 
Alice C. Blodgett, Glines. 
Grace Shorey, Forster. 
Ethel Gross, Bingham. 
Hazel N. Friend, Carr. 
Mary A. Whitney, Morse. 
Abigail P. Hazelton, Durell. 
Ruth E. Andrews, Burns. 
Lucia Alger, Proctor. 
Annie Sanburn, Brown. 
Marion Allen, Highland. 
Clara G. Hegan, Lowe. 
Mrs. Mabel T. Totman, Cutler. 
Eliza H. Lunt, Lincoln. 



The meetings held under the auspices of this association 
in the year 1919 were as follows : — 

January 29 — Peace Social and Sing — Conducted by Mr. Frank W. 
Seabury, Master, Highland School. 



February 5 — Address by Rev. William Harman Van Allen 
"Liberty, Bolshevik or American?" 



February 19 — 'Social and Sing 
Supervisor of Music. 

February 26 — Address by Captain H. D. Cormerais 
Exploits of the 26th Division, A. E. F." 



Subject: 
Conducted by Mr. James P. McVey, 

Subject: "The 
Subject: 



April 8 — Illustrated lecture by Dr. Donald B. MacMillan 
"Four Years in the Great White North." 

October 23 — Address by Mr. Frank W. Wright, Deputy Commissioner 
of the State Board of Education. Subject: "Teachers of the 
Times." 



124 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

SOMERVILLE TEACHERS' CLUB. 
Officers, 1919-1920. 

President, Annie C. Woodward. 

Vice-Presidents, \ ^^""^ ^' Bryant. 

' X Clara G. Hegan. 

Recording Secretary, Clara B. Sackett. 
Corresponding Secretary, Gladys L. Swallow. 
Treasurer, Elizabeth J. Mooney. 
Auditor, Mary F. Osborne. 

Object. 

The object shall be to secure a close union among the wo- 
men teachers in Somerville; to promote the spirit of mutual 
helpfulness; to advance professional interests; to create a 
deeper sense of the dignity of the profession; to unite the in- 
terests of the home and school. 

Program. 

January 14 — First of a series of musicals by the Philharmonic Trio; 
Frank McDonald, Violin; Louis Dalbeck, 'Cello; Fred Tillotsen, 
Piano. 

February 11 — Piano Recital by James Ecker, assisted by Helen Choate, 
Soprano. 

March 11 — Reception to Superintendent and Mrs. Clark and His 
Honor, the Mayor, and Mrs. Eldridge, followed by a Concert by 
the Ladies' Philharmonic Orchestra, assisted by Hazel Clark, 
Violin soloist, and Helen Choate, Soprano. 

April 1 — Address by Isabella MacLean — "The Immigrant Woman." 
Miss Joslin of the Department of University Extension of the 
Board of Education spoke on "The Work the Department is 
Willing to do for Teachers." 

October 14 — Musicale. Soprano, Margaret Miller Henry; Violinist, 
Lucy Dennett; Pianist, Nina del Castillo. 

November 18 — Lecture Recital on the "Attributes of Music as an 
Art," presented by Elbridge W. Newton, of Somerville, illustrat- 
ed on the piano by Helen Leavitt. 

Mary McSkimmon, President of the Massachusetts Teachers' 
Federation, addressed the club on "The Future Plans of this Fed- 
eration." High School orchestra furnished the music for danc- 
ing. 

December 17 — Christmas Party, Solos, fancy dancing, carol singing, 
and a Christmas Tree, followed by refreshments and dancing. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



125 



HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 
Report of Treasurer, Janu<ary 1, 1920. 



Receipts: 

Balance on hand January 1, 1919 
Baseball games 
Football games 
Membership 



NOTE: 



Amount due Mr. O'Donnell for coaching 
Leaving a balance, after bill is paid, . 



$657 10 
517 75 

8,581 66 
218 75 



Disbursements : — 




Supplies ...... 


$1,987 15 


Coaching ...... 


950 00 


Telephone ...... 


10 75 


Manager's expenses. Student . 


3 45 


Travelling expenses .... 


79 00 


Guarantees to Teams .... 


2,981 19 


Postage ....... 


2 40 


Miscellaneous 


11 18 


Dues, Suburban League and Mass. High 




School League 


7 00 


Printing ....... 


191 00 


Medical attendance and supplies, 1918-19 


249 00 


Treasurer's salary 1918-19 


400 00 


Music, Band for Everett-Somerville game 


84 00 


Police 


310 00 


Officials . . . . . . 


231 00 


Advertising . . 


28 19 


Car fare, Hotel, Meals, etc., for six per- 




sons to Toledo, Ohio, and return . 


473 83 


Balance in Bank January 1, 1920 


1,976 12 



1,975 26 



1,975 26 



$1,150 00 
$826 12 



Respectfully submitted, 

J. L. Hayward, 

8 e&y •Treasurer 



126 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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STATEMENT OF WORK OF SCHOOL NURSES. 
For Year Ending June 30, 1919. 





School 

or 
Hospital 







■g 






PTTPILS KSCORTED TO CLINICS 


.1 

p 

O 


1 

1 
c 


■c 

8 


Oper- 


Conta- 
gion 


Home 


Hy- 
giene 






;no. of 

Pupils 


-J: 


Eye 


Ear 


Nose 

and 

Throat 


♦Medi- 
cal 


Surgical 


Skin 


Dental 


ations 


found in* 


\ isits 




R E M A K K S 




i 


Inspections 
for 




o 


c 
o 


P 
o 
K 

2 
2 
1 
5 

14 
3 
2 

11 
2 
2 

44 


> 

"A 

28 
7 
46 
42 
49 
36 
40 
18 
35 
15 

316 


5 
11 

6 
41 
18 
33 
28 
48 
37 
57 
36 

315 


o 
o 
x; 

Oi 

146 
120 
991 
309 
140 
211 

1243 
522 

1078 
330 

5090 


s 

o 

w 

3 

2 
1 

6 




DATE 


s 

g 


O 




c 


'A 


5 


"A 


■a 
O 


% 


5 


'A 


5 


'A 


C 


'A 


5 


"A 


5 


September : Visiting nurse sent a needy woman, and bed linen secured. Children'.s shoos secured from Associated Charities. Careful investigation^ made to 
ascertain the cause of the unusually large number of absentees, and a full report made to the Board of Health and Superintendent of Schools 

October: Schools closed until the 21st. Many children returning were excluded because of influenza in the home. Child taken to Psvcopathic Hospital for 
examination and found to be mongolian, idiot type. Dental inspections made and a number of children sent to School Dispensary " 




75 

22 

15 

8 

6 

11 

21 

15 

25 

5 




Schools 57 
Hospitals 1 
Schools 30 
Hospitals 1 
Schools 131 
Hospitals 6 
Schools 85 
Hospitals 5 
Schools 93 
Hospitals 5 
Schools 120 
Hospitals 9 
Schools 147 
Hospitals 9 
Schools 91 
Hospitals 11 
Schools 154 
Hospitals 15 
Schools 103 
Hospitals 13 


253 

288 
2074 

855 
1587 
1824 
1407 

619 
1233 

637 


27 
13 
179 
118 
89 
368 
596 
240 
499 
281 


66 
45 
377 
162 
201 
239 
217 
145 
335 
223 


70 

15 
143 
121 

74 
238 
219 

97 
141 

62 


■ 58 


November : Assisted the Medical Inspectors. Dental inspections made and children sent to School Dispensary and Forsyth Dental Infirmary Reported con- 


September 














1 




1 
1 






















ditions in three homes to S.P.C.C. and others to the Associated Charities. Thanksgiving dinners secured for several worthv families. ' 
December: Assisted the Medical Inspectors. Reported cases of influenza to Board of Health. Engaged hospital treatment for several children. Dental in- 


October 


262 
63 
30 
62 

104 
41 
84 
31 


2 
1 
2 

1 
4 
1 
3 


3 
2 
6 
2 
3 
6 





1 


1 
1 










2 
6 
10 


1 
1 


4 
2 
2 
5 
5 
7 
5 

30 


1 

1 

3 
6 
4 
4 
5 
2 

26 








spections made and several children sent to Forsyth Dental Infirmary. Child taken to Psvcopathic Hospital for examination and found to have epilepsy. 
Child taken to Boston Dispensary and cataract treated. Neglected children found and reported. Clothing secured for needy children. Several Christmas 




1 


1 


.... 














dinners secured for worthy families. 
January : Assisted Medical Inspectors. Arranged for operations for two children. Secured clothing for several needy children. Child taken to Psvcopathic 


January 

February 


1 
2 






1 


1 
4 
2 

2 












Hospital for examination, and recommended for admission to Waverly School for Feeble Minded. Child with injured knee taken to Boston Dispensary. 
X-Ray taken and treatment given. Dental inspections made. 








1 
2 
1 














February : Assisted Medical Inspectors. Dental inspections made and children sent to School Dispensary. Found a case of diphtheria. Found a case of de- 
fective vision. Arranged with Somerville Hospital to take an X-Ray of an injured elbow. Arranged for hospital treatment for nine children. Secured 




4 
8 
5 

8 


3 
3 

7 


1 

2 
3 


1 

2 






7 

17 
25 
12 

79 


2 
5 
43 
35 

87 


2 
2 


3 
1 

8 
14 

26 


3 
1 

8 
14 

26 


free vaccination for several poor children. 
March : Dental examinations made and children sent to School Dispensary. Talks on personal hygiene to groups in the schools. Child taken to the Boston 


April 

May 






1 




Dispensary and impressions taken for a brace, to be paid for by a charitable society. Gave clothing to needy children. One case reported to s.P.c.C. Ar- 
ranged for hospital treatment for three children. Arranged for several hospital operations. Reported suspicious T. B. home to Board of Health. 






April: Completed arrangements with Forsyth Dental Infirmary to receive six children for treatment, twice a week. Dental inspections made and children 
sent to School Dispensary. Arranged for four operations at Children's Hospital. Arranged for seven operations at Boston Dispensary. Cases of neglected 


June 












children reported. 
May: Dental inspections made. Several needy families reported to charitable societies. Reported several cases of neglect to S.P.C.C. Clothing and shoes 


















1 


— 


supplied several children. Arranged for five operations at the Boston Dispensary, and hospital treatment for several others. 
June: Assisted Medical Inspectors. Treated and dressed septic foot. Treated child overcome bv heat. Gave clothing to several needy families. Dental in- 


Total 


Schools 1011 
Hospitals 75 


10777 


1910 


2010 


1180 


735 


14 


22 


3 


1 


27 


14 


6 


6 


6 


9 


203 


spections made and pupils sent to School Dispensary. Arranged for an operation at Forsyth Dental Infirmary and hospital treatment for several children. 



♦Treated by family physician or dentist. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 127 



IN MEMORY OF CARA M. JOHNSON, 

a teacher in the Highland School, 

WHO DIED DECEMBER 21, 1919. 

After a faithful service of twenty-two' years in the public schools of 
Somerville. 



128 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

CONTENTS OF APPENDIX. 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 

Population and school census. 

School buildings. 

Teachers. 

Attendance for year. 

Cost of school maintenance. 

Teachers' salaries. 

Results of eye and ear tests. 

MISCE1.LANE0US TABLES. 
CONCERNING FINANCE. 

No. of Table. 

1. Schedule of school property. 

2. Cost of maintaining schools, school year 1918-1919. 

3. Cost per capita of maintaining schools, school year 1918-1919. 

4. Cost of maintaining schools for a series of years. 

5. Cost per capita for maintaining schools for a series of years. 

6. Amount spent annually for new school buildings and for re- 

pairs for a series of years. 

CONCERNING PUPILS. 

7. Population and school registration. 

8. Attendance, etc., of the schools for school year 1918-1919. 

9. Statistics of the high school for school year 1918-1919. 

10. Pupils by grades, June, 1919. 

11. Separate statistics for high, junior high, elementary and voca- 

tional schools, for school year 1918-1919. 

12. Admissions to first grade in February and (September. 

13. Number of junior high school graduates, 1919. 

14. Truant statistics for a series of years. 

15. Evening school statistics, 1918-1919. 

16. Grammar school graduates for a series of years. 

17. Attendance statistics of all schools for a series of years. 

18. Statistics of the high school for a series of years. 

19. Promotions, junior high schools, 1919. 
19a Promotions, elementary schools, 1919. 

CONCERNING TEACHERS. 

20. Resignations of teachers, 1919. 

21. Teachers elected in 1919. 

22. Leave of absence of teachers. 

23. Transfers of teachers. 

24. Number of teachers employed for a series of years. 

STATISTICAL AND GENERAL TABLES. 

25. Changes in text-books, 1919. 

26. High and Junior High school graduation exercises, 1919. 

27. Vocational school graduation exercises, 1919. 

28. Organization of school board for 1920. 

29. Teachers in service January, 1920. 

30. Officers in service January, 1920. 

31. School janitors. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 
SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



129 



1.— POPULATION AND SCHOOL CENSUS. 

Population, state census, 1895 

Population, United States census, 1900 

Population, state census, 1905 

Population, United States census, 1910 

Population, state census, 1915 

Children between five and sixteen years of age, April, 1919, 
by school census 

2.— SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

Number of school buildings in June 

Number of classrooms in use in June 

Valuation of school property 



3.— TEACHERS. 



In high schools 

In junior high schools ., 

In elementary schools 

In kindergartens 

Total in elementary schools 
Vocational school for boys 
Vocational school for girls 

Atypical classes 

Cadet teachers 

Special 



Total 



=1918 

70 

108 

204 

8 

212 

6 

7 

3 

2 

10 

418 



4.— ATTENDANCE FOR YEAR. 



Entire enrollment for the year. 

Average number belonging 

Average number attending 

Per cent, of daily attendance 

High school graduates 

Junior High school graduates .... 
Grammar school graduates 



*1918 

14,256 

12,656 

11,798 

93.2 

322 

374 

207 



69 

106 

206 

8 

214 

6 

6 

3 

2 

11 

417 



*1919 

14,039 

12,733 

11,609 

91.2 

310 

596 



52,200 
61,643 
69,272 
77,236 
86,854 

15,167 



30 

388 

$2,164,600 

Change 
— 1 
—2 
+2 


+2 


— 1 





+1 



— 1 

Change 
—217 

+77 

—189 

—2.0 

—22 
+222 



5.— COST OF SCHOOL MAINTENANCE. 



Salaries of teachers 

Salaries of officers 

Cost of books and supplies 

Cost of light 

Cost of janitors' services . 

Cost of fuel 

Rent of Armory 

Total cost of day and ev- 
ening schools 

Per capita cost 

Cost of high school instruc- 
tion 

Per capita cost 



*1918 
$401,457 

9,131 
33,587 

6,966 
42,081 
35,839 



29 
26 
26 
05 
71 
20 



*1919 

$426,587 

11,142 

33,225 

8,820 

55,709 

22,959 

882 



31 

89 
26 
72 
67 
73 
50 



Change 

+$25,130 

+2,011 

—362 

+1,854 

+13,627 

—12,879 

+ 882 



02 
63 
00 
67 
96 
47 
50 



529,062 77 

39 42 

84,738 45 

64 64 



559,328 08 

43 93 

87,112 01 

51 73 



+30,265 31 

+4 51 

+2,373 56 

—12 91 



♦School year. 



130 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

6.— MISCELLANEOUS. 

*1918 *1919 Change 

Paid for new school build- 
ings $100,177 02 $104,066 80 +$3,889 78 

Repairs and permanent im- 
provements 30,125 56 20,491 59 —9,633 97 

Total school expenditures.. 659,365 35 683,886 47 +24,521 12 

Number of dollars spent 
to maintain schools out 
of every $1,000 of valua- 
tion 6 25 6 43 +0 18 

Valuation of city 84,639,280 00 87,353,424 00 +2,714,144 00 

Number of dollars spent for 
all school purposes out 
of every $1,000 of valua- 
tion 7 79 7 82 . +0 03 



♦School year. Cost of the Schools. 

The total amount spent for the maintenance of the schools 
of Somerville for the school year ending June 30, 1919, is 
$559,328.08. 

This includes the sums spent for care of school buildings, 

including janitors' services, fuel, light, and school telephones ; 

the amount paid for salaries of officers, and the amount spent 

for school supplies ; and the sum paid for salaries of teachers. 

The expenditure for care for school buildings is wholly in 

charge of the City Government. 

The amount paid for janitors is $55,709 67 

The cost of fuel is 22,959 73 

The cost of light is 8,820 72 

Rental of Armory 882 50 

A total cost of $88,372 62 

The cost per capita 6 94 

Cost of repairs $20,491 59 

The second important expenditure is wholly under the 
control of the School Committee and is covered by what is 
known as the ^'School Contingent'' appropriation. The fol- 
lowing is the itemized account : — 





Day Schools. 


Evening Schools. 


Expenditures. 


Total. 


High and 
^'ocational 


Elementary 


High and 
Vocational 


Elementary 


Officers' Salaries 


$11,142.89 
2,598.10 
8,488.14 

18,750.48 
3,388.54 










Office Expenses 










Textbooks 

Stationery and Supplies and 
other Expenses of Instruction 
Miscellaneous (Tuition, etc)... 


. $3,068.11 

8,839.48 
1,165.98 


$5,406.56 

9.741.80 
2,130.18 


$2.04 

140.13 
72.11 


$11.43 

29.07 
20.27 


Total 

* 


$44,368.15 


$13,073.57 


$17,278.54 


$214.28 $60.77 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



131 



The third, and by far the largest, element of the cost of 
schools is the sura spent for the salaries of teachers. This 
expenditure is under the control of the School Committee. 

The following statement shows the distribution of the 
sums paid for salaries : — 



Expenditures. 



Supervisors 
Principals.. 
Teachers ... 

Total 



Total. 



$6,590.25 

34,927.25 

385,069.81 



$426,587.31 



Day Schools. 



J"5i}/"li Elementary 



Vocational 



11,417.00 

10,301.11 

122,440.80 



$134,158.91 



$5,173.25 

23,529.14 

257,003.01 



$285,705.40 



Evening Schools. 



High and 
Vocational 



$467.00 
4,171.00 



$4,638.00 



Elementary 



$630.00 
1,455.00 



$2,085.00 



The total outlay for all school purposes includes all of 
the preceding and the sums spent for schoolhouse repairs and 
new buildings. 

The total outlay for the school year ending June 30, 1919, 
is as follows: — 

Care $88,372 62 

Contingent 44,368 15 

Salaries 426,587 31 

Total for school maintenance $559,328 08 

Paid for repairs 20,491 59 

Paid for new buildings 104,066 80 

Total for all school purposes $683,886 47 

Each dollar of the sum spent for the support of schools 
has been divided in the following proportion : — 



1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 

Janitors' salaries $0,079 $0,074 $0,077 $0,076 $0,079 $0,097 

Heat and light 0.060 0.054 0.059 0.066 0.081 0.057 

Administration 0.018 0.017 0.017 0.018 0.017 0.017 

School supplies 0.065 0.067 0.058 0.062 0.064 0.067 

Teachers' salaries 0.778 0.788 0.789 0.778 0.759 0.762 

Total $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 

Per Capita Cost. The proper method of comparison of 
the cost of schools year by year is to consider the sum spent 
for each pupil in the average membership- In this computa- 
tion we exclude the cost of evening schools, and the_ vocational 
schools. The following shows : — 



132 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

THE PER CAPITA COST OF DAY SCHOOLS FOR 1918 AND 1919. 





High Schools. 


Grammar and 
Primary Schools. 


All Day Schools. 




1918. 


1919. 


Change 


1918. 


1919. 


Change 


1918. 


1919. 


Change 


Instruction 

Supplies 


$65.79 

7.74 

11.27 


$52.59 
5.21 
9.67 


—$13.20 
—2.53 
—1.60 


$25.16 
1.39 
6.02 


$26.35 
1.41 
5.63 


+$1.19 
+0.02 
—0.39 


$30.78 
2.48 
6.34 


$32.75 
2.52 
6.58 


+$1.97 
+0.04 


Care 


+0.24 






Total 


$84.80 


$67.47 


—$17.33 


$32.57 


$33.39 


+$0.82 


$39.60 


$41.85 


+$2.25 







Including the cost of maintenance of evening schools, the 
per capita cost is as follows : — 

1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 

Cost of Instruction $24 90 $26 25 $26 72 $29 58 $31 82 

Cost of Supplies 2 03 1 88 2 05 2 40 2 45 

Cost of Care 3 92 4 41 4 61 6 09 6 43 

Total $30 85 $32 54 $33 38 $38 07 $40 70 

An examination of these tables shows that we have paid 
113.20 less for the instruction of each pupil in the High School 
than in 1918, and |>2.53 less per pupil for supplies. 

The grammar and primary schools have cost f 1.19 more 
per pupil for instruction, and two cents more for supplies. 

The amount spent for the school year 1919 was 16.43, or 
18 cents more than was spent in 1918. The amount yielded for 
each child in the average membership of the schools for 1919, 
not including the vocational schools, was |40.70. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Teachers' Salaries. 



DO 



The salaries paid to teachers in January, 1920, are as 
follows : 



1 man $4,100 1 

1 man 3,500 1 

1 man 2,850 1 

11 men, 1 woman, 2,700 1 

3 men 2,600 9 

2 men 2,500 200 

1 woman 2,400 1 

6 men, 1 woman, 2,300 14 

2 men 2,200 17 

5 men 2,100 4 

6 men 2,000 5 

2 women 1,950 16 

7 men, 2 woiiien 1,900 2 

2 men 1,850 3 

4 women 1,800 1 

1 woman 1,750 1 

5 women 1,700 

Temporary teachers and cadets 
not included in the list given above. 



man, 4 women $1,650 

man, 23 women 1,600 

man, 17 women 1,550 

woman 1,525 

women 1,500 

women 1,450 

man, 19 women 1,400 

women 1,350 

women 1,300 

women 1,275 

women 1,250 

women 1,200 

women 1,150 

women 1,100 

man (part time) 1,050 

woman 1,000 

or apprentice teachers are 



SIGHT AND HEARING. 

The following gives the results of the eye and ear tests : — 

Eyes. 



Tested 

Defective 

Per cent, defective 

Notices sent to parents 

Professionally treated 

Ears. 



Tested 

Defective 

Per cent, defective 

Notices sent to parents 
Professionally treated . 



1919 


1918 


Change 


11,840 


11,473 


367-h 


1,516 


1,557 


41— 


12.8% 


13.6% 


0.8%— 


1,084 


950 




202 


153 




1919 


1918 


Change 


12,681 


12,591 


9H- 


219 


182 


37-f- 


1.72% 


1.4% 


0.3% + 


149 


101 




27 


13 





134 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 2. — Cost of Maintaining ScFiools. 

FOR SCHOOL YEAR 1918-19. 



SCHOOLvS. 



From School Appropriation. 



High 

Eastern Jr 

Southern Jr 

Northern Jr 

Western Jr 

Prescott 

Hanscom 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

Cummmgs , 

Edgerly 

Glines 

Forster 

Bingham 

Carr 

Morse 

Proctor 

Durell 

Burns 

Brown 

Highland 

Cutler 

Li icoln 

Lowe 

Atypical 

Boys' Vocational. 
Girls' Vocational. 
Evening 



Total. 



Instruction 

and 
Supervision. 



$88,568, 
21,897, 
26,770. 
23,363. 
33,572, 

4,528, 
11,298. 
11,178, 

6,638. 

7,441. 

6,274. 
13,064. 

4,114. 
13,481. 
16,105. 

4,294. 
16,129. 
15,551. 
11,569. 

7,317. 

4,128. 

7,844. 
12,080. 
13,500. 
18,38L 

4,155. 

8,188. 

2,589. 
10,001. 

6,843. 

6,852. 



.50 
.41 

,57 
.88 
.72 
.36 
,69 
.19 
,73 
,56 
,27 
21 
69 
23 
25 
60 
89 
69 
89 
83 
92 
45 
51 
56 
03 
91 
71 
54 
77 
89 
75 



$437,730.20 



Supplies. 



^8,777.19 
1,948.60 
5,080.92 
2,027.72 
2,295.37 
399.24 
451.04 
744.23 
247.38 
425.60 
351.10 
969.53 
179.38 
935.19 
634.05 
139.24 
707.16 
893.42 
633.38 
499.39 
168.77 
342.74 
552.54 
468.01 
1,290.91 
235.52 
383.89 
86.20 
840.71 
165.05 
351.79 



Spent by City 
Government. 



Care. 



$16,276.22 
3,201.46 
3,856.65 
4,184.93 
8,657.99 
1,117.92 
1,963.27 
2,967.04 
1,487.24 
2,054.30 
1,478.60 
2,188.96 
1,678.02 
2,161.74 
2,405.28 
1,288.28 
2,720.18 
2,829.22 
2,336.07 
1,793.64 
1,212.78 
1,717.80 
3,237.70 
2,308.35 
4,288.16 
1,427.83 
1,699.62 
624.16 
],962.44 
1,369.02 
1,877.75 



,225.26 



$88,372.62 



Total 

$113,621.91 

27,047.47 

35,708.14 

29,576.53 

44,526.08 

6,045.52 

13,713.00 

14,889.46 

8,373.35 

9,921.46 

8,103.97 

16,222.70 

5,972.09 

16,578.16 

19,144.58 

5,722.12 

19,557.23 

19.274.33 

14,539.34 

9,610.86 

5,510.47 

9,904.99 

15,870.75 

16,276.92 

23,960.10 

5,819.26 

10,272.22 

3,299.90 

12,804.92 

8,377.96 

9,082.29 



$559,328.08 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



137 



Table 3. — Per Capita Cost of Maintaining Schools. 

FOR SCHOOL YEAR 1918-19. 



Schools. 


Instruction 

and 
Supervision. 


Supplies. 


Care. 


TotaL 


High 


$52.59 
47.19 
39.90 
38.43 
38.55 
23.83 
24.09 
30.88 
30.73 
23.11 
26.03 
24.19 
24.35 
23.53 
25.85 
23.73 
28.96 
25.37 
27.81 
24.56 
25.49 
24.75 
29.11 
35.81 
24.74 
25.03 
23.53 
55.09 
11.75 

26.35 
31.82 


$5.21 
4.20 
7.57 
3.34 
2.64 
2.10 

.96 
2.06 
1.15 
1.32 
1.46 
1.80 
1.06 
1.63 
1.02 

.77 
1.27 
1.46 
1.52 
1.70 
1.04 
1.08 
1.33 
1.24 
1.74 
1.42 
1.10 
1.83 

.60 

1.41 
2.45 


$9.67 
6.90 
5.75 
6.88 
9.94 
5.88 
4.19 
8.20 
6.89 
6.38 
6.14 
4.05 
9.93 
3.77 
3.86 
7.12 
4.88 
4.62 
5.62 
6.02 
7.49 
5.42 
7.80 
6.12 
5.77 
8.60 
4.88 

13.28 
3.22 

5.63 
6.43 


$67.47 


Eastern Jr 


58.29 


Southern Jr 


53.22 


Northern Jr 


48.65 


Western Jr 


51.13 


Prescott 


31.81 


Hanscom 


29.24 


Bennett 


41.14 


Baxter 


38.77 


Knapp 


30.81 


Perrv 


33.63 


Pope 


30.04 


Cunimings 


35.34 


Edgerlv 


28.93 


GHnes 


30.73 


Forster 


31.62 


Bingham 


35.11 


Carr 


31.45 


Morse 


34.95 


Proctor 


32.28 


Durell 


34.02 


Burns 


31.25 


Brown 


38.24 


Highland 


43.17 


Cutler 


32.25 


Lincoln 


35.05 


Lowe 


29.51 


Atypical 


70.20 


Evening 


15.57 


Elementary 


33.39 


All schools (without vo- 
cational) 


40.70 






Boys' Vocational 

Girls' Vocational 


163.96 
236.00 


13.78 
5.69 


32.17 
47.21 


209.91 
288.90 







138 



ANNUAL REI'ORTS. 



Table 4. — Annual Cost of Maintaining the Schools. 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 

Amounts are given to the nearest dollar and include what has been paid 
for maintaining day and evening schools of all grades. 





Average 
Member- 
ship. 


From School Appro- 
priation. 


Sum Spent under Direction of 
City Government. 




Year. 


Instruction 
and Super- 
vision. 


School 
Supplies. 


Light. 


Heating. 


Janitors. 


School 
Tele- 
phones. 


Total. 


1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 


11,710 
11,856 
12,320 
12,903 
13,191 
12,770 
12,656 
12,733 


$306,709 
320,744 
338,587 
357,581 
363,948 
376,138 
410,589 
437,730 


$30,319 
25,877 
26,843 
29,389 
26,098 
29,221 
33,587 
33,225 


$5,995 
5,842 
6,448 
5,755 
6,233 
5,429 
6,966 
8,821 


$15,676 
16,055 
18,952 
18,366 
20,197 
25,487 
35,839 
22,960 


$30,219 
32,939 
33,711 
32,674 
34,667 
35,718 
42,063 
55,710 


$512 
o42 
624 
213 


$389,431 
402,092t 
425,165 
443,978 
451,143 


1917 




471,993 


1918 
1919 


18 


529,062 
*559,328 



t $92.50 included for rental of church for schoolhouse purposes in Ward 7. 
* Includes $882.50, rent of Armory. 



Table 5. — Annual Cost Per Capita of Maintaining Schools. 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 

[Based on the average membership.] 















Ratio of 




Instruction 


School 


Janitors, 




Assessors' 


Cost of 


Year. 


and 


Supply 


Heat and 


Total. 


Valuation 


School Main- 




Supervision. 


Expenses. 


Light. 




of City. 


tenance to 
Valuation. 


1912 


$23 61 


$2 12 


$3 99 


$29 72 


$69,632,540 


$ .00556 


1913 


24 54 


1 91 


4 18 


30 63 


71,848,811 


.00559 


1914 


24 55 


1 89 


4 27 


30 71 


74,887,800 


.00568 


1915 


24 90 


2 03 


3 92 


30 85 


77,153,500 


.00575 


1916 


26 25 


1 88 


4 41 


32 54 


79,304,329 


.00569 


1917 


26 72 


2 05 


4 61 


33 38 


78,921,472 


.00595 


1918 


29 58 


2 40 


6 09 


38 07 


84,639,280 


.00625 


1919 


31 82 


2 45 


6 43 


40 70 


87,353,424 


.00643 



Table 6. — Amount Spent Annually for all School Purposes. 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 




For years prior to 1912 see School Report of 1917. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



139 



TABLE 7.— POPULATION AND SCHOOL CENSUS. 
For School Year 1918-19. 



1842 . 


1,013 


1900 . 


. 61,643 


1911 . 


. 78,000 


1850 . 


3,540 


1901 . 


. 63,000 


1912 . 


. 80,000 


1860 . 


8,025 


1902 . 


. 65,273 


1913 . 


. 81,000 


1865 . , 


9,366 


1903 . 


. 67,500 


1914 . 


. 85,000 


1870 . . 


14,693 


1905 . 


. 69,272 


1915 . 


. 86,854 


1875 . , 


21,594 


1906 . 


. 70,875 


1916 . 


. 88,000 


1880 . . 


24,985 


1907 . 


. 72,000 


1917 . 


. 90.000 


1885 . . 


29.992 


1908 . 


. 75,500 


1918 . 


. 91,000 


1890 . 


. 40,117 


1909 . 


. 75,500 


1919 . 


. 91,500 


1895 . . 


52,200 


1910 . 


. 77,236 







• School Censu<s. 

Number of children between 5 and 15 years of age, inclusive, 
April 1, 1919 



15,167 



School Registration. 

Number of children between 5 and 15 years of age, inclusive, 
April 1, 1919: — 

In public schools 11,826 

In private schools 2,669 

Total 

Number of compulsory school age, 7 to 13, 
In public schools, males . 
females 



In private schools, males . 
females 



Total 10,886 



^ 




14,495 


inclusive : 


— 




• 


4,417 




• 


4,482 


8,899 






, 


948 




• 


1,039 


1,987 







140 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 8. — Attendance of the Public Schools for the School Year 

1918-1919. 







-ti 


p. 


ci 


v. » 


bo 


60 

a 


la CO 






1^ 




o S 


P 




w o 

12 


Schools. 


a o 


5r! ® 




®+3 






O CO 




w 


§ 


< 


!^< 


o.S 


6 


*74 


High 


1,854 


1,684 


1,545 


91.7 


1,775 


1,581 


20 


Eastern Jr. High 


530 


464 


424 


91.3 


490 


443 


26 


Southern Jr. High 


741 


671 


606 


90.3 


690 


645 


22 


Northern Jr. High 


673 


608 


554 


91.1 


631 


593 


31 


Western Jr . H igh 


945 


871 


812 


93.2 


906 


808 


4 


Prescott 


210 


190 


170 


89.4 


187 


196 


10 


Hanscom 


535 


469 


420 


89.5 


480 


463 


10 


Bennett 


396 


362 


325 


89.7 


349 


365 


6 


Baxter 


252 


216 


197 


91.2 


208 


221 


8 


Knapp 


342 


322 


298 


92.5 


316 


321 


6 


Perry 


256 


241 


222 


92.1 


241 


248 


12 


Pope 


589 


540 


491 


90.9 


541 


536 


4 


Cummings 


190 


169 


155 


91.7 


168 


170 


12 


Edgerly 


639 


573 


516 


90.0 


581 


558 


14 


Ghnes 


673 


623 


568 


91.1 


587 


628 


4 


Forster 


214 


181 


165 


91.1 


196 


174 


15 


Bingham 


634 


557 


502 


90.1 


564 


562 


15 


Carr 


657 


613 


560 


91.3 


613 


594 


10 


Morse 


451 


416 


379 


91.1 


431 


398 


7 


Proctor 


335 
177 
356 


298 
162 
317 


276 
146 

288 


92.6 
90.1 
90.8 


317 

168 
328 


298 


4 


Durell 


153 


8 


Burns 


309 


10 


Brown 


447 
410 


415 
377 


381 
353 


91.8 
93.6 


417 
375 


394 


n 


Highland 


387 


17 


Cutler 


804 


743 


675 


90.8 


755 


712 


4 


Lincoln 


199 


166 


147 


88.5 


187 


164 


8 


Lowe » 


372 


348 


312 


89.6 


367 


350 


3 


Atypical 


52 


47 


41 


87.2 


45 


47 


6 


Boys' Vocational 


69 


61 


56 


91.8 


55 


54 


7 


Girls' Vocational 


37 


29 


25 


86.1 


29 


25 


388 


Total 


14,039 


12,733 


11,609 


91.2 


12,997 


12,397 


370 


Total for 1917-18 


14,256 


12,656 


11,798 


93.2 


13,200 


12,235 









'Includes all rooms used for school exercises. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



141 



Table 9. — Statistics of High School for School Year September 11, 1918 

to June 27, 1919. 



Number of teachers, including head master 






70 


Number of days school kept . 






162* 


Number enrolled 








1,854 


Average number belonging . 








1,684 


Average daily attendance 








1,545.2 


Tardinesses 








3,250 


Di&missals . . . . , . 








425 


In Class 1922, September . 








615 


June . 








561 


Per cent, of loss . 








8.8 


In Class 1921, September* 








526 


June . 








452 


Per cent, of loss 








14.1 


In Class 1920, September . 








304 


June 








260 


Per cent, of loss 








14.5 


In Class 1919-B, September 








318 


June 








301 


Per cent, of loss 








5.3 


In Class 1919-A, September . 








12 


February 








13 


Per cent, of gain 








8.3 


Special Students, September . 








6 


June 








7 


Per cent, of gain 








16.6 


Total, September . 








1,781 


June 








1,581 


Per cent, of loss 








11.2 


Number of graduates, male . 








108 


Number of graduates, female 








202 


Total 








310 


Average age, male graduates 








18 yrs. 1 mo. 


Average age, female graduates 








18 yrs. 3 mos 


Number entering college 








58 


Number of graduates entering technical schools . 




9 


Number of graduates entering normal schools 




16 


Cost of instruction ...... 




$87,112 01 


Cos! of supplies . .... 








8,145 35 


Total cost 








$95,257 36 


Per capita cost of instruction 








$51 73 


Per capita cost of supplies . 








4 83 


Total cost per capita 








$56 56 



* School sessions were omitted for 21 days on account of epidemic of in- 
fluenza. 



142 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 10. — Pupils by Grades, June, 1919. 





Grade. 


Teachers. 


Pupils. 






Men. 


Women. 


CO 

O 


CO 

'6 


i 


Never in 


School. 




i 


c 

CO 

ca 


First Grade 
Before. 


Hi^h 


Special 










7 
195 
173 
254 
326 


7 
301 
260 
452 
561 




Twelfth 








106 

87 

198 

235 




•• 


Eleventh 










'• 


Tenth 










•• 


Ninth 












Total 












18 


51 




626 


955 


1.581 






Ninth 






Junior High 








280 
397 
466 


356 
428 
562 


636 

825 

1,028 






Eighth 










•• 


Seventh ...., 












Total 












15 


91 




1.143 


1.346 


2.489 






Sixth 






Graniniar 


6 


30 
34 
33 


1 


573 
626 
665 


595 
695 
648 


1.168 
1.321 
1,313 






Fifth 




it 


Fourth 










Total Grammar 

Third 










6 


97 


1 


1.864 


1.938 


3.802 




Primary 




31 
33 
36 




657 
724 
756 


657 
676 
705 


1.314 
1.400 
1.461 




Second 




1 

1 




t« 


First 




1.278 




Total Primary 










100 


2 


2.137 


2.038 


4,175 






Total Grammar 
and Primary 

Kindergarten 








6 


197 


3 


4.001 


3,976 


7.977 








4 


4 


106 
54 


99 


205 

54 
25 
47 
19 






Boys' Vocational... 
Girls' Vocational... 
Atypical 


6 


• 




6 
3 

8 
2 




25 
14 
13 








33 
6 






Special 


3 








Cadets 








Grand Total 
















48 


362 


7 


5,969 


6.428 


12.397 











SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



143 



Table 11. — Pupiisi in High, Junior High, Elementary and Vocational 

Schools, 1918-1919. 





Si o 


Junior 

High 

Schools. 


Grammar 

and Primary 

Schools. 


Kinder- 
gartens. 


Vocational 

School 

for Boys. 


Vocational 

School 
for Girls. 


■11 


o 


Annual enrollment 


1,854 
1,684 
1.545 

91.7 
3.250 

525 


2889 
2614 
2396 
91.7 
1794 
617 


8,930 1 208 
8,115 183 
7,382 164 


69 
61 
56 
91.8 
37 
7 
55 
54 


37 

29 

25 

86.1 

309 


52 
47 
41 
87.2 
97 
7 
45 
47 


14,039 


Average membership 


12,733 


Average attendance 


11,609 


Per cent, of atfendance 


91.0 
4,257 
1,653 


89.6 


91.2 


Number cases of tardiness 


9,744 


Number cases of dismissal 




2,809 


Membership, October, 1918 

Membership, June, 1919 


1,775 1 2717 
1,581 2489 


8,178 

8,016 

71 


198 
185 


29 
25 


12,997 
12,397 


No. cases corp. punishment 




18 


-89 



Table 12. — Number of Pupils Admitted to Grade 1 



School. 



Prescott .. 
Hanscom . . 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

Cummings 

Edgerly 

Glines 

Forster 

Bingham . . . 

Carr 

Morse 

Proctor 

Durell 

Burns 

Brown 

Hodgkins.. 

Cutler 

Lincoln 

Lowe 



Total I 955 



Grand Total 



1915-16 


Sept. 


Feb. 


45 


23 


66 


20 


73 


26 


31 


15 


27 


14 


64 


12 


36 


8 


51 


13 


26 


17 


43 


26 


44 


33 


51 


25 


56 


21 


61 


23 


25 


16 


23 


11 


16 


17 


47 


22 


19 


23 


43 





44 


18 


64 


77 


955 


460 


1^ 


15 



1916 



Sept. 



40 
85 
72 
35 
19 
27 
46 
40 
33 
57 
25 
52 
51 
65 
38 
21 
59 
70 
41 
73 
55 
42 

1,046 



1917 



Sept. 



49 
100 
84 
32 
42 
43 
51 
71 
45 
91 
31 
102 
92 
67 
46 
45 
107 
77 
50 
96 
45 
90 

1,456 



1918 



Sept. 



46 
114 
67 
31 
30 
42 
55 
35 
43 
86 
21 
65 
79 
82 
48 
28 
65 
63 

136 
60 

82 

1,278 



144 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 13. — Promotions to Grade 10 of High School, June, 1919. 



From Grade 9 In 


S 
o 

ft 

s 

> 


o 

fe5 


S 
o 
1 


High School 



117 
163 

128 
198 


511 
117 
163 

127 
189 


455 


Eastern Junior High School 


96 


Southern Junior High School 


132 


Northern Junior High School 


102 


Western Junior High School 


162 






Total 


596 


1,107 


947 



In the process of reducing the number of years in the 
school course from thirteen to twelve there were brought to- 
gether in September, 1918, two classes of the high school first 
year or freshman grade. This grade was denominated the 
ninth and one-half of the class was conducted in the high school 
as a first year class and the other half in the four junior high 
schools as senior classes. In September, 1919, these classes 
were united in the high school and formed a 10th grade class 
of double the usual size. The high school now consists of grades 
10, 11, and 12. 



1918 


1919 


Change 


542 
1,245 
1,336 


571 
1,463 
1,550 


-1-29 
-h218 
-h214 


348 


425 


-h77 


270 


329 


+59 


216 


260 


+44 


42 


48 


+6 


12 


17 


+5 


49 


78 


+29 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 145 



Table 14. — Comparative Statistics of tFie Attendance Department for 

the Scliool Year 1918-1919. 



Number of visits to the schools 

Number of visits to the homes 

Number of cases investigated . 

Number of cases found to be truan- 
cy or absenteeism 

Number of different pupils who were 
truants or habitual absentees 

Number who were truants for the 
first time ..... 

Number who were truants for the 
second time ..... 

Number who were truants for three 
or more times .... 

Number of girls who were truants or 
absentees ..... 

Number of cases of parental neglect 
of children found and reported to 
charitable institutions . 

Number of cases of removal of chil- 
dren from the custody of parents 
by order of the court . 

Number of visits to mercantile or 
manufacturing establishments 

Number of minors found to be work- 
ing without employment certifi- 
cates ...... 

Number of employment certificates 
issued to boys .... 

Number of employment certificates 
reissued to boys .... 

Number of employment certificates 
issued to girls .... 

Number of employment certificates 
reissued to girls .... 

Number of educational literate cer- 
tificates issued to minors over 16 
years of age (first issue) 

Number of newspaper licenses issued 
to boys 12 to 16 years of age . 

Number of transfer cards investi- 
gated ...... 

Number of truants in the County 
Training school at the close of 
the year ..... 

Amount paid for board of truants 

• Includes reissues. 



2 


2 





52 


56 


+4 


121 


70 


—51 


702 


544 


—158 


480 


364 


1—116 


501 


502 


+1 


254 


487 


+233 


*1,519 


1,262 


•••• 


140 


108 


—32 


1,488 


1,333 


—155 


17 

$788.13 


22 
$850.13 


+5 
+$62.00 



146 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 14. — (Concluded). — Comparative Statistics of the Attendance 

Depart nnent. 

Fop the School Year 1918-1919. 

Disposition of truancy and habitual absentee cases: — 



Warned and returned to -school . 
Transferred to other schools 
Obtained certificates (14 to 16 years) 
Left school (over 16 years) . 
Removed from city 
Brought before court and returned to school 
Brought before court and sent to Training School . 
Parents brought before court for keeping children out of 
school (convicted) ....... 

Sent to Lyman School ....... 

Given in charge of State Board of Charity . 

Given in charge of Home for Destitute Catholic Children 

Given in charge of House of Good Shepherd . 

Sent to Industrial School for Boys, Shirley . 



211 
13 
35 
13 
25 
6 
11 

2 
7 
1 
3 
2 
1 

330 



Table 14-a. — Truancies and Habitual Absenteeism by Ages and Grades. 



« 








BY AGES. 












Grades. 


















Total. 






i 


















16 or 






6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


Over 




I 


8 


18 
5 


3 1 

18 
9 

2 


5 

14 
4 


""2 
11 

10 
6 




6 
17 


5 


■ T 




24 


II 


1 


* 1 

16 
13 


14 

8 


31 


Ill 


36 


IV 






52 


V 






50 


VI 










1 


8 


7 


23 


19 


6 




64 


VII 












1 


10 


27 


22 


8 


1 


■69 


VIII 














7 


16 


22 


11 




56 


IX 

















5 


4 


5 


3 


17 


X 
















1 


1 


2 


4 


8 


XI 


















3 


1 


4 


XII 




















1 


1 


Boys' A^oc'l 





















i 




1 


Girls' Voc'l 


















1 


1 




2 


Ungraded.. 




4 


1 




2 






1 


2 






10 


Total 


4 


27 


33 


23 


32 


1 
39 


46 


97 


76 


38 


10 


425 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT, 



147 



Table 15. — Attendance in Elementary Evening Schools from October, 

1918, to June, 1919. 





Male 
Female 

Total 

Male 
Female 


Bell. 


Highland. 


Total. 


TTnrollprl 


153 

62 


53 

29 


206 
91 






215 


82 


297 


Ave. membership 


61 
27 


30 
21 


91 

48 




Total 


88 


51 


139 


Ave. attendance 


Male 
Female 


51 
23 


23 

17 


74 

40 




Total 


74 


40 


114 


Per cent. Att. out of No. 
belonging 




88.1 
34.4 


78.4 
48.7 


82.0 


Per cent. Att. out of No. 
enrolled 




38.4 








Ave. No. of teachers '. 


- 

Male 
Female 


1 

7 


1 
3 


2 




10 




Total 


8 


4 


12 


No. of sessions 




70 


70 










Teachers, cost of 




$1,286.00 
592.40 


$694.00 
286.53 


$1,980.00 
878.93 


Janitors, fuel, supplies, 
and light, cost of 












Total 


$1,878.40 


$980.53 


$2,858.9 


Cost per pupil per evening 




$0,305 
26.83 

21.34 

25.38 


$0,270 
14.01 

19.21 

24.51 


$0,293 


Cost per evening 




40.84 


Cost per pupil in ave. 

membership 




20.57 


Cost per pupil in ave. at- 
tendance 




25.08 









148 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 15. — (Concluded). — Evening High School — Season of 

1918-1919. 









Male 


Female 


Total 


Enrolled .... 


, , 




286 


343 


629 


Average membership 


, , 




149 


214 


363 


Average attendance 


, . 




123 


147 


270 


Number of teachers 


, , 


21 








Number of sessions 


, , 


52 








Cost of Instruction . 


, , 






$3,424 00 




Cost of janitor, fuel, 


supplies, 










and light . 


• • 






1,120 25 . 




Total cost . 




$4,544 25 





Cost per pupil per evening . $0 241 

Average attendance: November 454, December 294, January 230, 
February 184, March 191. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



149 



Table 16. — Promotions from Elementary to Junior High Schools. 





1919 


Knapp. 


62 


Perry. 


34 


Pope. 


139 


Edgerly. 


136 


Glines. 


88 


Forster, 


35 


Bingham. 


66 


Carr. 


106 


Morse. 


46 


Proctor. 


44 


Brown. 


43 


Highland. 


143 


Cutler. 


126 


Total. 


1068 


Average 
Membership 
of Elementary 
Schools. 


8345 


Per cent, 
of Average 
Membership 
Promoted 


12.79 



150 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 17. — Attendance Statistics. 

FOK A SERIES OF YEARS. 















Ratio of 






Average 


Average 


Per cent, of 


Number of 


Tardiness 


December 


Enrollment 


Membership 


Attendance 


Attendance 


Tardi- 
nesses 


to Average 
Attendance 


1912 


13,272 


11,710 


11,083 


94.6 


6,307 


0.569 


1913 


13,491 


11,903 


11,216 


94.2 


7,354 


0.655 


1914 


13,932 


12,320 


11,610 


94.2 


7,380 


0.635 


1915 


14,505 


12,903 


12,189 


94.5 


8,000 


0.656 


1916 


14,647 


13,191 


12,323 


93.4 


9,373 


0.761 


1917 


13,967 


12,770 


11,933 


93.7 


7,325 


0.613 


1918 


14,256 


12,656 


11,798 


93.2 


8,970 


0.760 


1919 


14,039 


12,733 


11,609 


91.2 


9,744 


0.839 



Table 18. — Membership, Etc., of High School. 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Year. 


Average 
Membership 
all Schools. 


Largest 
Number in 
High School. 


Per cent, of 

Average 

Membership 

of all 

Schools. 


Number of 
Graduates of 
High School. 


Per cent, of 

Average 

Membership 

of all 

Schools. 


1912 


11,710 


2,023 


17.28 


296 


2.53 


1913 


11,903 


2,081 


17.48 


296 


2.48 


1914 


11,610 


2,111 


18.18 


273 


2.35 


1915 


12,903 


2,258 


17.50 


311 


2.41 


1916 


13,191 


2,288 


17.35 


348 


2.64 


1917 


12,770 


1,973 


15.45 


340 


2.66 


1918 


12,656 


1,520 


12.01 


332 


2.62 


1919 


12,733 


1,854 


14.56 


310 


2.43 



For years prior to 1912 see School Report of 1917. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



151 



Table 19. — Promotions for School Year Ending June 27, 1919. 

Junior High Schools. 



Grade 


On June 
Promotion List 


Unconditionally 

Promoted to 

Next Grade 


Promoted 
on Trial 


Retarded 


I 

II 

III 


1089 
810 
647 


846 
626 
560 


163 

119 

36 


80 
65 
49 


Total 


2546 


2032 318 


194 



Percentage of Promotions for School Year Ending June 27, 1919. 

Junior High Schools. 



Grade 


On June 
Promotion List 


Unconditionally 
Promoted to 
Next Grade 


Promoted 
on Trial 


Retarded 


I 

II 

III 


100 
100 
100 


77.7 
77.3 
86.9 


15.0 

14.7 

5.5 


7.3 

8.0 
7.6 


Total 


100 


79.9 


12.5 


7.6 



152 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 19-a. — Promotions for School Year Ending June 27, 1919. 

Grammar Grades. 



Grade. 


On June 
Promotion List. 


Unconditionally 

Promoted 
to next Grade. 


Promoted on Trial. 


'6 

o3 

Pi 


p 6 

si 

go 
^5 


Pm c 

AG 
*3 


Promotees 
Dropped Back 
■ after Three 
Months' Trial. 


I 
II 
III 
IV 
V 
YI 


1,515 
1,405 
1,331 
1,327 
1,307 
1,221 


1,150 
1,159 
1,101 
•1,072 
1,038 
947 


90 
120 
112 
124 
166 
160 


262 
119 
108 
110 
101 
108 


13 

10 

21 

2 

6 


6 
8 
9 
6 
15 
5 


1 
10 

7 
6 
1 

7 


Total 


8,106 


6,467 


772 


808 


59 


49 


32 



Percentage of Promotions for School Year Ending June 27, 1919. 



« 

Grade. 


en 

Sc 

a o 

OS 

o 
u 

Ph 


Unconditionally 

Promoted 
to next Grade. 


O tH 


'6 

a; 

Oi 


03 a3 

^5 


Special Promo- 
tions during Year. 


Promotees 
Dropped Back 

after Three 
Months' Trial. 


I 


100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 


75.9 

82.5 
82.7 
80.8 
79.4 
77.6 


6.0 
8.5 
8.4 
9.3 
12.7 
13.1 


17.3 

8.5 
8.1 

8.3 

7.7 - 
8.8 


.8 
.5 
.8 
1.6 
.2 
.5 


.4 
.6 

.7 

.5 

1.1 

.4 




II 

III 

IV 

V 


.7 
.5 
.5 


VI 


.6 


Average... 


100 


79.8 


9.5 


10.0 


.7 


.6 


.4 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



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SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



15: 



Table 22. — Leave of Absence of Teachers. 

Julia T. Connor, from September 1, 1919, to June 30, 1920. 
Nona E. Blackwell, from September 26, 1919, to June 30, 1920. 
M. Edith Callahan, from September 26, 1919, to June 30, 1920. 
Cora E. Crawford, from January 23, 1919, to June 30, 1919. 
Blanche E. Thompson, from September 1, 1919, to June 30, 1920. 
Eva G. Hardy, from October 27, 1919, to June 30, 1920. 
Elizabeth J. Baker, from October 1, 1919, to June 30, 1920. 



Cadets. 

Grace M. DriscoU Laura M, Flynn 

Elizabeth C. Sullivan 



Table 23. — Transfers of Teachers. 



Teachers 

Susie L. Luce . 
Francis A. Ryan 
Sophia C. Mague 
John S. Emerson 
Clara D. Eddy . 
Emma M. Damon 
Mary Donoghue 
Mary L. Gallagher 
Charles D. Brainard 

Florence A. Chaney 
Elsie M. Guthrie 
Mina J. Wendell 
Charles G. Ham 
Harriet M. Bell 
Marie Clifford . 
Frank W. Seabury 
Harlan P. Knight 



From 

Eastern Junior High . 
Eastern Junior High . 
Southern Junior High 
Northern Junior High 
Western Junior High . 
Girls' Vocational 
Girls' Vocational 
Bennett 
Edgerly, Bennett, 

Hanscom 
Pope 
Glines 
Morse 
Carr 

Highland 
Highland 
Highland, Burns 
Cutler, Lincoln 



To 

Carr 

Knapp, Perry & Baxter 

Western Junior H. 

Bennett 

Glines 

Western Junior High 

Northern Junior High 

Knapp 

Edgerly, Glines 
Pope, Hanscom 
Cutler 

Morse, Burns 
Carr, Cummings, Durell 
High 

Northern Junior High 
Northern Jr., Forster 
Cutler, Lincoln, High- 
land 



158 



ANNUAL RErORTS. 



Table 24. — Number of Teachers. 



FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Year. 


High 

School. 


Junior 

High 

Schools. 


Grammar 
Schools. 


Primary 
Schools. 


Special 
Teach- 
ers. 


Assistants 
not in 

Charge of 
Room. 


Men. 


Women 


Total. 


1912 


66t 

est 

75J 
76t 

m 

70J 
70t 
10% 




168 
166 
167 
172 
189 
136 
103 
96 


84* 

91* 

99* 

100* 

101* 


22 

28 
30 
31 
30 


9 
12 
20 
15 
15 
17 

9 


40 
39 
44 
45 
46 
49 
49 
48 


309 
326 
347 
349 
366 
374 
369 
370 


349 


1913 




365 


1914 




391 


1915 




394 


1916 




412 


1917 
1918 
1919 


65 
108 
106 


102* 33 
104* 28 
111* 26 


423 
418 
418 



*Ineluding four kindergartners. 



^Including secretary. 



Table 25. — Books Authorized for Use, 1919. 
For High School. 



As Text-Books. 

Jose-Armando Palacio Valdes — D. C. Heath & Company. 

El Capitan Veneno — D. Pedro A. de Alarcon-Henry Holt & Com- 
pany. 

Zaragueta - Howland - Silver, Burdett & Company. 

La Conjuracion De Venecia — Francisco Martinez De La Rosa — 
Benj. H. Sanborn & Company. 

Grammaire Francaise — Mary Stone Bruce — ^D. C. Heath & Com- 
pany. 

A First Spanish Course, Hills and Ford, — D. C. Heath & Co. 

El Pajaro Verde, Juan Valera, — Allyn & Bacon. 

Principles of Bookkeeping, Miner and Elwell, — Ginn & Co. 

Elements of Accounts, Rittenhouse, — McGraw-Hill Book Co. 

Trigonometry, Bocher and Gaylord, — Henry Holt & Co. 

Four Place Logarithmic Tables, E. V. Huntington, — Harvard Co- 
operative Society. 

Constructive Dictation, Edward H. Gardiner, — Gregg Publishing 
Co. 

Garnet de Campagne d'un Officer Francais — Benjamin H. San- 
born & Co. 

Sous Les Armes, — Henry Holt & Co. 

Scenes of Familiar Life — D. C. Heath & Co. 

La France Heroique — D. C. Heath & Co. 

Blanchaud's Progressive French Idioms, — D. C. Heath & Co. 

Histoire de France, Lavisse, — D. C. Heath & Co. 

La Familia de Alvareda, Caballero — Henry Holt & Company. 

Industry and Trade, Bishop & Keller — Ginn & Company. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 150 



For Ju<nior High and Elementary Schools. 
As Text-Books. 

Elementary Spanish Reader — Ginn & Company. 

The Young American Readers — John C. Winston Company. 

The Winston Readers — John C. Winston Company. 

Stories of Americans in the World War — Journal of Education. 

My Country — Ginn & Company. 

Lest We Forget — ^Silver, Burdett & Company. 

Our Community — John C. Winston Company. 

Around the World With the Children — ^American Book Company. 

Essentials of Arithmetic Series, Wentworth-Smith — Ginn & Com- 
pany. 

Hamilton's Standard Arithmetic Series — American Book Company. 

Everyday Arithmetic Series — Hoyt and Peet — Houghton, Mifflin 
Company. 

Aldine Supplementary Readers. 

As Reference Books. 

The Little Book of the War, Tappan — Houghton, Mifflin Company. 

The Liberty Reader, Sheridan — B. H. Sanborn & Company. 

A School History of the Great War, McKinley, Coulomb, and 

Gerson — American Book Company. 
War Readings — Charles iScribner's Sons. 
. Arlo, Cobb — Riverdale Press. 
Clematis, Cobb — Riverdale Press. 
Fifty-five Community Songs, — C. C. Birchard Co. 



For Junior High Schools. 

As Reference Books. 

Walsh's Business Arithmetic, John Henry Walsh, — Gregg Publish- 
ing Co. 

Elementary American History, Woodburn and Moran, — Longmans, 
Green & Co. 

Spirit of Democracy, Powell, — Rand McNally Co. 



160 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 26.— HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION. 

The graduation exercises of the High School occurred on Thursday, 
June 26, 1919. 

ORDER OF EXERCISES. 

HERBERT CHOLERTON, Chairman of the School 
Committee, Presiding. 

I. OVERTURE — "Light Cavalry" Suppe 

High School Orchestra, Ralph Baxter, Leader. 

2. PRAYER — Rev. Robert A. Colpitts. 

Pastor of the First Methodist Episcopal Church. 

3. SINGING — "Hail to the Heroes" Verdi 

Graduating Class. 

4. ESSAY — "Ye Are the Hope of the World" 

Lillian M. Trask. 

5. SOLO — "Morning" Speaks 

Ruth L. Caulfield. 

6. ESSAY — "The Stranger Within Our Gates" 

Charles L. S. Easton. 

7. SINGING — "Shout Aloud In Triumph" Manney 

Graduating Class. 

8. ADDRESS TO GRADUATES 

Thomas H. Dowd, LL. D., Judge of the Municipal Court of the 

City of Boston. 

9. SINGING — "Hallelujah," from "Messiah" Handel 

Graduating Class. 

10. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS TO GIRLS 

Daniel H. Bradley, Vice-Chairman, School Committee. 

II. MARCH — "Soldiers of the Air" Fulton 

Orchestra 

12. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS TO BOYS 

Dr. Herbert Cholerton, Chairman, School Committee. 

13. SINGING — "The Star Spangled Banner" 

14. POSTLUDE— "Lion Tamer" Sousa 

Orchestra 

Singing and orchestra under the direction of James P. McVey, Super- 
visor of Music in the Public Schools. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



161 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 

June, 1919. 
* Graduated with Honor, 



Aberle, Rosa Jeannette 
Adams, Ruth Olive 
Ahern, Mary Angela 
Ahlner, Clara Sophia 
Andersen, Florence C. J. 
Arata, Rose Catherine 
Atkins, Naomi 
Bacon, Ethel Augusta 
Baker, Lottie 
Barker, Gertrude Frances 
Barnes, Grace 
Barry, Mary Josephine 
Bassnett, Grace Annabelle 
Bell, Emily Amelia 
Benjamin, Helen Leah 
Bennett, Jessie Emilie 
Berman, May Charlotte 
Biller, Frances Ethel 
Blackman, Alberta Mabelle 
Bloomer, Velma Marion 
Bormann, Helen Gertrude 
*Briggs, Ethel May 
Bryant, Edna May 
Buchanan, Phoebe Marion 
Buckley, Alice Agatha 
Bump, Thelma Merian 
♦Burke, Dorothy May 
Burke, Grace Thelma 
Burnett, Juniata 
Campbell, Doris May 
Campbell, Grace Jane 
Campbell, Helen Margaret 
Campbell, Mary Helen 
Canavan, Edith Marguerite 
Cannon, Thelma Elizabeth 
Casey, Irene Virginia 
Caswell, Gladys Elizabeth 
Caulfield, Ruth Lee 
Chequer, Ruth Elizabeth 
Chick, Frances Mary 
Clapp, Dorothy Helene 
Clark, Isabel Bates 
Clarke, Grace Mary 
♦Codding, Mildred Brown 
Coffey, Ethel Marie 
♦Colpitts, Leota Carolene 
Cook, Mildred 
Cook, Miriam Louise 
Currie, Helen Tremaine 
Davis, Dorothy 



Decker, Elizabeth Howard 
Donahue, Anna Gertrude 
Dow, Marian Louise 
Drew, Marjorie Virginia 
Drew, Mary Elizabeth 
Driscoll, Elizabeth Hurley 
Edwards, Lillian Evadell 
Ellis, Luthera Abbie 
*Estee, Helen Catherine 
Fallgren, Martha Torborg 
Ferguson, Edna Gertrude 
Ferguson, Gladys 
Fielder, Edith Elizabeth 
*Fine, Mollie 
Fiske, Rachel Minot 
Flynn, Alice Frances 
Fowler, Marion Laura 
Fowler, Marion Saloma 
♦Freeman, Katharine Grace 
Freeto, Carrie May 
Fudge, Marion Elizabeth 
Gaddis, Agnes Blanche 
Garside, Lillian Mae 
Gavin, Marie Bernadine 
Gilmore, Virginia 
Givan, Melda Spratt 
Gould, Mildred May 
Gratcyk, Berna^ette Octavia 
Gray, Florence Gladys 
Groombridge, Ruth Alicia 
Gutosky, Adele 
Hale, Lillian Malcolm 
Hall, Anna Ethelyne 
Hanna, Ruth Isabel 
Harding, Edith Frances 
♦Harding, Helen Louise 
♦Harriman, Ruth 
Harrington, Frances Ellen 
Harrington, Mary Blanche 
Heap, Vera Constance 
Hearn, Gladys Marjorie 
Henehan, Winifred Anna 
Hession, Alice Louise 
Higgins, Emily Fairwin 
♦Hinkley, Helen Agnes 
♦Hodgkins, Marion Emery 
Hofmann, Blanche Louisa 
Hogan, Mary Gertrude Louise 
♦Holloway, Rosina Dorothy 
Horrell, Eleanor May 



162 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Hunter, Henrietta Vivian 
Keddy, Doris Estelle 
Keenan, Dorothy Elizabeth 
Kelleher, Margaret Mae 
Kelley, Madeleine Elsie 
Kennedy, Edith Lydia 
Kerner, Sylvia 
Kilcoyne, Helen Aldegone 
Leavitt, Hazel Linwood 
Legg, Mary Elizabeth 
Leith, Dorothy Eveline 
Linehan, Margaret Teresa 
Linnehan, Margaret Elizabeth 
Loring, Dorothy 
Lothrope, Hazel Madeline 
Lynch, Julia Eleanor 
Lyons, Alice Josephine 
MacDonald, Margaret Jane 
MacKay, Dorothy Cameron 
MacMaster, Charlotte Augusta 

*Magwood, Mae Agnes 
Malaney, Eunice Mary 
Manthorne, Josephine A. E. 
Marshall, Marion Eugenia 
Martin, Adele 

*May, Helen Louise 
McCrillis, Mary 
McHale, Ellen Beatrice 
McLaughlin, Eleanor Louise 
McMahon, Mary Eleanor 
McNamara, Eleanor Mary 
Miller, Gertrude Evelyn 
Mills, Alice Edna 
Mitchell, Beatrice Cora 
Mitrano, Anna 
Mooney, Evelyn Frances 
Moore, Emma Prances 
Moore, Jessie Elizabeth 
Murphy, Josephine Catherine 
Murray, Frances Eleanore 
Nemser, Pauline Leah 
Norton, Sadie Agatha 
Nowell, Beulah Jane 

*Ohse, Hildegarde 
Okey, Dorothy Duff King 
Parker, Florence Hall 
Peak, Alice Gorham 
Pearlman, Rhoda 
Pedrazzi, Mary Therese 
Perry, Barbara Louise 
Phelps, Christine Harriet 
Quail, Olivia May 
Quinn, Elizabeth Emma 

♦Rafuse, Verna Sarty 
Reynolds, Gladys Alma 
Ryan, Mary Cecelia 
Sainato, Marguerite Marion 
Sargent, Bertha Estelle 
Sawyer, Dorothy Hortense 



Scholes, Leah Pearl 
Scribner, Mildred Elizabeth 
Seller, Thelma Beatrice 
Shaw, Constance Evangeline 
Siegel, Sophie Helen 
Smith, Ruth Edwina 
Smith, Violet Marian 
Spinney, Gladys Elizabeth 
Springer, Eleanor Gertrude 
Steeves, Florence Anna 
Stockbridge, Evelyn Field 
Sullivan, Alice Marguerite 
Sullivan, Mary Loretta 
Sullivan, Mildred Blanche 

*Sweet, Helen 
Swinehamer. Ethel May 
Tapley, Phyllis Verne 

♦Taylor, Doris Hale 
Thorne, Dorothy Lelia 

*Trask, Lillian Margaret 
Traver, Muriel Audrey 
Trefry, Dorothy Julia 
Trimble, Alice Gertrude 
Trueman, Dorothy 
Tutein, Grace 
Walsh, Joan Frances 

*Warren, Sarah Leone 

*Watt, Bernice Leavitt 
Webber, Irene Gwendoline 
Wellman, Dorothy Mary 
Westlin, Valborg Mathilda 
Weston, Ella 
Wetzler, Ida Ellen 
Whalen, Madeline Margaret 
White, Mabel Florence 
Wilber, Dorothy 
Wilder, Doris 

♦Wilson, Bertha Washington 

♦Wolf, Hazel Florence 
Wolfe, Sarah Louise 
Woods, Ethel Louise 
Wyse, Alice Ethel 

♦Yavner, Pearl Pauline 
Allen, Edward Victor 

♦Avery, John 
Ayer, John William 
Baker, Edward Wesley 
Baldwin, William Edward 
Baxter, Ralph Frederick 
Bent, Samuel Augustus 
Biagiotti, Ralph Matthew 
Bickford, Theodore Reginald 
Blumsack, Maurice William 
Brown, Ernest Elliot 

♦Calkin, Frank George 
Carey, John William 
Carvill, Arthur Lincoln 
Celata, Umberto 
Chaffee, Randolph Warren 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



163 



*Chandler, Myron Kennard 
♦Chapman, Dwight Ingersoll 
*Cirella, Lawrence Efttore 

Clark, Earl Spickett 

Coaker, George Watson 

Cohen, Hona 

Cohen, Melvin Joseph 

Cook, Edward Williston 

Copithome, William Lumb 

Cox, George Henry 

Coyne, Harold Vincent 

Cudmore, James Aloysious 

Desmond, Joseph Leo 

Devine, George Arthur 

Doctoroff, Louis 

Downey, William Edward 

Downing, James Anthony 

Dyson, Albert 

Eames, Frederick Weston 
*Easton, Charles Lawren Stevens 

Eddy, Norman Leopold 

Ells, Wilfred Scott 

Estey, Roger Bradshaw 

Fitzpatrick, Joseph Benedict 

Foley, Edward Joseph 

Frazee, Kenneth Ainslie 

Fuller, Everett Malcolm 

Geran, Edward John 

Greene, John Francis 

Harris, George Edwin 

Hayes, Robert Irving 

Hayes, William Franklin 

Hockenson, Oscar Randolph 

Holmes, Albert Joseph 

Howland, Francis Nickerson 

Jaques, George Henry 

Judge, John Joseph 

Keegan, George Edward 

Kendall, Charles Cobb Henry 

Kingston, Allan Roy 

Knox, Joseph Carleton 

Kolb, Charles Roy 

Lazzaro, John Baptist 

Lundgren, James Ellsworth 

Lyle, Edgar Reginald 

MacKenzie, Channing Hazeltine 



Markle, Paul Belling 
Meaney, David Joseph 
*Mongan, Charles Edward, Jr. 

* Moore, Dudley 

Moore, Ephraim William 

Morrison, Edward John Weldon 

Mulholland, George Henry 

Murphy, Walter Francis 

Murrell, Lester Bumham 

Myers, Earl Seymour 

Noyes, Harold Merrill 

O'Donoghue, Edward Henry 

O'Hare, Thomas Joseph 

Paasche, Norman Justin 

Pearlman, Harry 

Perron, Elmer Lewis 

Plummer, Thomas Elliott 

Powell, Edwin Scott 
*Price, Harold Fifield 

Price, Samuel 

Reed, Lucius Kendall 
*Root, Winthrop Hegeman 

Rourke, Arthur John 

Russell, Lawrence Francis 

Ryan, James Daniel 

Ryan, Lawrence Francis 

Scigliano, Frank Pietro 
*Sharkey, Edward Joseph 

Silva, Raymond Mason 

Simpson, Fred Nelson 

Sisk, George Joseph 

Sliriey, Joseph Leo 

* Smith, Lloyd Edwin 
Spaulding, Edward Brown 
Stephens, Melvin Adams 
Stynes, James Francis 
Taylor, Robert Kenneth 
Thurston, Harold Alexander • 
Treat, Charles Herbert 
Turner, Frank William 
Walker, Francis Clayton 
Walsh, Elmer Frederick 
Walton, Alfred Clifton 
Watkins, George Arthur 
Whitney, Steams Hay 
Wood, Morris Barnes 



Total Number of Graduates, 310. Boys, 108; Girls, 202. 

Junior High School graduations occurred in the school 
buildings on June 25, 1919. 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 
Eastern. 



Allen, Maude Netina 
Beeman, Eva Aurelia 
Biagiotti, Mary Julia 
Bishop, Arthur Joseph 



Blanchard, Gordon Arnold 
Bliss, Clinton F. 
Blish, Louise Caroline 
Bradshaw, Mildred Louise 



164 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Brawn, Grant A. 
Brennan, Ethel Catherine 
Brine, Ethel Charlotte 
Burleigh, Mildred Esther 
Burns, Margaret 
Burton, Gladys Marie 
Cameron, Doris 
Cardalino, Anthony 
Catsiff, Oscar 
Clark, Frank R. 
Coleman, Margaret 
Cotter, Mary Elizabeth 
Crosby, Dorothy 
Cuneo, Leila Alice 
Daley, George Henry 
Davidson, Charles James 
Dempsey, John 
Di Cecca, John 
Dixon, Harold Robert 
Doheney, Mary 
Donovan, Charles 
Downey, Francis 
Duffey, Rosamond L. 
Dunlap, Alice Wentworth 
Durgin, Ellen Inez 
Durning, Edna Frances 
Ellison, Sarah 
Engelhardt, Grace 
Fidalgo, Edward P. 
Fisher, Marie Kathleen 
Flanagan, Maude W. 
Flynn, Annie 
Fowler, Ernest S. 
Galvin, Thomas F. 
Gostanian, Gostan 
Giles, Lillian Marie 
Goldstein, Israel 
Grattan, Honora Marie 
Greenberg, Jennie 
Harding, Elvin Richard 
Hale, Muriel Gladys 
Hallett, Ruth Chapman 
Heffernan, William Phelan 
Hockheim, Christine Fix 
Hunter, Inez Blaisdell 
Johnson, Vano J. 
Kennard, Wentworth 
Kerner, Lillian 
Knox, Elsie Lovering 
Knox, Maynard Parkman 
Kurth, Ruth 
Laighton, Lillian A. 
Lebovich, Hannah 
Lewis, Frederick 
Linehan, Ellen Margaret 



Lohman, Emily A. 
Longfellow, Gladys May 
Lyon, Mary T. 
MacLellan, Earl Robert 
Malone, Rosemary 
Manning, Joseph 
Martin, Willard Edgar, Jr. 
Martin, Wiuthrop Reynolds 
Mayall, Mary Evelyne 
McAuley, Mary A. 
McConnell, Dorothy Beryl 
McGlinchy, Gertrude Louise 
McLain, Mary Alecta 
Milano, Mary H. E. 
Minzner, Myrtle Irene 
Mitchell, Helen Elizabeth 
Moore, Hazel Mae 
Mullin, Margaret 
Murley, Ralph William 
Murphy, Rose Anna 
Nugent, Roy 
O'Brien, Mary 
O'Leary, Harold C. 
Pen Dell, Josephine 
Perry, Madeline 
Powers, Margaret 
Powers, William 
Publicover, Nellie Elizabeth 
Quinlan, Weldon Harley 
Reardon, Annie 
Reegan, Ethel R. 
Reid, Robert Lawrence 
Robbins, Ralph Herbert 
Robinson, J. Curtis 
Roche, James Edward 
Rodgers, Hazel May 
Ross, Helen P. 
Ross, Kenneth Webster 
Ryan, Margaret Honora 
Schwartz, Louis 
Schwartz, Samuel 
Schutte, Agnes Lyell 
Shea, Kathleen 
Silva, Mary 
Smith, Louis Hart 
Spies, Frederick W. 
Thomas, John Walter 
Tick, Samuel 
Upton, Olive Mitchell 
Weinberger, Ruth 
Whitney, Francis Scott 
Wright, Clayton B. 
Yavner, Mary 
Young, Doris Rose 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



165 



Northern. 



Abells, Harry E. 
Abells, Lois Augusta 
Allen, Bernard 
Anderson, Freida Louise 
Andefson, Ruth Evelyn 
Aronson, Leo 
Babineau, Edith S. 
Barnes, William Albert 
Basset, Dorothy 
Bellizia, Florence J. 
Blake, Alice L. 
Bloomstein, Meyrick 
Breen, Leonard Chandler 
Brown, Edwin Leslie 
Buchinsky, Edward 
Burckes, Chandler Harding 
Burrows, Katherine E. 
Buttimer, Gerald F. 
Cannon, Marion A. 
Clark, Barbara Lydia 
Clark, Florence Louise 
Coffey, James J. 
Collins, Ellen E. 
Fitzgerald, Katherine M. 
Conrad, Dorothy M. 
Corcoran, Esther M. 
Cowan, Dorothy Helen 
Coyle, Theodore Russell 
Crescio, Jennie Rita 
Crocker, Ernest M. 
Cronin, Catherine Ellen 
Crowley, Mary E. 
Dexter, Edythe D. 
Doll, Helen F. 
Earle, Alvin Lloyd 
Edgerly, Carl Frank 
Edgerly, Edna M. 
Herman, Albert A. 
Falvey, Edward Albert 
Fannon, Joseph Lawrence 
Filadoro, Michael A. 
Filippone, Frances A. 
Finlay, Eleanor R. 
Finnegan, L. E. Alton 
Fisher, Sanford 
French, Gladys 
Fuccione, Silvio John 
Galvin, Alice Josephine ' 
Geary, Daniel Joseph, Jr. 
Glazier, Dorothy Stockwell 
Goff, Marion W. 
Goodfellow, William A. 
Graef, Donald Androus 
Greene, Adelaide 
Grills, Grace Winifred 
Hardin, Foster G. 
Holahan, Margaret V. 



Hubert, Florence Marie 

Hunnewell, Mildred Viola C. 

Jacome, Wilhemina M. 

Jillson^ Harold Herman 

Kane, Isabelle M. 

Kelter, Ruth A. 

Kinney, Adelaide W. 

Kinsman, Roy Frederick 

Knibbs, Charles Cornelius 

Lee, Grace D. 

Libby, Sara M. 

Lombard, Alice Gertrude 

Lynn, Anna E. 

MacLaren, George P. 

MacKenzie, Laura Ruth 

MacLellan, Josephine Elizabeth 

MacNeil, Angus Michael 

Magoon, Eleanor S. 

Malvey, Mary L. 

Manthorne, W. D. Lockhart 

Marquedant, Francis L 

Martin, Helen Winifred 

Matheson, Norman Albert 

McCarthy, Edith Marie 

McKelvey, Robert E. 

Moccia, Annie Marie 

Moccia, John Joseph 

Moore, Eleanor M. 

Morrill, Adelbert E. 

Mumford, Francis Estey 

Murphy, Mary Gertrude 

Nevins, Ina Genevieve 

Northrop, Ralph W. 

Notaro, Elvira F. 

Novack, George M. 

O'Connell, James A. 

O'Keefe, John Francis 

Parker, Lloyd R. 

Peakes, Esther Louise 

Perry, Lila Gladys 

Powers, Frederick Leo 

Price, Helen Melba 

Priebe, Adelaide P. 

Robie, Olive Jane 

Rooks, Roger F. 

RufRno, Josephine Adelina 

Sandberg, Elsie L. 

Scully, Joseph Arthur 

Shapiro, Alexander Z. 

Shute, Frances J. 

Sileno, Louis 

Small, Edith Hazel 

Smith, Bella Mary 

Smith, Catherine M. 

Spear, Edwin Warren 

Steeves, Lula T. 

Tanner, Allyne Frances 



166 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Tarpey, Thomas Joseph 
Tochtermann, J. Herbert 
Tonneson, Elmer Everett 
Trowbridge, Aldus Stone 
Twombly, Gertrude L. 
Underbill, Jesse Johnson 
Wattie, Alice 



Weagle, Fred L. 
Whalen, Annie Agnes 
Wilkins, Austin E. 
Williams, Gladys Edna 
Youlden, Eleanor M, 
Young, Florence Elizabeth 
Zorolow, Mary 



Southern. 



Armstrong, Bessie M. 
Babcock, Adelbert 
Backer, Samuel 
Backus, Aileen Elizabeth 
Bannister, Leo William 
Barrett, Joseph Francis 
Bertelli, Ada Maria 
Bertucci, Rena E. 
Bianchino, Alexander A. 
Blacker, Frederick J. 
Borges, Irene Evelyn 
Boyd, Maxwell Delmore 
Brennan, Joseph Thomas 
Bresnahan, Elizabeth Cecelia 
Burke, Clarence A. 
Burke, Esther 
Caless, Jesse A. 
Calzolari, Ada Anna 
Catanzano, Frances 
Chase, Kenneth William 
Chequer, Henry, Jr. 
Cipriano, George 
Clark, Marian Jobson 
Cole, James Joseph 
Conwell, Charles Brewster 
Courtney, Katherine Marie 
Cremen, Edmund M. 
Crispo, Marie I. 
Crocket, Elizabeth A. 
Cronin, Teresa Loretta 
Crotty, William Joseph 
Crowell, Ethel B. 
Dagnino, Julia Rena 
Dempsey, William P. 
Deroo, Walter C. 
DeRosa, Ralph 
Dick, Gladys Edna 
Dinelli, Enes R. 
Dirlam, Arland Augustus 
Dodge, William Franklin 
Dolan, Helen Nora 
Dole, Frank Sidney 
Donovan, Mary Agnes 
Doyle, M. Louise 
Dunleavy, Margaret L. 
Eddy, Eva Maverette 
Edgar, Doris Marjory 



Erb, Marion Gladys 
Ernst, Alice E. 
Fantelli, John Leo 
Farrell, George A. 
Farrell, Mary 
Feeney, Andrew C. 
Fermoyle, Leo Joseph 
Fish, Beatrice Munroe 
Flanagan, Loretto Anita 
Flinn, Lillian F. 
Franzosa, Antoinette 
Frazee, Olive Whitney 
Fuller, Douglas B. 
Galley, Huldah B. 
Gannon, Richard 
Garrity, Ruth Elinor 
Gaspar, Margaret Jean 
Gauthier, Celia B, 
Gosse, Edward L. 
Gray, Alice Mildred 
Gray, June A. 
Haley, Francis J. 
Hamilton, Helen Elizabeth 
Harer, Josephine Louise 
Hunter, Henrietta 
Hurley, Harry N. 
Johnson, Sara V. 
Johnstone, Jessie M. 
Kaitz, Maurice 
Kaplan, Sophie E. 
Kavooghian, Victoria A. 
Keane, James Henry 
Keefe, Helen Louise 
Kennedy, Dorothy Carolyn 
Lane, Helen A. 
Lemos, Anthony P. 
Leyden, John F. 
Litwin, Sanford 
Long, Myrtle M. 
Luurtsema, George W. 
MacFadyen, Florence Olive 
MaoFadyen, Lois Evedyn 
MacLachlan, Annie T. 
Mahoney, Elizabeth Rita 
Mahony, Julia Veronica 
Main, Ruth J. 
Maloney, John Francis 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



167 



McCann, Mary Agnes 
McCarthy, Anna Elizabeth 
McCarthy, Paul Leonard 
McFarland, Henry Joseph 
McGlone, Joseph Thomas 
McMahon, Josephine Marie 
Marble, Lawrence Clifton 
Martin, Edward A. 
Martin, Howard A. 
Martin, James E. 
Mazzuckelli, Flora Rita 
Meyer, Alice Sanborn 
Milne, Edna Mary 
Moody, S. Esther 
Motherway, Catherine M. 
Motherway, Mary T. R. 
Murphy, Frances M. 

Murphy, John C. 

Murray, Phyllis Agatha 

Myerson, Samuel 

Naiman, Anna G. 

Needel, Sadie B. 

Nesbitt, Mary Ewing 

O'Connell, Daniel Joseph 

O'Connor, John J. 

O'Loughlin, Helen G. 

O'Neill, James Vincent 

Orrell, Grace Lillian 

Owens, Joseph L. 

Phillips, Dexter C. 

Pirani, William 

Pollock, Herbert Everett 

Pomphret, Margaret Mary 

Pretty, Marion L. 

Price, John Harold 

Quigley, James William 



Quinn, Annie Agnes 

Ralston, Hazel Mae 

Reidy, John G. 

Ring, Mary E. 

Roberts, Morris 

Rodwell, Helen Frances 

Rouffa, Jennette 

Rowell, Parker C. 

Sampson, Catherine E. 

Sandberg, Elsa Mildred 

Seifen, Arthur Francis 

Serson, James Charles 

Shea, Robert F. 

Simmons, Frederick Burge 

Singleton, Charles Milton 

Sliney, John E. 

Smith, Richard M. 

Smithers, Winifred M. 

Spencer, Georgiana 
Sullivan, Daniel Francis 
Tashjian, Martin H. 
Torri, Mary Frances P. 
Trask, Marjorie Mae 
Venot, Wilhelmina L. 
Walsh, Mary Charlotte 
Waters, Catherine Winnifred 
Watson, Harold Clayton 
Westlund, Doris H. 
Whyte, Chester G. 
Wilson, Ernest Herbert 
Wilson, Richard Trenholm 
Witham, Lillian E. F. 
Wombolt, George 
Works, Melvin Ford 
Younker, Madeline M. 



Western. 



Ahern, Isabel J. 
Albano, Josephine A. 
Albertini. Paul Flanders 
Aldrich, Willard Carl 
Alexander, Wallace B. 
Amyrald, Ross H. 
Anderson, Thelma Marie 
Baker, Doris 
Baker, Iva R. 
Barden, M. Carmelita 
Beaver, Mary A. 
Bennett, Charles M. 
Benson, Walter H. 
Bettencourt, Joseph M. 
Blake, Florence Alfreda 
Blood, Harry K. 
Boyce, Gladys M. 
Brooks, Arthur Forrest 
Brooks, John A. 
Boyd, Alfred Alonzo 



Brown, Doris Isabell 
Bullard, Isaiah 
Campbell, Charles A. 
Carlson, Alice V. 
Carlson, Clarence W. 
Carlson, C. Henry 
Carlson, Gladys 
Casassa, Ada J. 
Casassa, S. Mary 
Chapin, Marion L. 
Chapin, Theodore C. 
Clark, Frances 
Cox, John E. 
Cross, Irving E. 
Crowe, Florence Edna 
Cunningham, Helen 
Currier, Marjorie F. 
Custer, William Clarke 
Daggett, Lawrence L. 
Danforth, Horace A. 



168 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Delaney, Edwin L. 
Dempsey, Frances E. 
Devlin, Josephine M. 
Dingwell, Irene Elizabeth 
Donovan, Robert F. 
Downs, Blanche Eldridge 
Drew, Dorothy Elizabeth' 
Dunn, Gwendolyn H. M. 
Dunning, Marion G. 
Dwyer, Edward J. 
Earl, Edwin 
Edwards, Helen 
Ellis, Walter C. 
Emery, Edith 
Englund, Doris Louise 
Farnum, George Wesley 
Fermoyle, Laurena M. 
Field, Janet A. 
Fisher, Dorothy M. 
Fleming, Raphael J. 
Fontana, Prank 
Fontana, Mary E. 
Forbes, Albert Gardner 
Ford, Sumner Maxwell 
Frazier, Kenneth Chabot 
Freeze, Rhona M. 
Garland, Chester P. 
Geer, Eleanor P. 
Girard, Arline 
Goduti, Elda 
Gordon, Dorothy 
Gore, Marion E. 
Gorrill, Frances L. 
Graham, Hugh Haliday 
Grinnell, Donald Curtis 
Grout, Helen Frances 
Grush, Russell Benjamin 
Guinasso, George F. 
Hakesley, Edward R. 
Haskell, Raymond A. 
Hassett, John W. 
Hathaway, William Taber 
Heald, Paula Dorothy 
Hesse, Marian Juliet 
Higgins, Lincoln C. 
Hodgkins, Alice Mary 
Hopkins, Stephen Joseph 
Jackson, John Philip 
Jillette, Arthur G. 
Johnson, Genevieve E. 
Jordon, Earle Channing 
Jordon, Thelma L. 
Jordon, Viola Frances 
Keddy, Roma Blanche 
Kelson, Florence L 
Kennedy, Grace Edith 
Kilcoyne, Florence Louise 
LeDuke, Eleanor Huntress 
Leslie, Eli Hillson 



Lewis, Helen C. 
Lindberg, Edward R. 
Lofgren, Edith R. 
Lynd, Alice 
Macphail, Ethel J. 
MacPhee, Mildred 
Marshall, Helen Catherine 
Marshall, Pauline W. 
Marvin, Lydia C. 
McCobb, Edna K. 
McKinnon, Muriel Marie 
Mekkelsen, Maurice N. 
Miller, Annie Frances 
Montuori, Angelo 
Moore, Edith Constance 
Moore, Edith Louise 
Morse, David W. 
Murrell, Franklin H. 
Nagle, Margaret A. 
Nichol, Mary Scott 
Nilson, Irene Caroline 
O'Brien, Maurice Joseph 
O'Hayre, John J. 
Osborn, Florence G. 
Owens, George E. 
Packard, Dorothy G. 
Pappas, John C. 
Pappas, Mary C. 
Parker, Marjorie Weston 
Paulson, Rudolph B. 
Peak, Genevieve Howard 
Pearson, Hilding Richard 
Peters, Leslie Joseph 
Peterson, Gladys R. 
Peterson, Philip L, 
Phillips, Marion Arline 
Phillips, Leonard H. 
Pickard, Dorothy K. 
Pigott, Florence Jessie 
Pitts, Clifford Francis 
Plummer, Inez V. 
Powell, Agnes Mildred 
Pride, Alice W. 
Putnam, Roy F. 
Quarnstrom, Ralph H. 
Reavis, Richard P. 
Record, Phoebe H. 
Reed, Milton J. 
Ricker, Ethel Rosamond 
Riess, Warren A. 
Riley, Doris J. 
Robinson, Marjorie L. 
Ross, Blanche M. 
Ryan, Margaret 
Scott, Esther D. 
Simpson, M, Lincoln 
Smith, Gladys I. 
Smith, Herbert Pratt 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



169 



Stark, Mabel C. 
Stern, Evelyn G. 
Stevens, Robert Nichols 
Stodder, Williston F. 
Symonds, Frances Elizabeth 
Sylvester, Robert W. 
Tarbell, Charles Stuart 
Thompson, Arline Annie 
Thyne, Mary E. 
Ticehurst, Alvin R. 
Timpe, Rudolph G. 
Tinker, Foster M. 
Tobin, Helen Barbara 
Todd, Marion Evelyn 
Tottle, Kenneth Peter 
Truesdale, Ruth Greenwell 
Twitchell, Virginia E. 



Walker, Edna M. 
Walker, Ethel Gladys 
White, Vida C. 
Whitman, Vera H. 
Whitten, George J. 
Wickerson, Stuart A. 
Wilbur, Florence 
Wilde, Franklin 
Wilkins, Florence Evelyn 
Wilkins, Malcolm C. 
Wilson, Kenneth L 
Williams, Daniel Francis 
Young, Christine A. 
Young, Florence Ednah 
Yacubian, Levon M. 
Zwicker, Kathleen V. 



LIST OF HIGH SCHOOL NINTH GRADE PUPILS PROMOTED TO 
THE TENTH GRADE JUNE, 1919. 



Aikins, Hilda M. 
Allen, E. Jean 
Allen, Hesper J. 
Andelman, Bertha 
Andersen, Mary C. 
Andrews, Lillian 
Ashton, Elizabeth C. 
Barnes, Gertrude Rita 
Barrett, Beatrice A. 
Barton, Goldie 
Beedle, Eleanor 
Berman, Angelina 
Berman, Bessie A. 
Berra, Mary A. 
Bertelsen, Elsie 
Bingham, Beatrice H. 
Birchdale, Irene A. 
Boggs, Adelaide 
Brannen, Norma D. 
Bratton, Helen 
Briggs, Gladys M. 
Brine, Helen G. 
Bronstein, Ida 
Brown, Mary B. 
Buckley, Olive A. 
Burns, Helen C. 
Burton, Hazel M. 
Calderoni, Isabelle B. 
Callahan, Irene M. 
Carlson, Ruth L. 
Carlson, Viola E. 
Carpenter, Mildred 
Casey, Eleanor B. 
Casey, Evelyn M. 
Casey, Jennie M. 



Clouther, Veneta M. 
Coakley, Ruth E. 
Colcord, Charlotte A. 
Collins, Ruth A. 
Conley, Elizabeth M. 
Connolly, Marguerite 
Connor, Bertha M. 
Connors, Lauretta A. 
Cooper, Elizabeth 
Cox, Irene M. 
Coyne, Catherine G. 
Crosby, Jeannette C. 
Crosby, Paula Q. 
Cutler, Mable E. 
Cutler, Ruth A. 
Damery, Marie B. 
Davis, E. Natalie 
Day, Emily A. 
Dearborn, Mildred V. 
Dearborn, Olivia M. 
Delaney, Doris M. 
DeMita, Mary B. 
Desmond, H. Ruth 
Desmond, Mary A. 
DeWitt, Marion L. 
Dillman, Ida F. 
Dodge, Marian L. 
Doherty, Julia A. 
Donahue, Margaret A. 
Donovan, Helen T. 
Douglas, Catherine W. 
Downing, Alice M. 
Doyle, Jennie A. 
Drew, Ruth M. 
Drowns, Dorothy O. 



170 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Duffy, Marguerite 
Dunne, Ethel L. 
Dutton, Gladys E. 
Dyas, Ruth 
Edwardes, Aurora S. 
Estabrook, Elsie L. 
Farrell, Carita M. 
Farrington, Irma C. 
Ferguson, Doris M. 
Fishlin, Eva 
Fogarty, Grace F. 
Foley, F. Ethel 
Freeman, Laura M. 
French, Mildred E. 
Fuller, Grace H. 
Gallagher, Anna L. 
Garey, Ruth G. 
Garland, Helen I. 
Gassett, Ina M. 
Getchell, Helen M. 
Gethin, Martha L. 
Gibson, Lois P. 
Gilman, Annie 
Gilmore, Hazel D. 
Giragosian, Zabelle K. 
Goguen, Florence M. 
Gordon, Dorothy 
Gould, Lillian E. 
Grant, Orrie B. 
Grue, Anna G. 
Guelfi, Renetta A. 
Hailwood, Natalie C. 
Haley, Catherine T. 
Hall, Bernice A. 
Hampton, Marie L. 
Hanna, Florence G. 
Harmon, Edith M. 
Haskell, Priscilla G. 
Hasselgren, Lillian 
Hatch, Dorothy M. 
Hatch, Lola 
Hatchett, Helen G. 
Havican, Nora L. 
Hayden, Ida M. 
Hayden, Sarah A. 
Henderson, Dorothy M. 
Herlihy, Mary 
Hickey, Alice A. 
Hill, Lillian M. 
Holbrook, Janette A. 
Holland, Mary E. 
Holman, Bernice G. 
Holmes, Olive E. 
Holyoke, Florence B. 
Hoole, Helen G. 
Home, Agnes 
Howard, Helen J. 
Howard, Marjorie E. 
Hubbard, Arline G. 



Huey, Winifred M. 
Hunter, Doris V. 
Hurd, Bertha M. 
Hurwitz, Ruth M. 
Irving, Edna M. 
Irwin, Doris M. 
Ivaska, Mildred J. 
Jaques, Lillian F. 
Jillette, Flora B. 
Johansen, Victoria A. 
Johnson, Florence H. 
Johnson, Irene E. 
Johnson, Marion E. 
Johnson, Ruth M. 
Johnson, Viola M. 
Jones, Dorothy A. 
Jones, Edith H. 
Jones, Olive L. 
Jones, Thelma A, 
Kamemori, Haru A. 
Keating, Anna E. 
Keefe, Helen M. 
Keith, Mildred W. 
Kelleher, Catherine C. 
Kelliher, Mary H. 
Kelly, Josephine A. 
Kenney, Marie E. 
Kenney, Marie P. 
King, Mary C. 
Kopf, Dorothea W. 
Laird, Marion E. 
Lally, Rita D. 
Lamborghini, Angelina 
Larson, Edith E. 
Leavitt, Ethel J. 
Leavitt, Ruth E. 
Lewis, Bertha M. 
Lewis, Mary L. 
Linardy, Margaret M. 
Lincoln, Helena R, 
Linderholm, Helen L. 
Linfield, Marion P. 
Lipkind, Rose D. 
Long, Katharine F. 
Luurtsema, Josephine G. 
Lyons, Bessie C. 
Lyons, Marion L. 
Lyons, Mary M. 
MacDonald, Dorothy A. 
MacKay, Allaire 
MacKay, Nellie M. 
MacKenzie, Katherine 
MacKillop, Mary E. 
MacLaughlin, Hazel R. 
Magnusson, Anna M. 
Malloy, Cecelia F. 
Manley, Bernice A. 
Manning, Helen P. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



171 



Mannion, Grace E7. 
Mara, Agatha L. 
Martin, Elinor P. 
Mason, Helen V. 
Mauch, Ida D. 
McCabe, Kathleen C. 
McCarthy, Catherine R. 
McCloud, Myrtle M. 
McDermott, Helen E. 
McDonald, Marjorie 
McDowell, Jessie A. 
McGoldrick, Florence E. 
McGoldrick, Margaret R. 
McGrath, Alice L. 
Mclsaac, Anna C. 
McKenna, Margaret 
McLaughlin, Mary R. 
McLennan, Catherine L. 
McLeod, Evelyn L. 
McLoud, Barbara C. 
McNamara, Mary A. 
McNamara, Winnifred C. 
McQueeney, Margaret F. 
McSweeney, Margaret M. 
Merritt, Edna G. 
Meskell, Catherine C. 
Metcalf, Elizabeth A. 
Milliken, Mildred L 
Mongan, Agnes 
Moore, Doris V. 
Moore, Margaret A. 
Moore, Marguerite E. 
Moran, Mary F. 
Morgan, Kathryne H. 
Morrell, Helen A. 
Mowers, Charlotte T. 
Mueller, Gertrude D. 
Muller, Wilhelmine 
Murljacich, Helen M. 
Murphy, Alice M. 
Murphy, Frances H. 
Murphy, Lucy E. 
Murphy, Mary G. 
Murray, Hazel M. 
Murray, Margaret F. 
Nangle, Lillian V. 
Nesbit, Ruth W. 
Newton, Elizabeth 
Nickerson, Mildred B. 
Norton, Agnes M. 
O'Brien, Helen T. 
O'Lalor, Catherine 
O'Leary, Anna T. 
O'Neill, Mary A. 
Parker, Bernice F. 
Parker, Ruthven C. 
Pearson, Vera L. 
Pelrine, Lillian 
Pendleton, Mary E. 



Perrins, Helen B. 
Phalan, Annie 
Phillips, Gertrude C. 
Pickernell, Mildred A. 
Pike, Elizabeth B. 
Powell, Irene E. 
Preble, Frances B. 
Priest, Mary C. 
Purnell, Dorothy F. 
Rideout, Eleanor G. 
Risdon, Martha K. 
Robbins, Selina A. 
Roche, Mary V. 
Ronan, Anna M. 
Ronan, Julia A. 
Rood, O. Mary 
Rush, Margaret E. 
Russell, Alice C. 
Ryan, Madeline O. 
Ryder, Lucia M. 
Sadlier, Mary L. 
Sadlier, Nellie C. 
Savary, Olive D. 
Scanlon, Eleanor H. 
Scanlon, Mary A. 
Seidman, May L. 
Seya, Senta H. 
Seymour, Olive L. 
Sliney, Mary A. 
Smith, Ruth 
Snow, Arline S. 
Snow, Ida T. 
Spooner, Katherine R. 
Sprague, Dorothy M. 
Staples, Lillian M. 
Stevens, Helen F. 
Strout, E. Leola 
Sullivan, Anna V. 
Sullivan, Louise M. 
Tarkka, Bertha 
Taylor, Edith 

Terozowski, Florence M. A. 
Tholander, Alta S. 
Thompson, Grace L. 
Thornton, Anna S. 
Tomlinson, Grace M. 
Toomey, Margaret E. 
Tracey, Gertrude H. 
Travaglia, Mary C. 
Tumbull, Evelyn A. 
Tyler, Sada M. 
Van Buskirk, Merna P. 
Walsh, Katherine Ann 
Walton, Harriet H. 
Waters, Mabel C. 
Weeks, Dorothy M. 
Wellington, Gladys M. 
Wessells, Bessie L. 
Westland, Mildred L. 



172 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Whalen, Louise M. 
White, Helen M. 
Wiggin, Corinne R. 
Wiggins, Catherine E. 
Williams, Dorothy 
Williams, Leah A. 
Wright, Emily R. 
Wright, Evelyn F. 
Young, Grace H. 
Young, L. Marion 
Young, Louise A. 



Adams, Henry H. 
Adams, Mountfort 
Albrecht, Fritz J. 
Akerley, Harold W. 
Anderson, Paul 5. A. 
Apel, George E. 
Austin, Alexander J. 
Bacigalupo, Edward J. 
Bennett, H. Paul 
Bergen, Peter J. 
Bird, James P. " 
Bloom, Morris 
Bloomer, John J. 
Bowe, John P. 
Bowman, John H. 
Breckenridge, Walter N. 
Brown, Walter 
Bryans, William R. 
Buckley, Robert 
Bush, Norman C. 
Caldarone, Joseph J. 
Cameron, Arthur S. 
Canniff, William J. 
Caplis, Oliver P. 
Chipman, Robert G. 
Clark, Herbert R. 
Collins, George F. 
Connell, Chester D. 
Connolly, Joseph F. 
Conway, Clarence A. 
Crandell, Frank J. 
Crouse, Archie W. 
Crumby, Fred H. 
Curley, William M. 
Currier, Reynold A. 
Daniels, Charles G. 
DePadua, Alfred J. 
Dewar, Russell K. 
Di Silva, Joseph 
Dodge, Leonard F. 
Dolben, Alfred H. 
Donnelly, Leonard C. 
Dresser, Herbert A. 
Duffee, Joseph J. 
Dunn, Brian 



Dunning, Robert H. 
Durgin, Charles T. 
Ellis, Chester F. 
Ellison, John H. 
Elis, Ralph W. 
Falvey, Daniel P. 
Ferris, J. Edward 
Fleming, Thomas J. 
Flynn, Joseph J. 
Forest, George L. 
Francis, Chester S. 
Freeman, Harold P. 
Fuller, Malcolm R. 
Fullerton, George F. 
Gee, Frank A. 
Gilliatt, William H. 
Gillon, Clifford J. 
Goggin, Harold J. 
Golden, Leo 
Gonia, Walter H. 
Goodwin, Whitman G. 
Graham, Robert L. 
Grant, E. Allison 
Gregory, Maynard R. 
Grinnell, Kenneth F. 
Grue, Joseph L. 
Hallion, Richard P. 
Hammond, Lloyd 
Hamford, F. Paul 
Hanni, George E. 
Hanzlik, Otis H. 
Harkins, Bernard 
Hart, Murray B. 
Hedberg, Alf N. 
Held, Albert 
Herlihy, Thomas C. 
Hicks, Carlton S. 
Hill, Carroll 
Holden, George W. 
Hubert, Walter J. 
Hurwitz, Alfred W. 
Johnston, Peter 
Keely, James E. 
Kernzkoski, Joseph A. 
King, Melvin C. 
Lane, Harold J. 
Lawlor, J. Warren 
Littlefield, Elmer L. 
Lounsbury, Frank L. 
Macdonald, George A. 
MacGillivray, Thomas R. 
Marchant, Alvin C. 
Marmaud, James L. 
Marston, Roger 
Martin, Russell S. 
McCarthy, Lawrence 
McCarthy, William T. 
McGilvray, Donald C. 
McGrath, James Elmer 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



17^5 



McKenzie, James S. 
Meaney, Stephen J. 
Meskill, John M. 
Miner, Clinton E. 
Morrow, John A. 
Moulton, Irving M. 
Mulvey, George E. 
Murphy, Harold J, 
Nichols, Charles G. 
Norris, Edmund T. 
Nowell, Carl B. 
O'Connell, Henry J. 
O'Connell, John M. 
O'Hanian, Nishan 
O'Hara, John F. 
O'Neill, Jeremiah L. 
O'Neill, John J. 
Owens, Chester F. 
Parker, Paul E. 
Parkhurst, Chandler 
Peacon, Carroll 
Phillips, H. Woodman 
Pierce, Winslow H. 
Pike, Andrew F. 
Porter, Franklin W. 
Powers, James W. 
Prescott, Ronald C. 
Price, Herman 
Purtell, Joseph B. 
Quail, Harold C. 
Quinn, Henry V. 
Rauh, Robert D. 
Reed, Nathan E. 
Rice, Earl G. 
Rice, Harry E. 
Ring, Gerald D. 
Roberts, Lawrence C. 
Robertson, Raymond A. 
Robinson, Benjamin 
Robinson, Charles 
Robinson, Walter V. 
Rogers, Lemuel J. 
Rosenthal, Edward A. 
Rowe, Homer A, 
Rowe, John H. 



Runcy, Francis A. 
Runey, Francis E. 
Russell, John R, 
Sahlin, Carl E. 
Sampson, Carleton P. 
Sandstrom, Ernest W. 
Sexton, Bernard J. 
Sharkey, George A. 
Sharkey, James A. 
Shea, Robert A. 
Sibley, Alfred E. 
Siegel, Louis 
Smith, Tracy 
Snyder, Raymond S. 
iSpering, Edward F. 
Sprague, Herbert B. 
Stack, Arthur E. 
Stack, William R. 
Stackpole, Irving L. 
Stanley, Wilbur G. 
Stevens, Howard C. 
Stevens, William 
Stewart, James S. 
Sullivan, Richard J. 
Sumner, John K. 
Swenson, Arthur S. 
Tadgell, Henry A. 
Teague, Charles B, 
Thiesfeldt, Henry A. 
Thorne, Lester A. 
Ticehurst, Lawrence E. 
Towle, F. Martin 
Tremblay, Joseph 
Tribe, Donald B. 
Tribon, Francis L. 
Tutein, Warren 
Vinal, Albert F. 
Waite, Don 
Wallace, Raymond H. 
Warren, Frederick R, 
Watkins, Arthur E. 
Wells, Irving D. 
Whitman, Herbert L. 
Wolf, Kenneth J. 
Woodworth, Arthur W. 



TABLE 27. — VOCATIONAL SCHOOL GRADUATES. 
Vocational School for Boys. 



Begin, Raymond J. 
Crosby, John F. 
Fraser, Lester F. 
Lavender, Harold B/ 
McKay, James F. 



Murphy, John F. 
Nelson, Ivan E. 
Roach, Stephen F. 
Turgiss, William W. 



174 * ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Vocational School for Girls. 

Gilman, Carolyn Jeane Prescott, Evelyn Grace 

Hartley, Mary Agnes Prest, Dorothy F. 

McDowell, M. Doris Simmons, Blanche Eliott 

McKay, Lillian Eliza Stevens, Florence Helen 
Mehigan, Elizabeth Rita 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



175 



Table 28. — Organization of School Board, 1920. 
School Committee. 



Herbert Cholerton 
WiLUAM M. Morrison 



Chairman 
Vice-chairman 



Members. 

EX-OFFICnS. 

Charles W. Eldridge, Mayor, 
Richard L. Rice, President Board of 

WARD one. 
Francis J. Fitzpatrick, 
William T. McCarthy, 



Daniel H. Bradley, 
Christopher J. Muldoon, 

Charles W. Boyer, 
Oscar W. Codding, 

Frank M. Hawes, 
Edward I. Tripp, 

Harry M. Stoodley, 
Miss Minnie S, Turner, 

Walter I, Chapman, 
William M. Morrison, 

Herbert Cholerton, 
Paul O. Curtis, 



WARD TWO. 



ward three. 



WARD FOUR. 



WARD FIVE. 



WARD SIX. 



WARD SEVEN. 



47 Highland road. 
Aldermen, 296 ^/^ Broadway. 



76 Broadway. 
38 Pearl street. 

19 Concord avenue. 
88 Concord avenue. 

104 Summer street. 
59 Vinal avenue. 

257 School Street. 
21 Wigglesworth street. 

283 Highland avenue. 
64 Hudson street. 

18-A Central street. 
97 Rogers avenue. 

94 College avenue. 
41 Mason street. 



Superintendent of Schools. 

Charles S. Clark. 

Office: City Hall Annex, Highland avenue. 

Residence: 75 Munroe street. 

The Superintendent's office will be open on school days from 8 
to 5; Saturdays, 8 to 10. His office hour is 4 o'clock on school days, 
and 8:30 on Saturdays. 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools^ 
Joseph A. Ewart. 

Residence: 11 Bigelow street. 

Office hour: 4 o'clock on school days, and 8:30 on Saturdays. 

Superintendent's office force: — 

Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland avenue. 

Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland avenue. 

H. Madeline Kodad, 1067 Broadway. 

Arline P. Hall, 189 Pearl street. 



Board Meetings. 

January 26. April 26. September 27. 

February 23. May 31. October 25. 

March 29. June 28. November 29. 

8:15 o'clock. 



December 24. 
December 31. 



176 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 28. — Organization of School Board, 1920. — Concluded. 
Standing Committees. 

Note. — The member first named is chairman. 
District I. — McCarthy, Fitzpatrick, Muldoon. 

PBESCOTT, HANSCOM, BENNETT. 

District II. — Muldoon, Bradley, Codding. 

3EtNAPP, PERRY, BAXTER. 

District III. — Codding, Boyer, Fitzpatrick. 

POPE, CUMMINGS. 

District IV. — Hawes, Tripp, Miss Turner. 

EDGERLY, GLINES. 

District V. — Stoodley, Miss Turner, Hawes. 

FORSTER, BINGHAM. 

District VI. — Morrison, Chapman, Stoodley. 

CARR, MORSE, PROCTOR, DURELL, BURNS, BROWN. 

District VII. — Cholerton, Curtis, Morrison. 

HIGHLAND, CUTLER, LINCOLN, LOWE. 

High School. — Bradley, Hawes, Fitzpatrick, Codding, Stoodley, Morri- 
son, Cholerton. 

Finance. — Stoodley, Bradley, Fitzpatrick, Codding, Tripp, Morrison, 
Cholerton, Eldridge, Rice. 

Text-Books and Courses of Study. — Muldoon, Miss Turner, McCarthy, 
Boyer, Tripp, Chapman, Curtis. 

Industrial Education. — Tripp, Boyer, Fitzpatrick, Muldoon, Miss Tur- 
ner, Chapman, Curtis. 

School Accommodations. — Codding, Chapman, McCarthy, Bradley, 
Hawes, Stoodley, Cholerton, Eldridge, Rice. 

Teachers. — Cholerton, Muldoon, Codding, Miss Turner, Morrison. 

Health, Physical Training and Athletics. — Morrison, Curtis, McCarthy, 
Muldoon, Boyer, Tripp, Stoodley. 

Rules and Regulations. — Hawes, McCarthy, Bradley,. 



SCHOOL DErARTMENT. 177 



TABLE 29. — TEACHERS IN SERVICE, JANUARY, 1920. 

Name and Residence 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Central Hill. 

John A. Avery, Head Master, 22 Dartmouth Street 

Everett W. Tuttle, Vice-Head Master, 62 Highland Avenue 

Frank H. Wilkins, Master, 93 Raymond Avenue 

John L. Hayward, Master, 242 School Street 

Harry F. Sears, Master, 44 Orris Street, Melrose Highlands 

William W. Obear, Master, 86 Belmont Street 

George M. Hosmer, Sub-Master, 13 Arlington Street 

Laurence A. Sprague, Sub-Master, 17 Perkins St., W. Newton 

John M. Jaynes, Sub-Master, 89 Oxford Street 

Guy C. Blodgett, Sub-Master, 125 Lexington Street, Woburn 

Arthur N. Small, Sub-Master, 11a Harvard Street 

Fred W. Carrier, Sub-Master, 84 Walnut Street, Winchester 

Wallace S. Hall, Norfolk, Mass., 

Irving P. Colman, Sub-Master, Greenbush 

Stephen H. Mahoney, Sub-Master, 10 Oxford Street 

Albert O. Plantinga, 83 Park Street, Melrose 

Lester W. Dearborn, Sub-Master, 78 Josephine Avenue 

George E. Pearson, Sub-Master, 325 Highland Avenue 

George S. McLaughlin, 14-A Cottage Avenue 

Leander T. DeCelles, 46 Ware Street 

A. Marion Merrill, Sub-Master, 2 Madison Street 

Helen L. Follansbee, Sub-Master, 40 Vinal Avenue 

Frances W. Kaan, Assistant, 133 Central Street 

Mrs. Lena Gilbert, Assistant, 7 Kingston Street 

Harriet E. Tuell, Assistant, 40 Vinal Avenue 

Elizabeth Campbell, Assistant, 112 Summer Street 

A. Laura Batt, Assistant, 2 Madison Street 

M. Helen Teele, Assistant, 11 Jason Street, Arlington 

Clara A. Johnson, Assistant, 177 Central Street 

Elizabeth H. Hunt, Assistant, 529 Newbury Street, Boston 

Blanche S. Bradford, Assistant, 163 Summer Street 

Grace E. W. Sprague, Assistant, 888 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge 

Mrs. Lucy I. Topliff, Assistant, 69 Cypress Street, Brookline 

Eudora Morey, Assistant, 121 St. Stephen Street, Boston 

Ella D. Gray, Assistant, 147 Walnut Street 

Grace Gatchell, Assistant, 48 Vinal Avenue 

A. Marguerite Browne, Assistant, 27 Everett Street, Cambridge 

Edith L. Hurd, Assistant, 125 Central Street 

*Julia T. Connor, Assistant, 59 Church Street 

Esther Parmenter, Assistant, Lynnfield Centre 

Annie C. Woodward, Assistant, 2 Madison Street 

Alice A. Todd, Assistant, 82 Munroe Street 

Ella W. Bowker, Assistant, 2 Hillside Avenue 

Florence L. McAllister, Assistant, 23 Wallace Street 

Laura R. Cunningham, Assistant, 62 Highland Avenue 

Ruth A. Davis, Assistant, 44 Benton Road 

♦Leave of absence. 



Began 


Salary. 


Serv- 




ice. 


$4,100 


1895 


2,850 


1895 


2,700 


1906 


2,500 


1913 


2,600 


1901 


2,600 


1906 


2,300 


1901 


2,300 


1906 


2,300 


1901 


2,300 


1910 


2,300 


1916 


2,100 


1915 


2,100 


1919 


1,900 


1915 


2,300 


1914 


2,000 


1918 


1,900 


1914 


1,900 


1914 


2,000 


1919 


1,500 


1919 


1,950 


1895 


1,950 


1900 


1,750 


1882 


1,650 


1892 


1,800 


1899 


1,800 


1902 


1,800 


1895 


1,800 


1895 


1,700 


1897 


1,650 


1908 


1,650 


1903 


■ 1,650 


1908 


1,700 


1914 


1,600 


1874 


1,550 


1901 


1,600 


1906 


J 1,700 


1908 


1.600 


1910 


1,600 


1910 


1,550 


1911 


1.700 


1906 


1,550 


1913 


1,600 


1911 


1,550 


1913 


1,550 


1914 


1,550 


1914 



178 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 29. — ^Teachers in Service January, 1920. — Continued. 



Name and Residence. 

Julia A. Haley, Assistant, 88 Prospect Street 

Mary C, Smith, Assistant, 117 Prospect Street 

Gladys L. Swallow, Assistant, 15 Pleasant Avenue 

Alfreda Veazie, Assistant, 193 Linden Street, Everett 

Mrs. Phebe E. Mathews, Assistant, 159 Morrison Avenue 

B. Phoebe Abbott, Assistant, 67 Perrin Street, Roxbury 

Ruth E. Low, Assistant, 58 Central Street 

Ilene C. Ritchie, Assistant, 15 Willoughby Street 

Margaret E. Ford, 83 Brattle Street, Cambridge 

Ella W. Burnham, 40 Vinal Avenue 

Mrs. Cornelia D. Pratt, 112-A Glenwood Road 

Bernice O. Newborg, 12 Hale Avenue, Medford 

Louise M. Saunders, 1 Waterhouse Street, Cambridge 

Mrs. Bessie G. Clarke, Assistant, 28 Highland Avenue 

Gertrude W. ChafRn, 4 Copeland Terrace, Maiden 

Ruth L. Ranger, Assistant, 71 Irving Street 

Ruth T. Merritt, Assistant, 102 Gainsboro Street, Boston 

Doris B. Cresto, Assistant, 52 Rush Street 

Elizabeth M. Welch, Asst., 3 Washington Av., Arlington Heights 

Harriet M. Bell, Assistant, 92 Orchard Street, Cambridge 

Matilda C. Wright, Matron, 17 Gibbens Street 

*Edythe L. Miller, Librarian, 10 Sycamore Street 

Mabell M. Ham, Clerk, 41 Boston Street 

♦Part-time. 





Began 




Serv- 


Salary. 


ice. 


$1,450 


1913 


1,550 


1916 


1,450 


1916 


1,500 


1916 


1,450 


1916 


1,350 


1916 


1.550 


1913 


1,550 


1912 


1,500 


1918 


1,500 


1919 


1,450 


1918 


1,350 


1918 


1,500 


1919 


1,500 


1919 


1,450 


1916 


1,400 


1919 


1,350 


1919 


1,100 


1919 


1,450 


1919 


1,600 


1904 


1,000 


1919 


650 


1919 


1.100 


1906 



EASTERN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. 

Pearl Street. 

Samuel A. Johnson, Master, 91 Central Street $2,700 1916 

Francis J. Mahoney, Vice-Principal, 16 Parker Street 2,100 1919 

Walter W. Newcombe, Sub-Master, 138 Sycamore Street 1,900 1917 

Elizabeth M. Warren, 109 Highland Avenue 1,525 1897 

Sarah H. Christie, 78 Sycamore Street 1,450 1914 

Edyth M. Grimshaw, 316 Hyde Park Avenue, Jamaica Plain 1,450 1909 

Pertie I. Gray, 228 Broadway 1,450 1917 

Ida M. Record, 10 Cambria Street 1,450 1899 

Edith L. Laycock, 10 Franklin Street ~ 1.450 1913 

Elizabeth J. Mooney, 168 Summer Street 1,450 1904 

Catherine Heagney, 32 Sewall Street 1,450 1912 

Mary A. Hickey, 41 Sever Street, Charlestown 1,300 1918 

Elma Isaac, 32 Richardson Street, Brighton 1,200 1918 

Velma B. Strout, 36 Francesca Avenue 1,450 1918 

Theresa Morrison, 174 Broadway 1,450 1912 

Hazel W. Ruggles, 20 Hawthorne Street, Roxbury 1,400 1918 

Helen B. Ryan, 35 Columbus Avenue 1,350 1918 

Mrs. Ellen H. Coughlan. 37 Brastow Avenue 1,250 1916 

Alice M. McNally, 50 Church Street, Watertown 1,300 1917 

Mrs. Constance H. Scherer, 25 Falmouth Street, Belmont 1.450 1917 

Kathinka Fessman, 1126 Boylston Street, Boston 1.600 1912 

Olive E. Whittier, 78 Sycamore Street 1,450 1918 

tMrs. Grace M. Dorey, 12 North Avenue, Roxbury 1,000 1919 



t Temporary teacher. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



179 



TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1920. — Continued 

Name and Residence 

SOUTHERN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. 

Vinal Avenue. 



George M. Wadsworth, Master, Whitman 

Raymond E. Shepherd, Vice-Principal, 16 Grand View Avenue 

Arthur E. Gordon, Sub-Master, 116 School Street 

Melvin T. Carver, Sub-Master, 17 Hubbard Avenue, Cambridge 

Alice L. Davis, 40 Vinal Avenue 

Clara B. Sackett, 91 Summer Street 

Mrs. Blanche G. North, 25 Columbus Avenue 

Mrs. Gertrude W. Leighton, 159 Mill Street, Abington 

Grace T. Merritt, 10 Charnwood Road 

Marie T. Smith-Brandt, 64 Vinal Avenue 

Lilla E. Mann, 76 Highland -Avenue 

Mrs. Mary B. Soule, 39 Walnut Street 

Leila L. Rand, 43 Norfolk Road, Arlington 

Rena S. Hezelton, 48 Lawrence Street, Medford 

N. Theresa McCarthy, 9 Centre Street, Woburn 

Edith L. French, 52 Prescott Street 

Emma J. Kennedy, 15 Pleasant Avenue 

Charlotte A. Holmes, 24 Cambria Street 

Ada G. Macdonald, 43 Babcock Street, Brookline 

Esther L. Small, 17 Pleasant Avenue 

Anna J. Coll, 65 Newton Street 

Anna E. McCully, 12 Francis Street 

Ellen M. Burchell, 51 Avon Street 

Annette B. MacKnight, 45 Sawyer Avenue 

F. Antoinette Pratt, 31 Vinal Avenue 

Katherine E. Read, 7 Newman Way, Arlington 

Clarisse L. Tirrell, 51 Avon Street 

Olive M. Brownell, 62 Simpson Avenue 





Began 


Salary. 


Serv- 




ice. 


'$2,700 


1891 


^ 2,100 


1919 


2,000 


1918 


1,900 


1917 


1,600 


1895 


1,450 


1891 


1,450 


1893 


1,450 


1895 


1,450 


1897 


1,450 


1898 


1,450 


1902 


1,450 


1902 


1,450 


1906 


1,450 


1909 


1,450 


1909 


1,450 


1912 


1,450 


1912 


1,450 


1899 


1,450 


1914 


1,450 


1914 


1,250 


1916 


1,250 


1916 


1,400 


1918 


1,600 


1918 


1,400 


1918 


1,300 


1918 


1,450 


1918 


1,400 


1919 



NORTHERN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. 
Sycamore Street and Evergreen Avenue. 

Frank W. Seabury, Master, 18 Winslow Avenue $2,700 1919 

Joseph S. Hawthorne, Vice Principal, 233 School Street 2,200 1915 

Arthur J. Marchant, Sub-Master, 99 Glenwood Road 2,000 1914 

^Walter P. Sweet, 215 College Avenue 1,900 1919 

Mary I. Bradish, 112 Magoun Avenue, Medford 1,450 1899 

Emma G. Blanchard, 146 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston 1,550 1902 

Mrs. Mina P. Bickford, 216 Park Street, Medford 1,450 1903 

Mary F. Mead, 35 Kidder Avenue 1,450 1905 

M. Edna Merrill, 228 Broadway 1,450 1909 

Anna R. Walsh, 27 Avon Street 1,400 1914 

May A. Daly, 27 Avon Street ~ 1,500 1915 

Dorothy A. Chapin, 11 Mystic Street 1,400 1917 

Catherine E. Giles, 5 Bradbury Avenue, Wellington 1,200 1918 

Ruth C. Harrington, 26 Oak Street 1,400 1918 

Mary C. Fox, 28 Linden Street 1,200 1918 

Florence R. Gallagher, 16 Otis Street, Medford 1,300 1918 

May B. Thompson, 459 Broadway 1,400 1918 

Minnie A. Holden, 31 Warren Avenue 1.450 1906 

Jane H. Perkins, 9 Winter Hill Circle 1,450 1919 

Maud Rose, 53 Albion Street 1,450 3 919 

Alice M. Patterson, 108 Glenwood Road 1,300 1919 

Mrs. Ruth Hawkins, 1673 Cambridge Street, Cambridge 1,400 1919 

Gladys F. McDonnell, 25 Bucknam Street, Everett 1.250 1919 

Annie G. Merrill, 33 Stuart Street, Everett 1,300 1919 

Marie Clifford, 1648 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge 1,450 1907 

Mary Donoghue. 80 Porter Road, Cambridge 1,450 1911 



180 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 29. — Teachers In Service January, 1920. — Continued. 



Name and Residence. 
WESTERN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. 

Holland Street. 



Arthur L. Doe, Master, 27 Spruce Street, Maiden 
James S. Thistle, Vice-Principal, 26 Packard Avenue 
John J. McLaughlin, Sub-Master, 84 Inman Street, Cambridge 
Ralph B. Farnsworth, Sub-Master, 26 Glenwood Ave., Camb. 
Charles M. Dunbar, Sub-Master, 8 Dickson Street 
Edith W. Emerson, 135 Central Street 
Sarah E. Pray, 58 Liberty Avenue 
Clara B. Parkhurst, 146 Highland Avenue 
Flora A. Burgess, 3 Crescent Hill Avenue, Arlington 
Alice S. Hall, 135 Central Street 
Edith F. Hersey, 287 Medford Street 
Annie G. Smith, 59 Maple Street, Maiden 
Mary L. Bryant, 41 Mason Street 

Mrs. Genieve R. Barnes, Winthrop Chambers, Cambridge 
Florence M. Hopkins, 14 Lowden Avenue 
Elsie M. Ross, 38 Westland Avenue, Boston 
Isabelle M. Brunton, 33 Walnut Street 
Katherine A. Breen, 81 Avon Street 
L. Alice Grady, 19 Billings Avenue, Medford 
Elizabeth R. Henderson, 12 Curtis Avenue 
Marion F. Orne, 43 Fairmount Avenue 
Helen I. Stearns, 106 College Avenue 
Mrs. Mae W. Conant, 68 Wallace Street 
Marcella M. Garrick, 295 Lowell St. 
Blanche Preston, 84 Packard Ave. 
Miriam E. Priest, 6 Hudson Street 
Grace M. Sanders, 131 Main St., Maiden 
Geneva C. Tobey, 43 Chelsea St., Everett 
Gertrude E. Tynan, 131 Summer Street, Watertown 
Mabel C. Whitaker, 75 Walnut St. 
Miriam W. Hatch, 65 Walker Street, Cambridge 
Sophia C. Mague, 1766 Washington Street, Auburndale 
Jessie M. Howard, 5 Westwood Road 
Hazel M. Yaegar, 1791 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge 
Helen A. Moran, 483 Medford Street 
Emma M. Damon, 89 Central Street 





Began 




Serv- 


Salary. 


ice, 


'$2,700 


1896 


2,200 


1917 


2,000 


1916 


1,850 


1918 


1,600 


1919 


1,600 


1896 


1,450 


1877 


X,450 


1889 


1,450 


1894 


1,450 


1896 


1.450 


1899 


1,450 


1901 


1,450 


1903 


1,450 


1905 


1,450 


1907 


1,450 


1908 


1,450 


1910 


1,450 


1912 


1,450 


1912 


1,450 


1912 


1,450 


1912 


1,450 


1916 


1,450 


1917 


1,200 


1917 


1,450 


1917 


1,400 


1917 


1,300 


1917 


1,300 


1917 


1,300 


1917 


1,450 


1917 


1,350 


1919 


1,450 


1917 


1,100 


1919 


1,550 


1919 


1,200 


1919 


1,450 


1908 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



181 



TABLE 29. — Teachers In Service January, 1920. — Continued 

Name and Residence 
VOCATIONAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS (Day) 

Davis Building, Tufts Street. 



Began 
Serv- 
Salary ice. 



Harry L. Jones, Principal, 137 Powder House Blvd. $3,300 1914 

Nehemiah E. Gillespie, 28 Worcester Sq., Boston 2,100 1911 

Charles A. Kirkpatrick, 27 Sewall Street 2.000 1913 

H. Ralph Aubin, 6 Oxford Street 1,900 1917 

Roy R. King, 18 Landers Street 1,850 1918 

Phillip J. Heffernan, 13 Pleasant Avenue 1,650 1918 

Benjamin C. Bowman, 102 Walnut Street 1,400 1919 
Leah P. Scholes, Clerk, 6 Sargent Avenue 11.00 per week 1919 



VOCATIONAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

High School Building. 

Mary Henleigh Brown, Prin., 61 Garfield St., Camb. $2,200 
fLucy Dorr, 124 Summer Street 1,450 

Mrs. Vernie T. Neily, 96 Heath Street 1,450 



1911 
1911 
1916 



(WILLIAM H.) PRESCOTT SCHOOL 
Grade. Pearl and Myrtle Streets. 

Samuel A. Johnson, Master, 91 Central St. 
4. Clara Taylor, 36 Flint Street 
3, Elizabeth L. Marvin, 17 Summit Street 
2. Louise E. Pratt, 40 Greenville Street 
1. Jeannette M. Hannabell, 166 Highland Avenue 
1. JMrs. Grace E. Allen, 271 Summer Street 



$1,450 

1,450 

1,450 

1,450 

900 



1893 
1871 
1898 
1889 
1917 
1919 





1919 


$1,600 


1908 


1,450 


1903 


1,450 


1906 


1,450 


1908 


1,450 


1914 


1,450 


1897 


900 


1919 


1,450 


1909 


1,450 


1912 


1,450 


1903 


900 


1919 


1,350 


1907 


1,100 


1918 


550 


1919 



SANFORD HANSCOM SCHOOL. 
Webster and Rush Streets. 

Florence A. Chaney, Master, 7 Westwood Road 
5. Mrs. Agness M. Travis, 100 Park Avenue, Winthrop 
4. Jennie M. Twiss, 67 Berkeley Street 

4. Maude A. Nichols, 166 Highland Avenue 
3. Frances E. Robinson, 25 Indiana Avenue 

3. Mrs. Nellie W. McPheters> 163 Summer Street 
2. Martha L. Littlefleld, 65 Glen Street 
2. JEthel H. Werner, 59 Cedar Street 

2. Florence M. Shaw, 58 Central Street 
. 1. Marion A. Viets, 122 Dale Street, Waltham 

1. Alice M. Saben, 40 Greenville Street 

1. ^Josephine Lacy, 63 Cherry Street 
*Kind'n. Elizabeth J. Baker, 78 Boston Street 

Kind'n, Gertrude Prichard, 5 Webster Street 

Asst. A. Frances Harrington, 32 Pearl Street, Medford 

CLARK BENNETT SCHOOL. 
Poplar and Maple Streets. 

John S. Emerson, Master, 3 Preston Road $2,700 1919 

5. Kate B. Gifford, 66 Highland Avenue 1„600 1902 

4. Eleanor W. Nolan, 81 Benton Road 1,450 1909 
4, 3. Eliza I. Patterson, 14 Lincoln Avenue 1,300 1919 

3. Mrs. Nettie L. Fay, 15 Pleasant Avenue 1,450 1901 

2. Isadore E. Taylor, 36 Flint Street 1,450 1883 
2. Alice A. Tassinari, 94 Beacon Street 1,206 1919 

2, 1. Mrs. Amy F. Woodbury, 183 College Avenue 1,450 1917 

1. Alice M. Hayes, 81 Benton Road 1,450 1913 

1. Mrs. Cora B. Gowen, 87 St. Stephen Street, Boston 1,450 1906 

Kind'n. Helen E. Harrington, 1675 Massachusetts Ave., Caml 1,350 1912 

Asst. M. Regina Desmond, 3 Oak Street, Charlestown 1,009 1918 

Non-Eng. Mrs. Lillias T. Lawton, 30 King Street, Dorchester 1,450 1913 
t Part time. 
* Leave of Absence. 
t Temporary teacher. 



Continued 






Began 




Serv- 


Salary. 


ice. 




1919 


'$1,'550 


1900 


1,450 


1908 


1,400 


1916 


1,450 


1912 


a&e 1,450 


1906 


1,350 


1903 


1,150 


1911 



12,600 


1919 


1,600 


1914 


1,450 


1906 


1,450 


1917 


1,200 


1919 


1,450 


1919 


1,300 


1919 


1,300 


1918 


1,450 


1891 


1,450 


1911 


1,400 


1913 



182 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1920. — 

Name and Residence. 

GEORGE L. BAXTER SCHOOL. 
Grade Bolton Street. 

Francis A. Ryan, Master, 25 Stone Avenue 

5. Mary G. Blackwell, Principal, 45 Ibbetson Street 

4. Etta R. Holden, 30 Warren Avenue 

3. Margaret M, Breen, 461 Somerville Avenue 

2. Sue A. Fitzpatrick, 451-a Somerville Avenue 

1. Maria D. McLeod, 78 Larchwood Drive, Cambridge 
Kind'n. Eleanor A. Connor, 59 Church Street 

Asst, Martha W. Delay, 48 Beacon Street 

OREN S. KNAPP SCHOOL 
concord Avenue. 

Francis A. Ryan, Master, 25 Stone Avenue 

6. Mrs. Clara B. Donlon, Ayer 
*6. Nona E. Blackwell, 45 Ibbetson Street 

6. Winifred I. Macdonald, 43 Babcock Street, Brookline 
6. Mary G. McCarthy, 246 School Street 

5. Ellen C. Moynihan, 67 Avon Street 

4. Eleanor M. Lundgren, 50 Harrison Street 

3. Agnes C. Riley, 451 Somerville Avenue 

2. Mrs. Minnie P. Cunningham, 77 Walnut Street 
*1. M. Edith Callahan, Woburn 

1. Mary L. Gallagher, 81 Benton Road 

ALBION A. PERRY SCHOOL. 
Washington Street, near Dane Street, 

Francis A. Ryan, Master, 25 Stone Avenue 1919 

6. Catherine E. Sweeney, Principal, 633 Broadway $1,550 1901 

5. 'Mary A- Mullin, 27 Shawmut Street 1,450 1910 

4. Irene Vincent, 47 Vinal Avenue 1,450 1903 

3. L. Gertrude Allen, 230 Washington Street 1,450 1884 

2. Mrs. Sarah E. Murphy, 120 Rogers Avenue 1,450 1906 
1. Grace R. O'Neil, 347 Washington Street 1,450 1913 

CHARLES G. POPE SCHOOL. 
Washington and Boston Streets. 

Florence A. Chaney, Master, 7 Westwood Road 

6. Alice I. Norcross, 90 Russell Avenue, Watertown 
6. Harriet M. Clark, 10 Vernon Street, West Medford 

6. M. Abibie Tarbett, 11 Washington Street, Stoneham 

5. Marie Higgins, 55 School Street 
5. C. Edith Taylor, 36 Flint Street . 

5, 4. Lizzie W. Parkhurst, 146 Highland Avenue 

4. Annie G. Sheridan, 57 Stanley Avenue, Medford 
4, 3. tEleanor E. Waldron, 135 Powder House Boulevard 

3. M. Katherine Davis, 9 Harvard Place 
3, 2. Florence E. Locke, 393 Broadway, Cambridge 

2, 1. Mary J. Dewire, 384 Washington Street 

1. Alice B. Frye, 12 Champa Avenue, Maiden 

(JOHN A.) CQMMINGS SCHOOL. 
School Street, near Highland Avenue. 

Charles G. Ham, Master, Watertown 

4. Fannie L. Gwynne, Principal, 65 School Street 
3. Katherine M. Fox, 150 Franklin Street, Stoneham 

2. Elizabeth L. Hersey, 96 Oxford Street 
1. Mrs. Stella M. Hadley, 11 Greene Street 

• Leave of absence, 
t Temporary teacher. 



$2,300 


19J9 


1,600 


1885 


1,450 


1893 


1,450 


1906 


1,450 


1919 


1,200 


1917 


1,450 


1885 


1,450 


1886 


900 


1919 


1,450 


1904 


1,450 


1899 


1,400 


1913 


1,450 


1904 





1919 


$1,550 


1886 


1,450 


1896 


1,450 


1896 


1,450 


1914 



SCHOOL DErARTMENT. 



183 



TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1920. — Continued. 



Name and Residence. 

(JOHN G.) EDGERLY SCHOOL. 

Grade. Cross and Bonair Streets. 

Charles E. Brainard, Master, 82 Munroe Street 

6. Edith M. Snell, 4 Vine Street, Melrose 

6. Annie L. Dimpsey, Hotel Woodbridge 

6. Mary E. Richardson, 26 Oxford Street 

6. Isabelle M. Gray, 25 Webster Street 

6, 5. Mabel C. Mansfield, 26 Oxford Street 

5. Berta M. BurnettJ 1619 Mass. Ave., Cambridge 

5. G. Hortense Pentecost, 17 Walnut Road 

5. Myrtle M. Irwin, 41 Putnam Street 

4. Mrs. Louise S. Weare, Commonwealth Hotel, Boston 

3. Lillian Nealley, 109 Glen Street 

2. Alice W. Cunningham, 62 Highland Avenue 

1. Martha M. Power, 37 Gleason St., West Medford 



Began 
Serv- 
Salary. ice. 



$2,700 
1,600 
1,450 
1,450 
1,450 
1,450 
1,450 
1,450 
1,300 
1,450 
1,450 
1,450 
1,450 



1889 
1900 
1891 
1893 
1897 
1893 
1915 
1905 
1916 
1896 
1882 
1901 
1890 



JACOB T. GLINES SCHOOL. 
Jaques Street, near Grant Street. 

Charles E. Brainard, Master, 82 Munroe Street 

6. Margaret A. Orr, 146 Massachusetts Ave., Boston 

6. Harriet F. Ward, 82 Boston Street 

5. Alice C. Blodgett, 55 Tennyson Street 

5. Clara D. Eddy, 164 Central Street 

4. *Florence K. Watkins, 22 Hamilton Road 

4. Mrs. Carrie Armitage, 57 Madison Street 

4, 3. Editha A. Sharkey, 7 Wesley Park 

3. Florence E. Baxter, 42 Highland Avenue 

3. Cora J. Demond, 146 Mass. Avenue, Boston 

2. Edith M. Dow, 58 Central Street 

2. Florence W. Schroeder, 268 Summer Street 

1. Leslie Caverly, 9 Wildwood Street, Winchester 

1. Isabel J. Tifft, 109 Highland Avenue 

Asst. Marguerite Driscoll, 396 Medford Street 

Kind'n. Mrs. Etta D. Ellsworth, Trinity Court, Boston 

Asst. Ida M. Kane, 28 Fellsway West 

(CHARLES) FORSTER SCHOOL. 
Sycamore Street and Evergreen Avenue. 

Frank W. Seabury, Master. 18 Winslow Avenue 
6, 5. Elizabeth F. Clement, 29 Kidder Avenue 
5, 4. Annie S. Gage, 32 Marshall Street 
3, 2. Carrie T. Lincoln, 65 Ashland Street, Medford 
2, 1. Grace Shorey, 23 Forster Street 



$1,600 
1,450 
1,400 
1,450 
900 
1,450 
1,200 
1,450 
1,450 
1,450 
1,275 
1,450 
1,450 
900 
1,350 
1,150 



$1,450 
1,450 
1.450 
1,450 



1919 
1890 
1895 
1917 
1900 
1919 
1899 
1919 
1891 
1900 
1914 
1915 
1908 
1892 
1919 
1897 
1905 



1919 

1884 
1881 
1893 

1892 



(NORMAN W.) BINGHAM SCHOOL. 
Lowell Street, near Vernon Street. 

Harry F, Hathaway, Master, 29 Albion Street $2,700 1890 

6. Elizabeth, J. O'Neil, 29 Albion Street 1,600 1894 

6. Maude M. Cunningham, 29 Albion Street 1,450 1913 

6, 5. Jane Batson, 15 Florence Street, Maiden 1,450 1900 

5. Helen M. Farr, 4 Oak Street, Belmont 1,275 1915 

5. Elizabeth S. Brown, 58 Thurston Street 1,450 1897 

4. Clara L. Grifnths, 39 Ames Street 1,450 1902 

4. Anna R. Canfield, 205 Cedar Street 1,350 1914 

4, 3. Barbara E. Drummey, 43 Short Street, Marlboro 1,350 1918 

,3. Lillian F. Commins, 24 Hanson Street 1,275 1914 

3. Lynda V. Merrill. 26 Brastow Avenue 1,450 1912 

2. G. Marion Lovering, 27 Flint Street 1,400 1913 

2. Priscilla A. Merritt, 96 Oxford Street 1,450 1885 

2, 1. M. Gertrude McCarthy, 36 Brastow Avenue 1,200 1917 

1. Mabel E. Mansir, 77 Albion Street 1,450 1894 

1. Ethel Gross, 8 Fosket Street 1,200 1917 

Temporary teacher. 



184 



ANNUAL KEPORTS. 



TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1920. — Continued. 

Name and Residence. 
MARTIN W. CARR SCHOOL. 
Grade. Atherton Street. 

Chas. G. Ham, Master, 20 Washburn St., Watertown 

6. Eva S. Bent,- 6 Steeves Circle 

6. Susie L. Luce, 21 Francesca Avenue 

6. Hazel N. Friend, 6 Steeves Circle 

5. 

5. Lillian T. Haskell, 41 Putnam Street 

5. Elizabeth S. Foster, 10 Cambria Street 

5. Dorothy Lundgren, 50 Harrison Street 
4. Alice M. Cumming, 117 School Street 
4. Ada C. Tassinari, 94 Beacon Street 

3. Margaret M. Brennan, 30 School Street 

3. Bessie I. Berry, 38 Wyllis Avenue, Everett 

2. Annie B. Russell, 14 Kidder Avenue 

2. Mary E. Planley, 9 Avon Street, Wakefield 

1, Frances E. Welch, 303 Highland Avenue 

1. Mabel Ingham, 62 Central Street 

(ENOCH R.) MORSE SCHOOL. 
Summer and Craigie Streets.; 

Mina J. Wendell, Master, 211-A Summer Street 

6. Mrs. Harriette C. Hamilton, 68 Wallace Street 
6, 5. Lennie W. Bartlett, 10 Cambria Street 

5. 

4. Mary A. Whitney, 10 Dow Street 

4,3. Eva A. Wilson, 9 Monmouth Street 

3. Mrs. Agnes C. Rice, 34 Highland Avenue 

2. Alice C. Ray, 169 Highland Avenue 

2. Lena Munroe, 211-A Summer Street 

1. Helen L. Tuck, 43 Paulina Street 

1. Louise Deady, 84 Bay State Avnue 





Began 




Serv- 


Salary. 


ice. 


$2,700 


1898 


1,600 


1915 


1,450 


1891 


1,450 


1915 


1,450 


1913 


1,450 


1895 


1,250 


1915 


1,200 


1917 


1,350 


191f 


1,200 


1917 


1,450 


1915 


1,450 


1901 


1,350 


1915 


1,450 


1908 


1,300 


1912 



$2,700 


1882 


1,600 


1900 


1,450 


1893 


1,450 


1916 


1,300 


1917 


1,450 


1900 


1,450 


1914 


1,450 


1913 


1,450 


1912 


1,200 


. 1917 



6. 
6, 5. 
5, 4. 
4, 3. 

3. 

2. 

1. 



GEORGE O. PROCTOR SCHOOL. 
Hudson Street. 

Harry F, Hathaway, Master, 495 Broadway 

Nora F. Byard, Principal, 27 College Avenue 

Alice G. Hosmer, 42 Boston Street 

Abbie A. Gurney, 88 Belmont Street 

Ella P. McLeod, 163 Summer Street 

Edith L. Hunnewell, 41 Mason Street 

Mary S. Richardson, 347 Boston Avenue, Medford 

Lucia Alger, 10 Cambria Street 

GEORGE W. DURELL SCHOOL. 
Beacon and Kent Streets. 

Charles G. Ham, Master, Watertown 

Abigail P. Hazelton, Principal, 9 Monmouth Street 

Grace E. Packard, 12 Carlisle Street, Roxbury 

Mary Winslow, 23 Hall Street 

Alice M. Dicker, 82 Marion Street, East Boston 

MARK F. BURNS SCHOOL. 
Cherry Street, near Highland Avenue. 

Mina J. Wendell, Master, 211-A Summer Street 
Mrs. Margaret D. Hellyar, 427 Medford Street 
Lizzie E. Hill, 121 St. Stephen Street. Boston 
Annie L. Brown, 4 Saginaw Avenue, No. Camb. 
Margaret Beattie, 401 Washington Street 
Mary E. Lacy. 63 Cherry Street 
Ardelle Abbott, 71 Craigie Street 
Alice E. Morang, 114 Belmont Street 
Ruth E. Andrews, 48 Hancock Street 



$1,600 
1,450 
1,450 
1,450 
1,450 
1,450 
1,450 



$1,550 
1,450 
1,450 
1,450 



1912 

1884 
1906 
1888 
1888 
1894 
1906 
1889 



1919 
1902 
1912 
1887 
1912 





1919 


$1,600 


1909 


1,450 


1890 


1,450 


1885 


1,350 


1914 


1,450 


1890 


1,450 


1896 


1,450 


1893 


1,400 


1917 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



185 



TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1920. — Continued. 



Name and Residence. 



Grade. 



BENJAMIN G. BROWN SCHOOL. 
Willow Avenue and Josephine Avenue. 

Geo. I. Bowden, Master, *92 Monument St., W. Med. 
J5. Maude E. Abbott, 9 Summit Avenue 

6. Mary T. Ford, 3 Linnean Street, Cambridge 
5. Annie Sanburn, 11 East Newton St., Boston 
4. Anna N, Johnson, 33 Everett Avenue 
4. Martha R. Taylor, 26 Simpson Avenue 
3. Helen L. Galvin, 1681 Beacon St., Brookline 
3. Alice M, Dorman, 159 Morrison Avenue 
2. Mrs. Grace H. Bliss, 33 Whitfield Road 
1. Mrs. Bessie T. MacCutcheon, 44 Greenville Street 
1. Olivia H. Norcross, Wilmington 





Began 




Serv- 


Salary. 


ice. 


$2,700 


1908 


1,550 


1918 


1,450 


1911 


1,450 


1906 


1,450 


1913 


1,450 


1914 


1,450 


1903 


1,450 


1903 


1.450 


1900 


1,275 


1915 


1,450 


1914 



HIGHi^aND SCHOOL. 

Highland Avenue and Grove Street. 

Harlan P. Knight, Master, 22 Hamilton Road 
6. Grace M. Clark, 10 Vernon Street, West Medford 
6. Mary H. Joyce, 42 Orchard Street, Cambridge 
6. Ethel M. Park, 48 Electric Avenue 
6. Lillian F. Richardson, 129 Mt. Auburn St., Camb. 
6. *Mrs. Lura E. Babcock, 36 Curtis Street 
5. *Mrs. Sarah K. Lake, Prospect Street, Cambridge 
5. Marion Allen, Danvers 

5. Catherine A. Burden, 166 Morrison Avenue 
5. Eva E. Perkins, 48 Astor Street, Boston 
5. Eva M. Barrows, 71 Hudson Street 
4. Hazel M. Stone, 10 Liberty Avenue 



•**••■• 


1919 


$1,600 


1893 


1,450 


1891 


1,450 


1916 


1,450 


1904 


900 


1919 


900 


1919 


1,450 


1911 


1,450 


1902 


1,450 


1911 


1,450 


1903 


1,300 


1919 



S. NEWTON CUTLER SCHOOL. 

Powder House Boulevard, near Raymond Avenue. 

Harlan P. Knight, Master, 22 Hamilton Road 

6. Bernice J. Andrews, 10 Locke Street 

6. Mrs. Edith M. Thornquist, 49 Curtis Avenue 

6. Ella H. Bucknam, 1105 Broadway 

5. Mrs. Mabel T. Totman, 17 Pleasant Avenue 

5. Georgie B. Collins, 11 Everett Street, Cambridge 

5. Bessie J. Baker, 19 Mills Street, Maiden 

4. Mrs. Elva A. Cutler, 36 Powder House Boulevard 

4. M. Eunice Young, 6 Myrtle Street, Winchester 

4. Mabel "\J^orcester, 24 Brastow Avenue 

4. Alice A. Libbey, 20 Chandler Street 

3. Mrs. Elsie M. Guthrie, 50 Bromfield Road 

3. Mary L. Ennis, 785 Broadway 

2. *Mrs. Katie L. Harmon, 18 Walker Street 

2. Inez M. Rodgers, 731 Broadway 

2. Almena J. Mansir, 77 Albion Street 

1. Annie H. Hall, 97 College Avenue 

1. Mary L. McKenna, 294 Lowell Street 

1. *Stella Bucknam, 319 Highland Avenue 



:2,700 


1897 


1,600 


1914 


1,450 


1906 


1,450 


1897 


1,450 


1893 


1,450 


1916 


1.450 


1905 


1,450 


1911 


1,450 


1912 


1,200 


1919 


1,200 


1919 


1.400 


1919 


1,450 


1915 


900 


1916 


1,450 


1915 


1,450 


1899 


1,450 


1906 


1,300 


1915 


900 


1917 



LINCOLN SCHOOL. 

Broadway, near Teele Square. 

Harlan P. Knight, Master, 22 Hamilton Road 
Eliza H. Lunt. Principal, 50 Curtis Street 
Mrs. Lillian M, Wentworth, 248 Highland Avenue 
Olevia M. Woods, 116 Powder House Boulevard 
Hortense F. Small, 91 Electric Avenue 



Temporary Teacher. 





1914 


$1,550 


1889 


1,450 


1911 


1,450 


1908 


1,450 


1912 



186 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 29. — Teachers In Service January, 1920. — Concluded. 



Name and Residence. 

MARTHA PERRY LOWE SCHOOL. 

Grade. Morrison Avenue, near Grove Street. 

George I. Bowden, Master, 92 Monument St., W. Med. 

4. May E. Small, Principal, 31 Chester Street 

4. Stella M. Holland, 7 Francesca Avenue 

3. Maude C. Valentine, 1098 Broadway 

3. Mrs. Jane M. Taaffe, 159 Morrison Avenue 

2. Katherine E. Hourahan, 94 College Avenue 

2. Clara G. Hegan, 100 School Street 

1. Martha A. Jencks, 205 Morrison Avenue 

1. Octavia A. Stewart, 15 Kenwood Street 





Began 




Serv- 


Salary. 


ice. 




1908 


$1,'600 


1900 


1,450 


1903 


1,450 


1901 


1,450 


1888 


1,450 


1892 


1,450 


1897 


1,450 


1898 


1,450 


1917 



/ENING SCHOOL PRINCIPALS. 

Everett W. Tuttle. High 
John S. Emerson, Bell 
Charles E. Brainard, Highland 



^7.00 
6.00 
6.00 



CADET TEACHERS. 

Grace M. Driscoll, 25 Arthur Street 
Laura M. Flynn, 57 Franklin Street 
Elizabeth C. Sullivan, 74 Ossipee Road 



$600 
600 
600 



191S 
1919 
1919 



12, 7. 
6, 1. 



9,1. 



6, 5. 
6, 5. 

16, 5. 



SUPERVISORS AND SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Music. 

James P. McVey, 29 Hammond Street, Cambridge '$2,500 
Mrs. Charlotte D. Lawton, 121 St. Stephen §t., Boston 1,900 



Drawing. 
Clara M. Gale, 21 Willoughby Street 

Sewing. 

Mary H. Brown, Supervisor, 5 Linnaean St. 
Mary L. Boyd, 74 Heath Street 
Mrs. Emma J. Ellis, 54 Marshall Street 
Lucy Dorr, Summer Street, cor. Laurel 



Camb. 



*$200 
1,4.50 
1,450 



9, 1. Ruth L. 



Penmanship. 
Whitehouse, 40 Highland Avenue 



Manual Tl-aining. 
Harry L, Jones, Supervisor, 137 Pow. House Blvd. 

Physical Instruction. 

$12, 1. Ernst Hermann. 9 Humbolrit Street, Cambridge 
12, 1. Alma Porter, 43 Ossipee Road 

Atypical. 

Mary A. Holt, 13 Pleasant Avenue 
Mrs. Bertha M. Morton, 62 Highland Avenue 
Julia M. Riordan, 165 Albion Street 

Supervisor School Gardens. 
tWilliam B. Moore, West Peabody 
• Additional to salary as Principal of Girls' Vocational School. 
t Additional to salary as Principal of Boys' Vocational School. 
t Part time. 



r$200 



$1,550 
1,350 



'$1,500 
1.500 
1,400 



1915 
1898 



$1,900 1911 



1913 
1888 
1900 
1919 



$1,700 1915 



1911 

1914 

1918 



1910 
1913 
1914 



U.050 1919 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



187 



TABLE 30. — OFFICERS, ETC., IN SERVICE JANUARY, 1920. 

Name and Address. 
SUPERINTENDENT AND SECRETARY 



Charles S. Clark, 75*Munroe Street 

Joseph A. Ewart, Assistant Superintendent, 11 Bigelow St. 

CLERKS. 

Mary A. Clark, 42 Highland Avenue 
Mildred A. Merrill, 26 Cambria Street 
H. Madeline Kodad, 1067 Broadway 
Arline P. Hall, 189 Pearl Street 

ATTENDANCE OFFICERS. 

Justin W. Lovett, 18 Waldo Street 
Benjamin R. Jones, 25 Loring- Street 



Salary. 

$4,200 
3,000 



$1,200 

1,050 

18.00 per wk. 

13.00 per wk. 



$1,500 
1,500 



TABLE 31. — SCHOOL JANITORS, JANUARY, 1920. 



School. 

High School, assistant 

High School, assistant 

High School, assistant 

High School, assistant 

Eastern Junior High 

Prescott 

Hanscom 

Boys' Vocational 

Bennett 

Baxter 

Knapp 

Perry 

Pope 

Bell 

Southern Junior High 

Cummings 

Edgerly 

Glines 

Forster 

Northern Junior High 

Bingham 

Carr 

Morse 

Proctor 

Durell 

Burns 

Brown 

Highland 

Hodgkins 

Western Junior High 

Cutler 

Lincoln 

Lowe 



Name. 

Jeremiah M. Brennan 
John N. Quirk 
Nicholas J. Lacey 
Andrew H. Finnegan 
James J. Quirk 
John T. Morey 
Charles F. Rose 
Charles B. Kelley 
Michael Mullaney 
Jeremiah Sullivan 
Maurice T. Mullins 
Dan'l E. Cunningham 
John J. Kilty 
William Meskill 
Joseph F. McCormack 
Lewis G. Keene 
Charles P. Horton 
Roy C. Burckes 
George W. Coombs 
Thomas G. Pullen 
John F. O'Brien 
John H. Lane 
John W. Cremen 
James F. Flynn 
Ellsworth C. Lundgren 
Charles J. Elkins 
James J. Cooper 
E. Parker Cook 
George A. Givan 
James T. Eddy 
Daniel Campbell 
Thomas F. O'Day 
Frank H. Flagg 





Weekly 


Residence. 


Salary 


482 Medford St. 


$21.00 


202 Somerville Ave. 


21.00 


85 Franklin St. 


26.00 


94 Concord Ave. 


20.00 


321/2 Tufts St. 


23.50 


18 Howe St. 


24.50 


15 Brastow Ave. 


22.50 


25 Clark St. 


22.00 


467 Somerville Ave. 


24.00 


16 Newton St. 


20.00 


13 Fremont St. 


20.00 


23 Fitchburg St. 


20.00 


662 Somerville Ave. 


24.00 


53 Partridge Ave. 


26.00 


206 Washington St. 


21.00 


54 Prescott St. 


17.50 


22 Everett Ave. 


24.00 


20 Jacques St. 


25.00 


73 Bonair St. 


24.00 


6 Madison St. 


23.50 


347 Lowell St. 


27.00 


5-A Belmont St. 


30.00 


69 Oxford St. 


24.50 


31 Linden St. 


21.50 


50 Harrison St. 


17.50 


35 Mansfield St. 


21.50 


105 Willow Ave. 


22.50 


103 Willow Ave. 


24.00 


17 Henry Ave. 


25.00 


38 Wallace St. 


27.00 


85 Lexington Ave. 


24.00 


134 Lowell St. 


17.50 


22 Clyde St. 


21.50 



188 ANNUAL REPORTS, 



OUTLINE OF THE ORGANIZATION AND ACTIVITIES OF THE 
SCHOOLS UNDER THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

School Buildings. 

The High School on Central Hill consists of the East and 
the West buildings. 

The South worth Building and a portion of the Prescott 
building adjoining are used by the Eastern Junior High School. 
The Folsom building and a part of the Forster building, at 
AVinter Hill, are used by the Northern Junior High School. 
The Bell School building on Vinal Avenue is occupied by the 
Southern Junior High organization ; and a new building on the 
ledge lot on Holland street, in West Somerville, and also the 
Hodgkins building on the same street are used by the Western 
Junior High School. 

The Davis School building on Tufts Street, with two addi- 
tional structures connected therewith, is occupied by the Voca- 
tional School for Boys. 

The elementary schools are conducted in the following 
buildings : Bennett, Hanscom, Edgerly, Glines, Bingham, 
Proctor, Brown, Lowe, Lincoln, Cutler, Highland, Burns, 
Morse, Carr, Durell, Cummings, Perry, Baxter, Knapp and 
Pope. A few rooms in the Prescott and Forster buildings are 
used for elementary purposes also. 

In the Annual Report of the School Committee of 1907 is 
found a full statement regarding the school houses in Somer- 
ville up to that time. In 1842, when Somerville became an in- 
dependent town, five small buildings accommodating 247 pupils 
provided for all school needs. Even the names of these schools 
sound strange today, for they were known as the "Pound Prim- 
ary, Winter Hill Primary, Milk Row Primary, Prospect Hill 
Primary, and Prospect Hill Grammar". School buildings have 
been constructed, outgrown, and in many cases converted into 
dwelling houses. A statement follows regarding buildings now 
in use: 

High School. 

The Somerville High School was first opened on Central 
Hill May 3, 1852, in a building which now forms a part of the 
City Hall. In 1872 the present Latin or East building of the 
High School was occupied. The English High School buUding, 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 189 

now known as the West building, was constructed in 1895. In 
1906 an addition to the Latin School gave only temporary re- 
lief. In 1913 wings were added to the West building, the two 
buildings were connected, and an assembly hall provided. 

In the spring of 1919, the School Committee unanimously 
adopted a recommendation submitting to the Mayor and the 
Board of Aldermen a comprehensive program of school con- 
struction. This program includes a gymnasium building for 
the High School, to be thoroughly equipped with all the ap- 
purtenances that belong therewith. 



Junior High Schools. 

The Prescott School, on Pearl Street, East Somerville, 
which is now occupied in part by the Eastern Junior High 
School and in part by the Prescott Elementary School, was 
built in 1867, containing ten rooms and a hall which was soon 
divided into classrooms. The Southworth building, occupied 
entirely by the Eastern Junior High School was built in 1916 
and contains nine classrooms besides a cooking room and a 
small assembly room in the basement. A covered passagewaj^ 
connects it with the Prescott building. The second unit, con- 
sisting of a duplicate of the present building, constructed in 
the rear thereof, will form a square, the center of which will be 
occupied b}^ the third unit, to include gymnasium and assembly 
hall. 

The present Forster School house was built in 1867. As 
happened in the case of the Prescott School, so in this building 
the assembly hall was in 1883 divided into classrooms. The 
Folsom building, which is connected by a covered passageway 
with the Forster School, was built in 1899. It contains six 
classrooms besides two rooms in the basement which are used, 
one for a woodworking shop and the other for a print shop. 
Unused space on the third floor has been partitioned off by the 
boys of the school into rooms that are now used for drawing, 
typewriting, sewing, and cooking. The use of this floor for 
these purposes should be regarded as only a temporary expe- 
dient. 

The building program calls for the erection on another 
site of a building constructed for Junior High School purposes 
exclusively, and of sufficient size to remove the Northern Junior 
High School entirely from its present quarters. As in the case 
of the other Junior High Schools, this building is to contain 
gymnasium and assembly hall. This will release the Forster 
and the Folsom buildings for elementary school uses. 

The Hodgkins building on Holland street. West Somer- 
ville, was built in 1896. It contains twelve large and two small 



190 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

classrooms. The Junior High School building on the ledge lot 
on Holland street was completed in 1917. It contains eleven 
classrooms, besides four large basement rooms devoted to cook- 
ing, sewing, metal working, and wood working. Like the 
Southworth building at East Somerville, this building is the 
first unit of a three unit building, the plan calling for a dupli- 
cation of the present building, thus completing a hollow square, 
the center of which is to be filled in by construction that will 
provide an assembly hall and a gymnasium. The location of 
this building upon the ledge lot, so-called, gives an exceptional 
opportunity for making adequate provision for the development 
of out-door activities that are properly associated with a com- 
plete junior high school organization. 

Elementary Schools. 

The present Bennett School on Poplar Street, East Som- 
erville, containing twelve rooms, was built in 1902. 

The Hanscom Schoolhouse on Webster Street was erected 
in 1 897 with six rooms, to which four were added in 1907. 

The Edgerly School on Cross Street was built in 1871 con- 
taining four rooms. Four rooms were added in 1882 and four 
more in 1892. 

The Glines School on Jacques Street was built in 1891 con- 
taining eight rooms, to which five were added in 1896. 

The Bingham School on Lowell Street, containing four 
rooms, built in 1886, was enlarged in 1894 by the addition of 
four rooms and again in 1904 by adding eight rooms. 

The Proctor Schoolhouse on Hudson Street containing 
nine rooms was built in 1905. 

The Brown School on Willow Avenue erected in 1901 and 
containing six rooms, was enlarged by the addition of four 
rooms in 1907. 

The Lowe School on Morrison x\venue was erected in 1903 
with eight rooms. 

The Lincoln Schoolhouse on Broadway near Teele Square 
was built in 1885. 

The Cutler School of twelve rooms was built on Powder 
House Boulevard in 1912. To it six rooms were added in 1915. 
The original plans provide for a still further enlargement of 
this building. 

The Highland School of eight rooms, built in 1880, was en- 
larged by the addition of four rooms in 1891. 

The Burns School on Cherry Street was built in 1886.^ Its 
original provision of foiir rooms was increased by the addition 
of another four in 1899. 

The Morse School on Summer Street was built in 1869 con- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 191 

taining four rooms aud a hall. In 1880 the latter was divided 
into classrooms. In 1889 an addition of six rooms was made. 

The Carr School on Beech Street containing seventeen 
rooms was erected in 1898. 

The Durell School on Kent Street containing four rooms 
was built in 1894. 

The Cummings School of four rooms was built on School 
Street in 1884. 

The Perry School on Washington Street was constructed 
in 1899. It contains six rooms. 

The Baxter School on Bolton Street with six rooms was 
built in 1901. 

The Knapp School on Concord Avenue, originally consist- 
ing of eight rooms, was built in 1889. To it four rooms were 
added in 1894 

The Pope School on Washington Street containing twelve 
rooms was occupied in 1891. 

School Organization. 

The school organization is made up as follows : , 

The School Committee. 

The administration oflpce, consisting of superinten- 
dent, assistant superintendent, four clerks, two attendance 
officers ; 

The High School, containing 1618 pupils December 
1,1919; 

Four junior high schools containing 2937 pupils; 

Vocational School for Boys, 74 pupils ; 

Vocational School for Girls, 21 pupils ; 

Twenty-two elementary schools including four kin- 
dergartens, three atypical classes and one non-English-speaking 
class, totalling 8517 pupils. 

• Supervision. 

Responsibilities of supervision and administration are 
vested in the following : superintendent, assistant superinten- 
dent, principal of the High School, principals of four junior 
high schools, nine supervising principals of elementary schools, 
two principals of vocational schools, supervisor of manual arts 
for boys, supervisor of household arts for girls, music super- 
visor for high and junior high schools, music supervisor for 
elementary schools, supervisors of drawing, penmanship, phy- 
sical training with one assistant, and supervisor of school gar- 
dens. 



192 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

School Committee. 

The School Committee consists of sixteen members, two 
elected from each of the seven wards, wdth the Mayor and the 
President of the Board of Aldermen members ex-ofliciis. Inas- 
much as elections are biennial, beginning with 1919, the entire 
School Committee is chosen at one time. The Commissioner 
of Public Buildings has control of school janitors, and the erec- 
tion, repairs, and maintenance of school buildings. There are 
seven Standing Committees of the School Board, namely, Fi- 
nance; Text Books and Courses of Study; Industrial Educa- 
tion ; School Accommodations ; Teachers' ; Health, Physical 
Training, and Athletics; and Rules and Regulations. The 
School Board meets regularly- on the last Monday evening ot 
the calendar month. 

High School. 

Until September 1918 thirteen years comprised the school 
course. At that time the course was reduced bv one vear in 
harmony with the prevailing educational practice. The ele- 
mentary^ -course of six years is followed by a course of three 
years in the junior high school, and then by three in the High 
School. Thus the tenth, eleventh, and twelfth years of the 
pupils' life are spent in the high school. The courses offered 
are college, scientific, normal, general, and commercial. Pu- 
pils are distributed among the several courses as follows: 



College . 




21.1 per cent 


Scientific 




15.8 " 


Normal . 




3.5 " . " 


General . 




11.4 " 


Commercial 




48.2 " 



In September 1919 ninety-five pupils from this school en- 
tered higher institutions. 

The change from a course of thirteen years to one of twelve 
years has produced an abnormally large class in the first of the 
three years of the high school. This class now includes those 
pupils who entered school at the age of five and have taken ten 
years to reach this point, and also those who, entering at the 
age of six, have taken nine years. 

The high school publishes a monthly paper entitled the 
^'Radiator," has a large school orchestra, a school drum corps, 
debating teams, an athletic association represented by teams 
in the Suburban League, glee clubs, and a system of physical 
training with principles of military practice organized under 
pupil leadership. The same system of physical training is 
maintained in each of the junior high schools, pupils trained as 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 193 

leaders conducting the exercises in the several schools. The 
high school, as well as all the junior high schools, maintains a 
successful lunch system operated in large measure by the 
pupils. 

Junior High Schools. 

In 1914: junior high school work was begun in an experi- 
mental way at the Forster School at Winter Hill. It involved 
the highest grades only of that grammar school. In 1916 the 
School Committee adopted the plan of junior high schools for 
the entire city, to be introduced gradually. In accordance with 
that action, the June graduates of the Glines, Bingham, an.d 
Forster Schools were assembled in the Forster School. These, 
together with the last two years of the grammar school, now 
constituted the Northern Junior High School. Space in this 
building was obtained for this school by transferring elemen- 
tary pupils to the Bingham, Proctor, and Glines buildings. 

At the same time, September 1916, the completion of the 
Southworth building in East Somerville made possible the es- 
tablishment of the Eastern Junior High School in that build- 
ing and a part of the Prescott building. These changes in- 
volved the Prescott, Edgerly, and Pope schools. 

In September 1917, the completion of the new building on 
Holland Street, West Somerville, made possible the establish- 
ment of the Western Junior High School, occupying the whole 
of that building and the Hodgkins building located nearby. 
This change involved pupils in the Brown, Highland, Hodgkins, 
and Cutler schools. 

In September 1918 the addition to the Bell School on Vinal 
Avenue provided the space necessary for the establishment of 
the Southern, the fourth and last junior high school. This 
change affected the Carr, Morse, Bell and Knapp schools. 

In order to give the closest possible connection between the 
Junior High and Senior High Schools, monthly conferences 
are held in each subject of the third year of the junior high 
school. These conferences involve the head of that department 
in the high school, the masters of the junior high schools, and 
the teachers of that subject in the junior high schools. 

Each junior high school maintains its own orchestra of 
pupils, doing work of high order in many cases. Some of the 
schools have emphasized public speaking in various ways and 
debating societies are in successful operation. One school has 
begun the publication of a bi-weekly school paper. War inter- 
ests have been emphasized in the junior high schools and the 
fullest advantage taken of the enthusiasm and activity that is 
so much in evidence at the junior high school age. 



194 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

« 

Opportunities are multiplied for the assumption of respon- 
sibility by individual pupils or by groups of pupils. Leaders 
are chosen from the several junior high school rooms and they 
are given bi-weekly instruction by the physical training teach- 
ers at the State Armory. Returning to their schools, these pu- 
pils carry their instruction into effect with their own class- 
mates. Periodically the classes which are judged to be the 
most successful in each junior high school meet at the State- 
Armory to compete before discriminating judges. These con- 
tests are stimulating and are entered into in the spirit of true 
sportsmanship. 

In the junior high schools the habit of saving is encouraged 
by maintenance of a school bank in which the pupils themselves 
are tellers and accountants. The funds are kept on deposit in 
the Somerville Institution for Savings. 

In each school several hundred books upon pertinent sub- 
jects are deposited by the public library. This school library 
is managed b}^ the pujjils of the school. 

The programme of studies of the first and second years in- 
cludes the academic work formerly provided in the last two 
years of grammar school with somewhat larger attention to 
manual arts education. In addition opportunity for discover- 
ing individual aptitudes and inclinations is provided in the 
choice of one of several electives. These at present comprise 
Latin, French, Spanish, beginnings of commercial work witJi 
typewriting, additional work in household or manual arts. 
Classes are provided also for such pupils as wish to intensify 
the ordinar}^ grammar school subjects in place of these elec- 
tives. 

The third year of the programme of studies is practically 
identical with the work formerly offered in the freshman class 
of the high school. In this year of the course, pupils are 
grouped as follows : College, Scientific, Normal, Manual Arts, 
Household Arts, and Commercial. 

Cooking and sewing constitute a large part of the work in 
household arts, while for the boys carpentry is taught in all 
schools, together with metal-working in the Southern and the 
Western, book-binding in the Eastern and printing in the 
Northern. The Junior High School curriculum is given in 
full in the 1918 report of the School Committee. 

Promotion from the elementary schools to the junior high 
school is given to such pupils as have obtained passing marks in 
their work. In addition any others whose individual interests 
may be better served by the special work, particularly of a man- 
ual character, offered in the junior high school, are transferred 
thereto. Promotion from the junior high to the senior high 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 195 

school is given to all such pupils as appear able to take up the 
work of the high school with profit to themselves. 

Careful consideration is now being given to the various 
courses of study in the junior high schools, committees of 
teachers being engaged in this work. It is expected that it 
will be completed soon and in form for use at the opening 
of schools in September. 

The Annual Reports of the School Committee have dealt 
with the subject of the junior high school each year since 1911. 
The reports of 1914, 1916, 1918, and 1919 present an especially 
full discussion of this unit of our school organization. 

Elementary Schools. 

The elementary schools include kindergartens and six ele- 
mentary grades. In order to serve the interests of the various 
localities the better the schools show some variation in the 
number of grades, as will be seen from the summary that ap- 
pears later. The establishment of junior high schools has cre- 
ated a much more favorable condition for classes in elementary 
work, by relieving in large measure over-crowdedness in the 
elementary schools. While promotions are made annually in 
June, in all schools, individual adjustments take place at any 
time through the year when the interests of the children 
will be better served thereby. 

Vocational Schools. 

The Vocational Schools for Boys and for Girls are both 
state-aided and are patronized by pupils from Somerville and 
adjoining communities. The former is now favorably situated 
for carrying on its three departments of woodworking, machine 
work, and automobile repairing. The Girls^ Vocational School 
has, in common with other schools of like nature, suffered a loss 
in numbers in the last two or three years. 

The Vocational School for Boys occupies the Davis School 
building which was built in 1884, containing four rooms. To 
it was added, in 1917, a building containing a machine shop 
and in 1918 another building for an automobile repair shop. 
Provision is now being made, in co-operation with the Federal 
Government, for special training for returned soldiers. 

The Vocational School for Girls from 1911 to 1919 occu- 
pied a dwelling-house on Atherton Street. In the fall of 1919 
this building was closed, and the school transferred to its pres- 
ent quarters in the High School building. 

Graduates of these schools find immediate employment in 
the trades for which they have been prepared. 



196 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

c 

Atypical Classes. 

Three classes are maintained for pupils who are seriously 
retarded in their school work and are therefore out of adjust- 
ment with their ordinary classes. In such classes instruction 
is given of a special character in elementary school subjects 
and also in manual subjects. The membership of each class is 
limited to fifteen. Such pupils are assigned to these classes as 
may fairly be expected to profit therefrom, and in many cases 
they secure adjustment to the ordinarj- classes. The educa- 
tional interests of the city will be very materially furthered 
when the number of atypical classes is increased. By Legisla- 
tive act of 1919 the establishment of such classes will now be 
required throughout the state. 

Kindergartens. 

There are four kindergartens, maintained respectively in 
the Bennett, Hanscom, Glines and Baxter Schools. This num- 
ber is inadequate to provide for all sections of the city. An 
extension, therefore, of the kindergarten privilege to cover other 
portions of Somerville not now provided for is under considera- 
tion. 

Elementary School Districts. 

The supervision of all schools below the junior high schools 
is vested in nine supervising principals, each in charge of one 
of the following districts : 

Edgerly and Glines ; Bennett ; Knapp, Baxter, and Perry ; 
Hanscom and Pope; Bingham and Proctor; Brown and Lowe; 
Morse and Burns; Carr, Cummings and Durell; Cutler, High- 
land and Lincoln. The principals of the Eastern and the 
Northern Junior High Schools have supervision of the Prescott 
and the Forster elementary schools respectively. 

Summary. 

The organization of these educational units may be sum 
marized in the following statement : 
High School — Grades 10, 11, and 12. 
Eastern Section: 

Eastern Junior High School — Grades 7 to 9 

Edgerly School, grades 1 to 6 

Pope School, grades 1 to 6 

Prescott School, grades 1 to 4 

Hanscom School, grades 1 to 5 

Bennett School, grades 1 to 5 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 197 

Northern Section : 

Northern Junior High School — Grades 7 to 9 
Glines School, grades 1 to 6 
Forster School, grades 1 to 6 
Bingham School, grades 1 to 6 
Proctor School, grades 1 to 6 

Southern Section : 

Southern Junior High School — Grades 7 to 9 

Knapp School, grades 1 to 6 

Carr School, grades 1 to 6 

Morse School, grades 1 to 6 

Perry School, grades 1 to 6 

Baxter School, grades 1 to 5 

Cummings School, grades 1 to 4 

Durell School, grades 1 to 4 

Western Section: 

Western Junior High School — Grades 7 to 9 

Brown School, grades 1 to 6 

Cutler School, grades 1 to 6 

Highland School, grades 4 to 6 

Burns School, grades 1 to 4 

Lowe School, grades 1 to 4 

Lincoln School, grades 1 to 3 

Kindergartens — Hanscom, Bennett, Baxter, and Glines Schools 

Atypical Classes — Bennett, Knapp, and Highland Schools 

Vocational School for Boys 

Vocational School for Girls. 

Health. 

The Health interests of the children are given careful con- 
sideration in a variety of ways. In 1910 a school dental dis- 
pensary was opened through the co-operation of the local den- 
tists. In 1912 the work of this dispensary was assumed by the 
School Committee. It is located in the Proctor School on Hud- 
son Street with a dentist and an assistant in charge and is ren- 
dering a valuable service to the children of the city. 

A matron has recently been appointed in the high school. 
Her duties are in general the safeguarding of all the interests 
of the girls in that school. By the co-operation with the Board 
of Health, the schools have the services of two school nurses 
and eight medical inspectors. 



198 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Continu«ation Schools. 

By a referendum vote, the citizens last November accepted 
the legislative act which provides for the institution and main- 
tenance of continuation schools. Such a school will be organ- 
ized at the opening of the school year in September 1920. It 
will, by the provisions of the law, be a beneficiary of State-aid. 
This school provides for four days of school instruction weekly 
for all children under sixteen years of age employed under 
working certificates or home permits. 

Manual Training. 

In addition to the vocational instruction provided in the 
two vocational schools, manual training of a more general sort 
is given in the high school, the four junior high schools, and in 
all sixth grades. In the high school, the work deals with car- 
pentry, and joinery, cabinet making, wood turning, pattern 
making, metal spinning, foundry work, forging, sheet metal 
work, tinsmithing, plumbing, gas fitting, steam fitting, machine 
work, electrical work, lock smithing, study of gasoline engines, 
and general repair work. Instruction is provided for boys in 
the junior high schools in addition to woodworking as follows : 
In the Eastern, bookbinding; in the Southern and Western, 
metal working ; in the Northern, printing. In all of these shops 
the work is of a practical sort, but is not intended to fit directly 
for the trade. Whittling is taught to all boys of the sixtii 
grades. Sewing is given in the sixth grade and is continued as 
a required subject in the seventh and eighth grades, and as an 
elective also throughout the junior high school and the high 
school. Cooking is required of all girls in the seventh and 
eighth grades, and this also may be taken as an elective 
throughout the junior high school and the high school. The 
lunch rooms previously referred to are maintained in connec- 
tion with this work and are self-supporting. 

Co-operation of Public Library. 

In addition to the maintenance of large deposits of books 
in the junior high schools as elsewhere mentioned, the public 
library sends to each teacher of the elementary schools fifty 
books each year, largely of the teacher's choosing as best suited 
to her interests. The public library also pays one-half of the 
salary of the librarian of the high school. In all probability, 
few communities have as effective co-operation between the pub- 
lic schools and the public library as that with which our city 
is favored. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 199 

School Gardens. 

Throughout the year interest is maintained through the 
schools in school and home gardens. The planning and super- 
vision of this work is vested in a garden supervisor, who, being 
a practical farmer and one who understands and can enthuse 
children, has broadened out the work each year and has 
brought it to a high degree of efficiency. In addition to garden- 
ing, a large interest has been aroused in canning and in poul- 
try raising, in which, in state competitions, our pupils have won 
first and second prizes the past two years. 

Parent-Teacher Associations. 

Recognizing the fact that the efficiency of the schools can 
be materially increased by the maintenance of sympathetic re- 
lations between home and the school, there are parent-teacher 
associations organized in most of the schools. In many cases 
these associations are a large influence toward a better under- 
standing of school problems. While the principal of the school 
is in each case the president of such an association, the other 
officers are chosen from the body of parents as well as of 
teachers. 

School Savings Bank System. 

In 1912 a school bank system of savings was adopted for 
use in our schools. Through the co-operation of the Somerville 
Institution for Savings a ver}^ carefully devised and efficient 
system was established. Under the operation of this system 
many children became regular depositors in the school savings 
bank, and accumulated substantial accounts in the Institu- 
tion for Savings. During the period of the war the operation 
of the savings banks was interrupted temporarily and the chil- 
dren put their savings into Thrift and War Savings stamps. 
In this undertaking the habits of saving already established 
led to a liberal purchase of War Savings stamps. In the fall 
of 1919 the principals of the schools decided to resume the op 
eration of the school savings bank. In their opinion this sys- 
tem was more advantageous for the pupils of the city than 
would be the continuance of the purchase of War Savings 
stamps. The system as now operated provides for a school bank 
in each school building, which receives the deposits of pupils 
and transfers them to the Somerville Institution for Savings. 
A pupil may deposit in the school savings bank any sum of 
money which he is able to save. When he has a credit of three 
dollars he is entitled to receive a bank book. His money then 
goes on interest and thereafter his deposits are credited in his 
bank book. 



200 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Americanization. 

The character of the population of Somerville makes the 
need of Americanization work less than would naturally be 
expected in so large a city. However, several classes in Amer- 
icanization are conducted afternoons and evenings under the 
direction of the School Committee, and the number will be in- 
creased as conditions warrant. Classes are provided for both 
men and women. 



Supervised Play and Organized Playgrounds. 

In the elementary schools, organized play has become a 
prominent feature. The recess has become a most valuable part 
of the daily program. For several years, field days have been 
held just before the close of the school year to exemplify this 
work in the schools. The large attendance of parents and citi- 
zens upon these exercises is convincing proof of their endorse- 
ment. 

Summer playgrounds, which were for several years under 
the direction of the School Committee, are now controlled by 
the Recreation and Playground Commission. In the work of 
this commission, the School authorities bear an important part. 
In the summer of 1919 8 playgrounds were conducted over 
the city, involving the employment of 15 supervisors and in- 
structors. As the interests of the school gardens and the sum- 
mer playgrounds are closely related, the Recreation and Play- 
ground Commission bears a portion of the expense of the sal- 
ary of the garden supervisor. 

Summer School. 

No summer school is maintained under the control of the 
School Committee. In the Y. M. C. A. building, however, one 
is conducted for six weeks, affording opportunity for help to 
those pupils who hope to regain a lost promotion or to obtain a 
special promotion. The teachers in this school are chosen from 
the public schools and work in harmony with the school ad- 
ministration. Their recommendations regarding the promotion 
of their pupils are, in the main, carried out at the opening of 
schools in September. In almost all cases their recommenda- 
tions prove wise. 

Evening Schools. 

Evening schools are maintained as follows for twenty 
weeks, beginning early in October : 

High School on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings, 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 201 

in the high school building. Classes are conducted in algebra, 
bookkeeping, chemistry, commercial arithmetic, English litera- 
ture, Spanish, penmanship, stenography, typewriting, free-hand 
drawing, mechanical drawing, architectural drawing and civil 
service. 

The Bell Elementary School on Vinal Avenue and the 
Highland Elementary School on Highland Avenue, on Monday, 
Tuesday, Thursday and Friday evenings. These schools are 
intended for those students who have not yet completed work 
that would admit them to the high school. 

Practical Arts classes for men and boys in the Vocational 
School for Boys on Tufts Street, with classes in machine, shop 
practice and automobile repairing. 

Practical Arts classes for women in the High School build- 
ing on Central Hill, in the Western Junior High School on 
Holland Street, and in the Bingham School on Lowell Street, 
with classes in millinery and dressmaking. The teachers of all 
these evening classes are carefully chosen because of a particu- 
lar fitness for the subjects they are to teach. 

Conclusion. 

AVhile the schools of the city have continued adequate in- 
struction along the established lines, yet the best thought has 
been concentrated upon them in order that they might meet the 
changing requirements of education. That our schools in their 
early introduction of measures to meet the individual needs are 
in harmony with the best educational thinking is amply at- 
tested by the fact that these provisions have now been incor- 
porated into most school systems by legislative enactment or 
by voluntary action of the school authorities. 



202 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



PUBLIC UBRARY. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Thomas M. Durell, President. 

J. Frank Wellington, Vice-President. 

Frederick W. Parker. Herbert E. Buffum, M. D. 

William L. Barber. Giles W. Bryant, M. D. 

Charles L. Notes, D. D. DA\^D H. Fulton. 

Vacancy. 



COMMITTEES. 

On Administration. 

The President, Messrs. Wellington, Parker, Noyes, and Fulton. 

On Books and Cataloguing. 
The President, Messrs. Barber, Buffum, and Bryant. 

On Buildings and Property. 
The President and the Vice-President. 



Secretary of the Board. 
George H. Evans. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 203 

ORGANIZATION OF LIBRARY AND STAFF PERSONNEL. 

December 31, 1919. 

George Hill Evans, Librarian. 

Nellie M. Whipple, Assistant Librarian. 

Vivian J. Morse, Executive Assistant. 



CENTRAL LIBRARY AND LIBRARIAN'S OFFICE. 

Highland Avenue and Walnut Street. 

GRADED SERVICE. 

Department Heads and Special Positions. 

Edith B. Hayes, Chief Cataloguer. 

Cora B. Eames, Reference Librarian. 

Mart S. Woodman, Reviewer and Classifier. 

Anna L. Stone, Periodicals. 

Edythe L. Miller, High School Librarian. 

Gladys B. Hastings, Children's Librarian. 

Abbie G. Glover, Librarian of Graded and Junior High Schools. 

Senior Assistants. 

Myrtle Nicholson, Desk Chief. 
Helen P. Smith, Assistant Cataloguer. 

Nina L. Winn, Circulation Dep't. 
Ruth L. Swett, Circulation Dep't. 

Junior Assistants. 
Jessie B. Alcock, Circulation Dep't. 

UNGRADED SERVICE. 

Marion L. Fall, Catalogue Dep't. 
Lillian McGowan, Circulation Dep't. 

Attendants on Part Time. 

Leila Beardsley Caroline Comey Marion Dow 

Ruth Hayes Carroll Hill Louise Joyce 

Bebnice Watt Paul Parker 



204 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 

WEST SOMERVILLE BRANCH. 

Established 1909. 
40 College Avenue. 



GRADED SERVICE. 

Esther M. Mayhew, Branch Librarian. 
Mabel E. Bunker, 1st Assistant. 



Harriet Fenwick 



Junior Assistants. 



Dorothy L. Kinney 



Marjorie Cole 
V/iLBUR Stanley 



UNGRADED SERVICE. 
Mae L. Gormley, Page. 

Attendants on Part Time. 



Eleanor A. Randall 
Richard Walsh 



Lillian Trask 



EAST SOMERVILLE BRANCH. 

Established 1912. 
Broadway and Illinois Avenue. 

GRADED SERVICE. 

Beatrice E. Kelliher, Branch Librarian. 

Senior Assistants. 
Ruth S. Fales, 1st Assistant. 

Junior Assistants. 
Ruth Burckes, Circulation. 



Doris Gerritson 
Gladys Murley 



UNGRADED SERVICE. 
Attendants on Part Time. 

Gertrude McGlinchy 
Cecile McDonald 






PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

UNION SQUARE BRANCH. 

Establislied 1912. 
Washington Street and Bonner Avenue. 

GRADED SERVICE. 

Mildred R. Holt, Branch Librarian. 

Senior Assistants. 

Ruth G. Markle, Children's Librarian. 
Marguerite C. Kelly, Circulation. 



UNGRADED SERVICE. 

Attendants on Part Time. 
Bessie Berman. EL\^A A. Spaulding 



205 



NOTE: For changes in staff personnel during the year see Librarian's 
Report. 



206 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Report of the Trustees. 



To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen : — The forty-seventh annual report of the trus- 
tees of the public library is herewith respectfully submitted; 
being the report of the librarian and tables of statistics of 
operation. 

Very respectfully, 

The Board of Trustees, by 

Thomas M. Durell, 

President. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 207 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 

Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees: 

The forty-seventh annual report of the Somerville Public 
Library, for the year 1919, is herewith submitted, a record of 
the largest yearns work in the history of the library. 

The outstanding feature of the year has been the effect 
of business competition that has lured librarians away from the 
profession into other more lucrative employments. Business 
has discovered that library training not only makes accurate 
and efficient workers, but that it is also a selective process that 
weeds out undesirable personality. Librarians and Trustees 
have observed with alarm the perfectly logical operation of 
this competitive demand. Powerless in most cases to combat 
it, they now find themselves face to face with an alarming de- 
ficit in the supply of library workers. This shortage has also 
induced an unfortunate condition of competition between in- 
stitutions, which, though an inevitable process of economic 
law, is none the less disturbing. The plain conclusion is that 
those municipalities that fail to recognize these signs of the 
times, and safeguard their library personnel by adequate sal- 
ary increases, will suffer a decline from their previous stand- 
ards of service. The process is already under way. The occa- 
sional institution that has sufficient freedom to act with 
promptness will emerge from the crisis with a notable increase 
of strength. Here and there one, having the vision, gives evi- 
dence also of freedom and initiative in self -protection. 

Our library has had its share of these perplexities. Yet 
they have not been without their compensations. Through all 
these trying times there has been within the ranks of the staff 
a gratifying spirit of loyalty. Those who have left us have 
gone with evident regret. The sore need of relief from economic 
strain, or the invitation to step forward, has dictated the ac- 
ceptance of opportunities in other fields. Happily we have not 
had to endure the depressing atmosphere of complaint. For 
this patient loyalty, this spirit of courageous cheerfulness, that 
has made and kept the associations of the daily routine full 
of pleasure, the librarian expresses his gratitude and profound 
admiration. 

To tlie growing conception of librarianship as a profes- 
sion this fine spirit is in large measure due. It may be profita- 
ble to point out to our citizens what this means to librarians 
and to the library service. First of all it is necessary to dis- 
abuse the mind of any confusion between professionalism and 
commercialism. The unfortunate use of the words professional 
and |)rofessionalism, as applied to the commercialization of ath- 



208 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

letic sports, has established a popular conception entirely 
foreign to the terms as understood by librarians. Professional 
librarianship means first of all fitness of the individual through 
a liberal education to which has been added specialized train- 
ing and mental discipline. Its practise is marked by the men- 
tal attitude of the worker toward his calling as first of all a 
career, and only secondarily a means of livelihood. The pro- 
fessional librarian seeks certain rewards entirely outside the 
domain of commercial values. He deems essential to his hap- 
piness a large measure of freedom for self expression, an at- 
mosphere of congenial associations, personal and cultural. He 
values highly the opportunity to make his contribution to the 
progress of society, and perhaps to win a share of public 
esteem. The day's work, therefore, he does not do primarily 
for the day's wage to end with the day, but with a pride of 
workmanship in a continuous creative process, the building of 
the larger structure of a life. Organized librarianship seeks 
to promote and maintain uniformity and excellence of stand- 
ards through discussions, the press, legislation, and specialized 
training courses. It urges the universality of the library's cul- 
tural mission as opposed to the provincialism and stagnation of 
the library position as a local '^job." Recognition of the profes- 
sional idea by the institution leads to the adoption of cultural 
standards, and to appointment and promotion for fitness, 
rather than for political, geographical, or similar non-intel- 
lectual reasons of temporary expediency. Such ideals and re- 
wards, and the long look ahead, undoubtedly do contribute 
toward a tranquil spirit in trying times. 

Your librarian believes, and this library consistently prac- 
tices, the doctrine that it is the birthright and duty of librari- 
ans everywhere, when opportunity offers, to make such changes 
of employment as promise professional growth. Only by devel- 
opment of the individual can the vitality of our profession be 
maintained. New blood and new contacts are the anti-toxin to 
stagnation and provincialism. Even though one library for 
the moment suffers a loss, all libraries and the cause of educa- 
tion and good citizenship in the end benefit. We therefore 
believe that our losses that have meant progress for the in- 
dividual are in the larger view a gain. 

For the first time in the history of the library the total re- 
corded home circulation has passed the 500,000 mark. We 
have no reliable means of estimating the amount of use within 
the walls of the 10,000 books in the 161 rooms of our schools. 
The testimony of the teachers shows it to be extensive. The 
recorded loans from school rooms for home use are 63,865. 
These are truly "books at work." There is an insistent cry from 
the teachers for more books. Double the number could be 



rUBLIC LIBRARY. 20') 

put into immediate circulation. No department of the library 
brings in better returns, nor shows so great economy of opera- 
tion. The school is the only agency through which the entire 
child poj)ulatiou can be reached. Through this means we 
achieve 100 per cent, publicity for the library 'as a public educa- 
tional institution to be supported as a matter of course by the 
coming generation. 

Our Reference department has been busier than ever. In 
round numbers 64,000 questions, asked by all sorts of people 
who had problems to solve, were answered by the library, — 
an average of over two hundred and ten a day. These ques- 
tions reflect the life of the people from every angle. They 
vary all the way from such a simple question as "When was 
President Wilson born?'' to a demand for detailed informa- 
tion about the Parana river of South America. The follow- 
ing questions answered in our Reference department, taken 
at random from the daily records, will serve to illustrate 
this phase of reference work. Questions about : Beet sugar 
industry. Corporation finance, Mercury arcs. Wood turning, 
Afghan stitch, Jiu jitsu. Symbolism in art. Collective bargain- 
ing, Japanese prints. Machine shop practice, Hebrew music, 
Philippine independence, Concrete construction. Spraying 
trees. Power transmission. Federal reserve act. Marble polish- 
ing. Die making, Lumber in Europe, Cabinet work. How to 
write effective business letters. 

In June the library published a list of 384 books dealing 
with over sixty trades and professions for men, entitled "The 
Day's Work, What to do, and How to do It." This little book- 
let, although setting forth only the resources of this library 
and purely local in its purpose, has attracted considerable at- 
tention, and the library has received requests for copies from, 
man}?- sources from England to the Pacific coast. 

A new card catalogue of our music collection has been 
completed. It contains not only the usual titles of works 
and names of composers, but many analytical entries intended 
to facilitate the use of large collections of songs and instrumen- 
tal selections. 

During 1919 the following changes have occurred in the 
graded staff. Carrie L. Williams resigned to continue in the 
army hospital service for which she had previously been 
granted a leave of absence. Margaret M. Kneil, High School 
Librarian, resigned to accept a similar position in the girl's 
high school, Brooklyn, N. Y. She was succeeded by Edytlie 
L. Miller, a graduate of Mt. Holj^oke, promoted from the statf 
of the West Somerville Branch. Edna Woodbury, Children's 
Librarian at Central, resigned to accept a commercial posi- 
tion. Gladys B. Hastings, a graduate of Wellesley and Chil- 



210 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

dren's Librarian at the West Somerville Branch, was promoted 
to fill the vacancy. Susan W. Curtis, in charge of graded and 
Junior High School deposits, accepted a similar but better 
paid position in Framingham. She was succeeded by Abbie 
G. Glover, a graduate of Simmons, promoted from the position 
of First Assistant at Union Square Branch. From the Sec- 
ond and Third Grades the following assistants resigned : Ethel 
M. Nute, Agnes F. Judkins, Helen E. Pulsifer, Eugenie Carter, 
Kuth H. Stretton, Florence M. Kennedy, and Bernhardena H. 
Morrison. 

The following appointments have been made to the graded 
staff: In the Second Grade, Ruth L. Swett. In the Third 
Grade, Jessie B. Alcock, Ruth Burckes, Harriet Fenwick, Flor- 
ence M. Kennedy, Dorothy L. Kinney, and Bernhardena H. 
Morrison. 

Three pupils were graduated from the Training Class in 
the spring, and were immediately appointed. Two of these 
have already gone to better positions in other libraries. No 
candidates were found for a class this year owing to the meager 
compensation offered by the library service. 

The attention of citizens who are interested in their library 
is directed to a brief summary of the war work of the Ameri- 
can Library Association, to which they made contributions 
of money, magazines, books and workers. The following figures 
to the end of 1919 are supplied by the A. L. A. War Service 
Headquarters. 

Amount of money raised for library war service . . $5,317,000 

Number of books placed in service .... 7,000,000 

Number of books overseas and on transports . . 2,563,500 

Number of different individuals in Library War Service 900 

Number of individuals overseas and on transports . 90 
Number of magazines used, uncounted millions. 

Out of this service now being brought to a close has come 
the decision of the United States Government to carry on li- 
brary departments in the army and navy, under the direction 
of a trained personnel. The A. L. A. has also adopted a compre- 
hensive plan of service for the merchant marine, light houses, 
coast guards, federal industrial plants, and other hitherto 
neglected social groups. 

The usual statistical tables herewith appended are submit- 
ted as a part of this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George H. Evans, 

Librarian. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



211 



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212 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



APPENDIX B. 
American Library Association Form for Uniform Statistics. 
The Public Library of the City of Somerville, Mass. 



Population served . . . . . . . 

Free for lending, and free for reference. 

Total number of agencies ...... 

Consisting of Central Library 
3 Branches 

High School Department 
165 School Rooms 
12 Institutions 

Number days open during year; for lending, and for 
reading ....... 

Hours open each week for lending (Central Library) 
Hours open each week for reading (Central Library) 
Number on staff (library service, adding part time em 
ployees to make whole units) .... 

Number of volumes at beginning of year 
Number of volumes added during the year by purchase 
Number of volumes added by gift or exchange . 
Number of volumes added by binding material not other 
wise counted ...... 

Number of volumes withdrawn during the year . 
Total number at end of year . . 



Adult. 



Juvenile 



Number of volumes of fiction 

lent for home use . . 252,245 110,783 

Total number of volumes lent 

for home use . . . 310,461 196,837 

Number of borrowers registered during year . 

(All records disregarded prior to April 14, when new 
registration system was adopted). 
Number of valid borrower's cards December 31 . 
Number of newspapers and periodicals currently received. 

Titles . . 

Copies 

Receipts from: 
Local taxation 

Library Department . . . $32,541 32 
Public Buildings Department. . . 9,744 00 
Endowment Funds: 

Total credit 1,802 83 

^'ines 1^969 76 

Other sources. Dog licenses . . 2,197 92 



95,000 
182 



302 
72 
72 

32 

115,340 

7,753 

63 

114 

4,301 
118,969 

Total 
363,028 

507,298 
10,078 



10,078 

224 
50.S 



$48,255 Sa 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



213 



Payments for: 






Books ..... 


$7,288 


34 


Pictures ..... 


22 


75 


Periodicals .... 


1,117 


17 


Music . : . . . 


1 


21 


Binding ..... 


2,045 


36 


Salaries, library service 


24,601 


57 


Other maintenance 


2,679 


52 


Public Buildings Department 






Janitor service, heat, light, etc., . 


9,530 


57 


Balance 


213 


43 


Balance from Appropriation . 


10 


28 


Balance from Endowment Funds . 


745 


63 


■" 


$48,255 83 



214 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

ORGANIZATION — 1919. 

Robert M. Lavender, Chairman 
Warren C. Blair. 
John EJ. Gilus, M. D. 



Clerk and Agent to Issue Bi^rial Permits. 
Laurence S. Howard. 

Assistant Clerk. 
OuvE M. Stanley. 

Agent. 
George I. Canfield. 

Medical Inspector and Bacteriologist. 

Prank L. Morse. M. D. 

(Returned from service in U. S. Army August 15.) 

Acting IVIedical Inspector. 
Ralph F. Hodgdon, M. D. (to August 4). 

Acting Medical Inspector. 
Losing H. Raymond, M. D. (August 5 to August 15). 

Acting Bacteriologist. 
Herbert E. Bovi^man, Ph. G. (to August 15). 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions. 
Charles M. Berry, V. S. 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar. 
Herbert E. Bowman, Ph. G. 

Milk Collector. 
William H. Wallis. 

Plumbing Inspector. 
Duncan C. Greene. 

School Nurse. 
Ella B. Hornbrooke, R. N. 

Assistant School Nurse. 
Grace M. Andrews, R. N. 

Health Nurses. 
Helen B. Berry, R. N. Mary L. Scott, R. N. 

Matron at Contagious Hospital. 
LiLUAN E. Gould, R. N. 

Assistant Matron at Contagious Hospital. 
Gladys Horne, R. N. (from Dec. 1). 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 215 

Office of the Board of Health, 
City Hall Annex, January 1, 1920. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen : — We respectfully submit the following as the 
forty-second annual report of the Board of Health in which is 
presented a statement, tabulated, and otherwise, of the sanitary 
condition of the city and the business of the board for the year 
ending December 31, 1919. 

Nuisances. 

A record of the nuisances abated during the year, in com- 
pliance with notices issued by the board, or under the board's 
direction, is presented in the following table : 



Complaints referred from 1918 
Complaints received during 1919 



Complaints referred to 1920 
Nuisances abated 1919 



Second and third notices sent on nuisances . . 38 

Received during 1919 ...... 602 

Total notices sent 



48 
602 



650 

27 



623 



640 

In addition to the above, 252 dead animals have been re- 
moved from the public streets. Many nuisances have been 
abated on verbal notice from the agent, without action by the 
board, of which no record has been made. Each spring the 
whole city is examined, and cellars, yards and alleyways where 
rubbish and filth have collected are required to be cleaned. 

Glanders. — Five cases of glanders have been reported dur- 
ing the year. Prompt action was taken in every case, and three 
of the horses were killed, two being released from quarantine 
by order of the cattle commissioners. 



Record of Permits and Licenses Issued. 

Cows. — Eight applications were received for permits to 
keep eleven cows, seven of which were granted to keep ten 
cows. 

Swine. — Thirty -nine applications were received for per- 
mits to keep eighty-two swine, thirty-two of which were grant- 



216 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ed to keep sixty-three swine. The fee is one dollar for each 
swine. On June 3, 1919, the Board of Health voted that no 
further licenses to keep swine in this city be granted. 

Goats. — Ten applications were received for permits to 
keep twelve goats^ all of which were granted. The fee is one 
dollar for each goat. 

Hens. — Two hundred and sixty-one applications for per- 
mits to keep 4,031 hens were received. Two hundred and forty- 
four permits to keep 3,809 hens were granted, and seventeen 
permits were refused. 

Grease. — Thirteen applications were received for permits 
for fifteen teams to collect grease, which were granted. The 
fee is two dollars for each team. 

Melting and Rendering, — Three parties have been li- 
censed to carry on the business of melting and rendering, un- 
der the provisions of the revised laws of 1902, chapter 75, Sec- 
tion 111, for which a fee of one dollar is charged. 

Massage and Manicure. — Four persons have been license<l 
to practice massage and manicure. The fee is one dollar for 
each license. 

^ales of Alcohol. — Chapter 360, Acts of the Legislature 
of Massachusetts for the year 1919 provided that no person, 
firm or corporation other than a registered druggist shall en- 
gage in the business of manufacturing, buying, selling or deal- 
ing in methyl alcohol, or wood alcohol, so called or denatured 
alcohol, or any preparation containing more than three per 
cent of any of the said alcohols, without being licensed so to 
do by the board of health. 

Under the provisions of this act sixteen licenses have 
been issued. The fee is one dollar for each license. 

Stables. 

No person has the legal right to erect, occupy or use any 
building in this city, as a stable, without obtaining a license 
from this Board for such occupancy. Each application is re- 
ferred to the Agent of this Board and no license is granted 
unless all regulations of the Board are complied with. The 
following is a record of applications received and licenses 
granted. 

Applications pending from 1918 .... 6 

Applications received during 1919 ... 28 



Licenses granted . . . . . 12 

Licenses refused ..... 15 



34 



27 



Licenses pending 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 217 

Board of Infants. 

Seventeen parties, whose applications were first approved 
by this board, have been licensed by the state board of charity 
to care for thirty -four children in this city, under the provisions 
of chapter 83 of the revised laws of 1902. 



Deaths. 



There were 1,074 deaths and fifty-four stillbirths in the 
city during the year, as specified in the following table, which 
shows a decrease of deaths under the previous year of 459 due 
largely to a return to normal conditions without any epidemic. 



Deaths at Somerville hospital during the year . 68 
Deaths at hospital for contagious diseases and 

tuberculosis ...... 26 

Deaths at home for aged poor (Highland Ave- 
nue) ........ 42 

Deaths at city home ...... 8 

Deaths at other institutions . . . . 30 



218 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Mortality in Somerville in 1919. 





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I. General Diseases. 

{A. Epidemic Diseases.) 
Cerebro-spinal meningitis 


"27' 


2 
3 
4 

1 


"l 

3 


1 


















3 


Diphth.eria 


1 
1 












2 


2 


q 


Influenza 








2 


1 


38 


Pertusses 




1 


1 






3 


Scarlet fever 














1 




1 


Typhoid fever 












1 










1 


( B. Other General Diseases. ) 

Abscess .. . 




I 




















1 


Acidosis 










1 
1 
2 
2 

1 


1 

2 








1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 


3 


Cancer of breast 


1 












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1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
3 


" i 

1 
1 

3 

1 


6 


Cancer of intestines 








2 

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2 

8 


2 

1 


11 


Cancer of rectum 


1 

2 

"2 


1 
2 
1 
1 


"i" 

1 
5 


3 
2 
3 

2 


11 


Cancer of stomach 


1 


4 


22 


Cancer uterus 


12 


Cancer other forms 


2 


8 


1 




38 


Convulsions 


1 


Diabetes 

Erysipelas 

Pernicious anaemia 


2 

1 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


3 


"i" 






2 


16 
? 




1 




1 


2 






1 


1 




7 


Pleurisy 

Septicaemia 


"i" 


1 






1 




1 




1 




1 








1 

1 


6 


Status Lymphaticus 

Tetanus. ... 










1 












1 
7 
4 












1 


Tuberculosis pulmonary 

Tuberculosis other forms 


11 

1 


5 

2 


7 


6 


9 
1 


7 


8 
2 


11 


2 


9 

1 


1 
1 


76 
14 


Tumor 






1 


II. Diseases of the Nervous 
System. 

Apoplexy 

Locomotor Ataxia 


5 


9 


10 


8 


6 


6 

1 


5 

1 
1 


7 


4 


5 


10 

1 


86 
3 


Meningitis 




2 


1 
1 












1 


5 


Myelitis 














1 


Neuritis 






















1 

"i" 


1 


Paralysis 






1 










1 






1 


3 


Spa.smophilia 














1 


III. Diseases of the Circula- 
tory System. 
Aneurism of aorta 


2 
1 
4 

19 
3 


1 
1 
1 
18 
5 








1 
1 

■9" 
1 












4 




3 
2 
9 
3 


2 

""4' 

2 


"s 

11 
3 

1 
2 

2 
1 










2 

1 

12 

5 


1 
1 
9 
9 


11 


Endocarditis 

Heart disease 


1 
5 
3 


2 
3 

1 


...„. 


2 

10 

1 

1 

1 

1 


17 
11'> 


Myocarditis 

Pericarditis 


36 

? 


Regurgitation 

IV. Diseases of the Respira- 
tory System. 

Bronchitis 


2 


1 
2 


1 
2 




1 
2 


1 


1 


1 


1 

1 
1 


1 
1 


13 
11 


Empyema 








9. 


Larvngitis 


1 

39 

1 


















1 


Pneumonia 


22 

1 


14 


21 
1 


6 


3 


2 
1 


5 


3 


12 


3 


11 


141 


Pulmonary oedema 


4 








1 













HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 219 

Mortality ir> Somerville in 1919. — Concluded. 





>> 


<D 


eg 


P. 

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OS 


S 

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>> 


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s 

< 


ID 
X! 

a 
s 


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(D 

s 

> 



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a 

a> 
c 

(D 




"3 


V. Diseases of the Digestive 

System. 
ArntiP indierpst.ioTi 




3 


2 
1 




















5 


Appendicitis 

Cholecystitis 




1 














1 
1 


3 


















1 


Cirrhosis liver 




1 


1 


1 










1 


1 




5 


Colitis 






1 




1 
■■2' 


" i" 


2 


Diarrhoea 


1 

■"e" 

3 


"2 
2 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 


1 
1 
1 








1 

3 


"'1' 


1 

2 

1 
1 
1 


5 


Enteritis 

Gastritis 

Intestinal toxcernia 




1 


2 


2 


16 
4 




1 

2 

1 










1 




4 


Intestinal obstruction 






1 








5 


Peritonitis 

VI. Diseases of the Genito- 
urinary System. 

Cystitis 


1 

1 

9 
1 

1 
1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


7 










2 

51 
6 

1 


Nephritis 

Uraemia 


5 


3 

1 


9 


5 


2 

1 


2 


4 


2 


3 


VII. Childbirth. 
Placenta previa 














VIII. Diseases of the Skin 
AND Cellular Tissues. 

Gangrene 










2 












1 


4 


IX. Malformations. 

X. Early Infancy. 
Atalectasis 






1 
1 














1 






2 


1 


1 






1 










6 


Premature birth and congenital 
debility 

XI. Old Age. 
Arterio sclerosis 
















13 
13 

1 


9 

14 
1 


2 
13 


2 
10 


5 

7 
1 


2 

7 
> 2 


2 
3 


2 

8 
1 


3 
4 


4 

9 
1 


3 

10 
3 

• 
2 
2 


6 

10 

1 

1 


53 

108 
10 

5 


Senile dementia 


XII. Violence. 
Accidental burns from fire 


1 




Accidental fall 






1 


1 


1 






5 


Accidental gas poisining 






1 










1 


Accidental poisining 






1 
1 


















1 


Drowning 


2 






















3 


Fracture of skull 






2 
















2 


Homicide 
















1 








1 


Railroad 


"l 


1 

1 
1 


1 


2 








1 




1 




6 


Rupture of the intestines 












1 












2 

1 








2 




5 


Suicide 


1 








1 


1 




5 


Surgical shock 












1 
93 


1 


Total 


lee 


125 


108 


84 


90 


73 


63 


61 


55 


71 


85 


1074 



Population (estimated)... 
Death rate per thousand. 



95,000 
11.3 



220 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



DEATHS BY AGES. 



Ages. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Under one 


118 


59 


59 


One to two 
















24 


15 


9 


Two to three 
















11 


5 


6 


Three to four 
















9 


6 


3 


Four to five 
















8 


5 


3 


Five to ten 
















18 


11 


7 


Ten to fifteen 
















10 


5 


5 


Fifteen to twenty 














25 


9 


16 


Twenty to thirty 














69 


32 


37 


Thirty to forty . 














69 


31 


38 


Forty to fifty . 














84 


43 


41 


Fifty to sixty 














123 


64 


59 


Sixty to seventy 














188 


84 


104 


Seventy to eighty 














206 


96 


110 


Eighty to ninety 














99 


31 


68 


Ninety and over 














13 


6 


7 


Total 


. 














1074 


502 


572 



Table of Deaths During the Last Ten Years. 



Year. 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

Average death rate per 1,000 for ten years 



No. of 


per 


Deaths. 


1,000 


1,043 


13.45 


1,035 


12.93 


983 


12.13 


993 


12.11 


990 


11.65 


1,003 


11.55 


1,081 


12.01 


1,067 


11.85 


1,533 


16.84 


1,074 


11.30 




12.58 



Table Showing the Five Principal Causes of Death in Somerville in 

1919. 



Heart 
Disk AS #. 


Pneumonia. 


Cancer 
All Forms. 


Tuberculosis 
all Forms. 


Apoplexy. 


Number of 
Deaths. 


ss 

so 


o . 


so 

^2 


o . 


Number per 
10.000 of Pop. 


Number of 
Deaths. 




Number of 
Deaths. 


Number per 
10,000 of Pop. 


195 


21.4 141 


15.0 


100 


10.9 


90 


9.9 


86 


9.4 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 






(B 

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C 
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Tuberculosis . 
ALL Forms. 


6161 


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222 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 223 

Diseases Dangerous to the Publio Health. 

This board has adjudged that the diseases known as acti- 
nomycosis, anterior poliomyelitis, anthrax, Asiatic cholera, 
cerebro-spinal meningitis, chicken-pox, diphtheria, dog-bite (re- 
quiring anti-rabic treatment), dysentery, German measles, 
glanders, hookworm disease, infectious disease of the eye, in- 
fluenza, leprosy, malaria, measles, mumps, pellagra, plague, 
pneumonia (lobar only), rabies, scarlet fever, septic sore 
throat, small pox, tetanus, trichinosis, tuberculosis (all forms), 
typhoid fever, typhus fever, whooping cough, yellow fever, are 
infectious, or contagious and dangerous to the public health 
and safety within the meaning of the statutes. Physicians are 
required to report immediately to the board every case ot 
either of these diseases coming under their care, and postal 
cards conveniently printed and addressed are supplied to them 
for the purpose. On receipt of a card from a physician, the 
principal of the school in the district in which the patient re- 
sides, the librarian of the public library and state board of 
health are notified. 

Specimens and Su<pplies. 

Outfits for specimens to be examined for tuberculosis, 
diphtheria, and typhoid fever, and diphtheria anti-toxin, vac- 
cine lymph and nitrate of silver solution may be obtained at the 
laboratory and at the following places : — 

R. A. Peckham, 154 Perkins street. 
Edward Edwards, 25 Union square. 
Willis S. Furbush & Co., 1153 Broadway. 
Hall Drug Co., Hobbs building, Davis square. 
Ernest B. McClure, 529 Medford street. 
John Morrison, 288 Highland avenue. 
Richardson Pharmacy, 310 Broadway. 
George E. Wardrobe, 693 Broadway. 

Hereafter the Agent of this Board will collect, daily, at 
five o'clock, p. m., all specimens left at culture stations for ex- 
amination, prior to that hour. 

Physicians desiring reports on the following day, of speci 
mens taken after this collection has been made must deposit 
the same at the City Hall Annex, in the receptacle provided, 
before nine-thirty p. m. 

Results of all examinations of specimens received at the 



224 ANNUAL RErORTS. 

City Hall Annex prior to nine-thirty p. m., will be reported to 
the physicians on the following morning. 



Medical inspection of Schools. 

The medical inspection of the schools of Somerville, which 
was instituted in December, 1907, has been continued during 
the year. The value of the system has been constantly dem- 
onstrated, and the work has been done in a very satisfactory 
manner. There has been harmony of action between the board 
of health and the school board, and the school principals and 
teachers have ver}^ generally co-operated with the inspectors 
in making the system as successful as possible. 

The inspectors make daily visits to the schools under their 
charge, and to them are referred all children who show evi- 
dences of disease or abnormal conditions. Children who are 
found to be unfit to remain in school are sent home, accom- 
panied by a slip properly filled out advising that the family 
physician be consulted. The inspectors also make an annual 
inspection of all the children in the schools, and any defects 
discovered are called to the attention of the parents. Monthly 
inspections of the school buildings and premises are made, and 
suggestions or criticisms are referred to the proper authori- 
ties. Every effort is made to protect the health of the chil- 
dren and to co-operate with the parents in keeping the children 
in as normal a condition as possible. 

In accordance with the provisions of the statute, tests of 
sight and hearing are made by the principals or teachers. 

The districts and inspectors are as follows : — 

District No. 1. — Eastern Junior High, Prescott, Hanscom, 
Edgerly and Boys' Vocational schools. Inspector, Dr. Francis 
Shaw, 57 Cross street. 

District No. 2. — Baxter, Knapp, Perry and Southern Jun- 
ior High schools. Inspector, Dr. Edward J. Dailey, 46 Bow 
street. 

District No. 3. — Bennett, Pope, Cummings and Proctor 
schools. Inspector, Dr. L. H. Raymond, 146 Highland avenue. 

District No. 4. — Morse, Carr, Durell, Burns and Girls' Vo- 
cational schools. Inspector, Dr. W. L. Bond, 322 Highland 
avenue. 

District No, 5. — Brown, Bingham, Forster and Northern 
Junior High schools. Inspector, Dr. H. M. Stoodley, 283 High- 
land avenue. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



225 



District No. 6, — Western Junior High, Lincoln, Highland, 
Cutler and Lowe schools. Inspector, Dr. H. Cholerton, 94 Col- 
lege avenue. 

District No. 7. — Glines and High schools. Inspector, Dr. 
Edgar F. Sewall, 281 Broadway. 

Parochial Schools. — Inspector, Dr. M. W. White, 21 AVal- 
nut street. 

During the year, 11,512 children have been referred to the 
inspectors during their daily visits, and 718 have been sent 
home because of illness. 

The following list will show the classes of diseases and de- 
fects which have been found in the schools, except defects of 
sight and hearing : — 



1. 



List of Diseases and Number of Cases Reported. 

Infectious diseases: — 

Measles 2 

Whooping cough ..... 3 

Chicken pox ...... 88 

Mumps 32 

Scarlet fever 8 

Diphtheria ....... 2 

Influenza ....... 29 

Infantile paralysis ..... 1 

Total .... 



2. 



3. 



4. 



Diseases of the nose and throat: — 
Enlarged tonsils and adenoids 
Inflammatory diseases 
Other abnormal conditions . 
Total .... 

Diseases of the eyes: — 

Inflammatory conditions of the eyes and lids 
Foreign bodies and injuries 
Other abnormal conditions 
Total .... 

Diseases of the ears: — 

Inflammatory conditions 
Other abnormal conditions 
Total .... 

Diseases of the skin: — 
Pediculosis 
Impetigo 
Scabies 
EJczema 
Tinea 
Herpes 

Miscellaneous conditions 
Total . 



657 

175 

16 



46 

1 

42 



34 
10 



666 
113 
61 
59 
17 
13 
169 



165 



848 



89 



44 



1,098 



226 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Miscellaneous diseases: — 

Diseases of the digestive system 
Diseases of the respiratory system 
Diseases of the circulatory system 
Diseases of the lymphatic system 
Diseases of the nervous system 
Wounds and injuries . 
Diseases of the teeth . 
Other conditions 

Total 

Total number of diseases reported 

Vaccinations performed 
Examinations for vaccinations . 
Certificate to work .... 



23 
145 

19 
110 

15 

25 
369 
124 



830 



3,074 

263 

1,013 

184 



Bacteriological Department. 

The work of this department was performed by Herbert 
E. Bowman, Ph. G., Inspector of Milk and Vinegar until 
August 15, 1919. 

Upon the above date Dr. Frank L. Morse having been dis- 
charged as Lieutenant Colonel from the U. S. Army returned 
to duty. On December 11, 1919 he was incapacitated by ill- 
ness and his work was again assumed by Mr. Bowman to the 
end of the year. 

Undertakers. 

Under the provisions of Section 44 of Chapter 78 of the 
Revised Laws of 1902, twenty-two persons have been duly li- 
censed as undertakers. 

Examination of Plumbers. 

The public statutes provide for a board of examiners of 
plumbers, consisting of a chairman of the board of health, the 
inspector of buildings, and an expert at plumbing, to be ap- 
pointed by the board of health. This board appointed Duncan 
C. Greene, the inspector of plumbing, to fill the place of expert. 
The number of licenses granted will be found in the report of 
the inspector of buildings. 



Health Nurses. 

There are at present four nurses employed by this Board. 

Two of these are employed as school nurses and as a result 
of the recommendations of this Board two additional nurses 
were provided for and assumed their duties on January 14> 
1919. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 227 

The work of these nurses consists of follow-up work re- 
garding tuberculosis cases and post-natal baby hygiene work. 

The reports of the school nurses are made a part of the re- 
port of the School Committee and those of the other nurses 
are made a part of this report being submitted in detail in 
subsequent pages. 

K. M. Lavender, Chairman, 
Warren C. Blair^ 
John E. Gillis^ M. D., 

Board of Health. 
Attest: 

Laurence S. Howard, 

Clerk. 



228 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF HEALTH NURSES. 



To the Board of Health, 
Somerville, Mass. 

Gentlemen : — 

We submit the following report of work performed by u^^ 
in post natal, infant hygiene and tuberculosis cases from the 
date of our appointment January 14, 1919, to December 31, 
1919. 

Infant Hygiene. 

Number of visits made to infants in good condition . 3433 

Number of visits made to infants in fair condition . 622 

Number of visits made to infants in poor condition . 226 

Number of visits made where infants have died . 46 
Number of visits made where infants have moved out 

of Somerville 129 

Number of visits made where wrong address was 

given ......... 164 

Number of visits made where infants were not at 

home ......... 401 

Number of visits made to infants with Ophthalmia . 37 

Number of visits made to boarding places for infants _25 

Total number of visits to infants . . . 5083 

Number of infants born in Somerville during 1919 . 1810 

Number of pairs of twins born in Somerville, 1919 . 27 
Number of infants who have died in Somer 

ville, 1919 65 

Number of sitill born infants during 1919 . 56 

Total number of dead infants for 1919 . 121 

Number of infants who have moved out of Somerville, 

1919 119 

Number of Mothers who had insufficient breast milk . 400 



Tuberculosis. 

Number of cases of tuberculosis in Somerville, 1919 . 289 

Number of visits made to patients in good condition 560 

Number of visits made to patients in fair condition . 292 

Number of visits made to patients in poor condition 301 

Number of visits made where patients have died . 267 
Number of visits made where patients have gone to 

Sanatoriums ....... 151 

Number of visits made where patients were not at 

home 231 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 220 



324 



Number of visits made where wrong address was 
given ......... 

Number of visits made where patients had moved 

out of Somerville ...... 173 

Total number of visits made to patients with 

tuberculosis ...... 2299 

Number of cases of pulmonary tuberculosis report- 
ed during 1919 178 

Number of cases of other forms of tuberculosis dur- 
ing 1919 30 

Total number of cases of tuberculosis reported 

during 1919 208 

Number of cases of Tuberculosis moved out of Som- 
erville during 1919 ...... 26 

Number of cases of Tuberculosis who died 

in Somerville during 1919 ... 90 

Number of cases of Tuberculosis who died out 

of Somerville during 1919 ... 24 



Total number of deaths from tuberculosis 

during 1919 114 

Number of cases of tuberculosis admitted to Sana- 

toriums, 1919 33 

Number of cases of tuberculosis previously admitted to 

Sanatoriums, ....... 63 

Total number of Somerville cases of tuberculosis 

now in Sanatoriums ..... 96 

Total number of cases of tuberculosis living in Somer- 
ville, 1919 289 

Number of homes where there are school children 

where there is or has been a case of tuberculosis . 199 

Number of children who attend school from homes 
where there is or has been a case of tuberculosis, 
the children having been reported to the schools . 360 

Number of houses from which the second case of 

tuberculosis has been reported .... 22 



Miscellaneous. 

Number of cases of typhoid fever reported during 1919 17 

Number of visits made to patients with typhoid fever 30 

Number of visits made to patients with venereal 

diseases ......... 87 

Number of visits made to patients with trachoma . 2 

119 



230 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Total number of visits made to infants . . . 5083 
Total number of visits made to patients with tuber- 
culosis 2299 

Total number of visits made to miscellaneous cases 119 



Total of visits made during year of 1919 . . 7501 

Kespectfully submitted, 

H. B. Berry^ 

M. L. SCOTT^ 

Health Nurses. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 231 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION. 

Somerville, Mass., 

January 1, 1920. 

To the Board of Health, 
Somerville, Mass. 
Gentlemen : — 

1 herewith present the report of the Department of Medical 
Inspection for the year 1919 including statistics of the Con- 
tagious Disease Hospital. 

From January 1 to August 4, 1919, Ralph F. Hodgdon, 
M. D., served as Acting Medical Inspector and from August 5 
to August 15, 1919, Loring H. Raymond, M. D., filled this posi- 
tion. Frank L. Morse, M. D., returned from the service of the 
United States having been commissioned as a Lieutenant 
Colonel and resumed his duties August 15th. On Dec. 10th 
Dr. Morse became incapacitated through illness and Dr. Hodg- 
don assumed the duties of the position for the balance of the 
year. 

Visits. 

Scarlet Fever — Each case must be inspected before release 
from quarantine to see that the condition of the pa- 
tient is suitble for release ..... 158 

Diphtheria — Before patients are released from quarantine two 

successive negative cultures must be obtained . . 175 

Contagious Hospital . 399 

For investigation and diagnosis . . . . . . 43 

Total number of visits ....... 775 

Contagious Disease Hospital. 

Dis- 

In Hospital Ad- charged, Well In Hospital 

Diseases Jan. 1, 1919. mitted or improved Dead Jan. 1, 1920. 

Diphtheria . . 5 102 101 4 2 

Erysipelas . . 1 10 8 3 

Scarlet Fever . 3 53 52 4 

Tuberculosis . . 11 42 23 15 15 

Whooping Cough .0 1 10 



20. 208 185 22 21 

The daily average of patients was 9.93 in the contagious de- 
partment, 12.52 in the tuberculosis department, a total of 
22.45. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph F. Hodgdon, M. D., 

Acting Medical Inspector. 



232 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND PROVISIONS. 

Somerville, Mass., 

January 1, 1920. 
To the Board of Health, 

Somerville, Mass., 

Gentlemen : — 

I submit the following as my report for the year ending 
December 31, 1919 ; 

Inspections. 

The following table shows the number of inspections made 
during the past year. In order to safeguard the consumer, 
all establishments handling foodstuffs are under constant su- 
pervision. Bakeries, lunch carts and restaurants have been in- 
spected weekly. 

Conditions in the Ice Cream and Candy factories have 
been greatly improved during the last year. All the factories 
in the city have been inspected monthly. 

The Barber Shops are under very careful inspection and 
must be kept in a sanitary condition and the barbers are re- 
quired to keep themselves neat and clean and to properly 
sterilize their instruments. 

Number of Inspections. 



Bakeries .... 


250 


Milk and Cream Plants 


149 


Barber Shops 


325 


Pedlers' Wagons and Stocks 1808 


Billiard Halls and Bowling 




Public Halls ... 30 


Alleys .... 


•JO 


Rendering Plants 




118 


Candy and Ice Cream Plants 


184 


Slaughter Houses 




241 


Factories .... 


266 


Stores and Markets 




4588 


Fish Markets 


617 


Stables 




362 


Grease Wagons . 


82 


Swine Pens 




88 


Hen Houses and Yards 


581 


Theatres 




84 


Hide Houses 


35 


Vacant Lots 




78 


Lunch Rooms and Cars 


548 


Yards and Cellars 




469 



Articles Condemned. 



Owing to market conditions dealers have been obliged to 
purchase very conservatively and, therefore, no large surplus 
has been carried by any dealer. There have been less articles 
condemned than during previous years as the following table 
will show: 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



28^5 



Fish. 



Butter Fish . 
Clams 
Flounders 
Haddock 
Halibut . 
Lobsiters (each) 
Mackerel 
Salmon 
Sword Fish . 



Apples . 
Apples . 
Bananas 
Blackberries 
Blueberries 
Canteloupes 
Grape Fruit 
Grapes . 
Lemons . 
Lemons . 
Oranges 
Strawberries 
Strawberries 



Beef (corned) 

Beef (fresh) . 

Fowl 

Hamburg Steak 

Liver 

Mutton . 

Pork (fresh) . 

Swine (whole) 

Sausages (fresh) 

Tripe 

Veal 



Asparagus 
Beans (shell) 
Beans (string) 
Beans (string) 
Beets 

Cauliflower 
Celery- 
Corn 
Greens . 
Lettuce 
Lettuce 
Parsnips 
Potatoes (white) 
Potatoes (white) 
Potatoes (sweet) 
Radishes 
Rhubarb 



Fruit 



IVIeats 



Vegetables. 



16 


Lbs. 


V2 


Bush. 


65 


Lbs. 


264 


Lbs. 


100 


Lbs. 


12 




144 


Lbs. 


188 


Lbs. 


16 


Lbs. 


1 


Bbl. 


2 


Bush. 


5 


Doz. 


29 


Qts. 


22 


Qts. 


3 


Crates 


3 


Boxes 


8 


Baskets 


14 


Doz. 


iy2 


Boxes 


4 


Boxes 


18 


Boxes 


3 


Crates 


239 


Lbs. 


324 


Lbs. 


371 


Lbs. 


84 


Lbs. 


29 


Lbs. 


361 


Lbs. 


203 


Lbs. 


2 




10 


Lbs. 


8 


Lbs. 


306 


Lbs. 


71 


Bunches 


3 


Bush. 


6 


Bush. 


5 


Baskets 


6 


Bush. 


1 


Bush. 


1 


Bush. 


12 


Bush. 


10 


Bush. 


10 


Bush. 


7 


Boxes 


2 


Bush. 


39 


Bush. 


1 


Bbl. 


2 


Bbl. 


1 


Bush. 



50 Lbs. 



234 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Squash . 


4 Bbl. 


Tomatoes 


9 Bush. 


Turnips 


1 Box 


Turnips 


2 Bush. 


Macaroni 


5 Team loads damaged at fire 



Slaughter Houses. 

During the year weekly inspections have been made at all 
slaughtering establishments and these plants were never in 
a more sanitary condition than at present. 

Owing to labor difficulties the number of animals 
slaughtered during 1919 in this city was somewhat less than 
during previous years. 



Number of Animals Slaughtered in 1919. 



Swine 
Sheep 
Calves 
Cattle 



1,150,585 

215,739 

111,769 

28,181 

1,506,274 



Examination of Animals for Contagious Diseases. 

Glanders. 

There has been a steady decrease of glanders in this city 
for several years which I believe is largely due to a thorough 
inspection and disinfection of stables and blacksmith shops, 
and to the discontinuance of public drinking fountairis for 
horses. Every stable and blacksmith shop in the city is in 
first class condition. 

In 1913 there were 55 horses killed for glanders; in 1914 
thirty; in 1915, 10; in 1916, 13, but eight of these were in 
one stable ; in 1917, 9 ; in 1918, 7, and in 1919 only 3 were 
killed, thus showing a very marked decrease in the disease. 



Animals Examined. 



Qua ran- 





Inspected 


tined 


Killed 


Released 


Horses 


2,368 


5 


3 


2 


Swine 


504 


50 





50 


Cows 


28 


1 





1 


Goats 


6 











Dogs 


3 


3 


1 


2 



2,909 59 4 55 

During the absence of the agent of this board while serv- 
ing as Major, 12th Regt. of the State Guard in Boston from 
Sept. 10 to Oct. 25, 1919, I performed his duties in connec- 
tion with my own as far as possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles M. Berry, 
Inspector of Animals and Provisions. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



235 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF MILK AND VINEGAR AND 
ACTING BACTERIOLOGIST. 

Chemical and Bacteriological Laboratory, 
City Hall Annex, 

Somerville, Mass., 

January 1, 1920. 

To the Board of Health, 
Somerville, Mass. 
Gentlemen : — 

I herewith present my annual report for the year ending 
Dec. 31, 1919. 

On the above date there were in this city licensed to sell 
milk, 432 stores and 47 dealers, and 152 stores to sell oleomar- 
garine. 

Of the 47 dealers, 19 are located in this city and 28 in the 
neighboring cities and towns, and 4 dealers have discontinued 
business. 

There are approximately 25,000 quarts of milk and 1,900 
quarts of cream distributed in Somerville daily, and 16 deal- 
ers are pasteurizing their milk according to Revised Laws 
Chapter 259, Acts 1917. 

Table 1. 



Months. 


en 


S3 M 

u 


< 




03 O 

o 


Total 

Income for 

Dept. 


January 


10 
19 
19 
19 
418 
92 
17 
21 
11 
24 
11 
24 


5.00 
9.50 
9.50 
9.50 
209.00 

46.00 
8.50 

10.50 
5.50 

12.00 
5.50 

12.00 




5.00 

9.50 

10.50 

15.00 

210.00 

46.00 

19.50 

27.00 

13.50 

18.50 

5.50 

12.00 


10.00 

15.25 

41.50 

37.00 

39.00 

17.50 

16.00 

84.00 

36.00 

2.00 

4.00 

5.50 


15.00 


February 





24.75 


March 


1.00 
5.50 
1.00 


52.00 


April 


52.00 


May 


249.00 


June 


63.50 


July 


11.00 

16.50 

8.00 

6.50 


35.50 


August 


111.00 


September 

October 

November 


49.50 

20.50 

9.50 


December 




17.50 








Total 


685 


342.50 


49.50 


392.00 


307.75 


699 75 







236 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 2. 
Samples of Milk, Cream, Ice Cream and Vinegar Examined. 



Months. 


Chemical 
Samples 
Collected. 


cc 

S 

. O 

o 
o 


ii 


Total 
Collections. 


Samples 
left at 
Office. 


Total 
Examina- 
tions. 


January 


60 

63 
156 
201 
184 

80 
114 
177 

83 
104 
112 
241 


40 
42 
80 
80 
80 
175 
82 
66 
46 
60 
74 
60 


40 
62 
32 
82 
86 
63 
74 
27 
83 
104 
42 
28 


140 
167 
268 
363 
350 
318 
270 
270 
212 
268 
228 
329 


20 

33 

81 

64 

78 

32 

32 

135 

77 

4 

5 

11 


160 


February 


200 


March 


349 


April 


427 


May 


428 


June 


350 


July 

August 


302 
405 


September 

October 

November 

December 


289 
272 
233 
340 


Total 


1575 


885 


723 


3183 


572 


3755 







Table 3. 



Months. 




mo 




It 

s • 

GO 
H 


Total 
Notices. 


Inspections. 


January 


3 

3 

6 

16 

■ 18 

14 

30 

30 

7 

15 

10 

5 


1 
2 
2 

13 

11 

17 

24 

4 

2 

7 

4 

6 


1 

4' 

5 

5 

9 
12 
24 
12 

4 

5 
18 

3 




5 

9 

13 

34 

38 
43 
78 
46 
13 
27 
32 
14 


10 


February 

March 




5 




6 


April 




12 


May 




17 


June 




15 


July 




29 


August 




24 


September 

October 




8 




17 


November 




10 


December 




27 








Total 


157 


93 


102 




352 


180 









There were 4 court cases during 1919, all found guilty and paid 
a fine of $10.00 each. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



237 



Each month during the year pint samples have been taken 
from every milk dealer and analysed for food value (fats and 
solids) and cleanliness (bacterial count and sediment) and the 
yearly average is shown in the alphabetical list of dealers which 
follows : 

Bacteria Per C. C. 

Butter Fat Total Solids Maximum 

Legal Legal Allowed Past. 

Standard Standard Raw 500,000 or 

Name of Dealer 3.35% 12.00*% Past. 100,000 Raw 

Acton Farm Milk Co 3.75 12.14 684,000 Past. 

A. H. Andrews 3.65 12.11 77,000 Raw 

*J. Basher & Sons 3.25 11.44 290,000 Raw 

H. E. Bemis 3.79 12.42 214,000 Raw 

*H. C. Bennison 3.53 12.07 182,000 Past. 

E. E. Breen 3.70 12.32 294,000 Past. 

F. S. Cummings 3.70 12.29 61,000 Past. 

John Dillon 3.57 12.02 264,000 Raw 

F. E. Bdgerly 3.65 12.34 538,000 Raw 

A. F. P. Gassett 3.83 12.33 564,000 Raw 

F. E. Giles 3.65 12.13 200,000 Past. 

J. E. & H. J. Giroux 3.74 12.28 297,000 Raw 

B. J. Griffin 3.68 12.18 1,536,000 Raw 

J. P. Griffin 3.66 12.22 730,000 Raw 

J. M. Hager & Son 3.74 12.25 827,000 Past. 

H. P. Hood & Sons 3.84 12.29 80,000 Past. 

Kendall Brothers 3.67 12.24 337,000 Raw 

Maple Farm Milk Co 3.81 12.34 108,000 Past. 

A. T. Martin 3.83 12.35 134,000 Past. 

E. M. Monahan 3.84 12.38 628,000 Raw 

W. F. Noble 4.24 12.97 584,000 Past. 

P. O'Shaughnessy 3.80 12.37 2,558,000 Raw 

S. E. Paige 3.67 12.16 423,000 Raw 

H. A. Prescott 3.70 12.20 131,000 Past. 

Seven Oaks Dairy Co 3.98 12.64 63,000 Raw 

M. P. Shattuck 3.51 11.94 848,000 Raw 

H. L. Stone 3.67 12.11 244,000 Past. 

*Swenson Brothers 3.54 12.00 345,000 Raw 

*F. P. Thompson & Son 3.59 12.07 954,000 Raw 

Toothacker Brothers 3.80 12.32 94,000 Past. 

Turner Centre Creamery Co 4.10 12.72 32,000 Past. 

A. S. Tyler 3.76 12.24 1,074,000 Raw 

E. L. Tyler 3.68 12.14 446,000 Raw 

D. Whiting 3.69 12.20 287,000 Past. 

J. K. Whiting Co 3.80 12.38 41,000 Past. 

C. A. Woodbury 3.65 12.14 404,000 Raw 

♦ Fined for having milk below standard. 



The higher the fat and solids the greater the food value. 
The lower the bacterial count, the greater care in production, 
better handling or more efficient pasteurization is shown. The 
analysis of special grades of milk supplied on request. 



238 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



On February 10, 1919, Mr. William H. Wallis was ap- 
pointed by the Board of Health as Collector of Milk Samples 
for this department. 



Table 4. — Infant Mortality. 



Year. 


Births. 


Deaths 
under 1 
year, all 
causes. 


Deaths 
under 
1 year, 
enteric 
diseases. 


Enteric 

Death Rate 

per 10,000 

population 

under 1 year. 


Population. 


1915 


1898 


142 


25 


2.90 


86,000 


1916 


1952 


132 


23 


2.58 


89,000 


1917 


2035 


136 


18 


2.00 


90,000 


1918 


1981 


188 


18 


1.97+ 


91,000 


1919 


Returns 
Incomplete. 


118 


19 


2.00 


95,000 



Notwithstanding the increased cost of all foods during 
191 9 there was only one more death reported of children under 
one year of age from intestinal diseases than in 1918. 

For several years this department has recommended that 
all milk be pasteurized and it is with pleasure that we are able 
to announce that over 90 per cent, of the milk distributed in 
Somerville is pasteurized. 

Pasteurization is defined by a law which became opera- 
tive in 1917 and refers to milk which has been heated to 145° F. 
and held at that temperature for 30 minutes, then immediately 
cooled to below 50° F. There are many details relating to the 
process of pasteurization which should be given every dealer's 
particular attention and they are best brought out by a pam- 
phlet issued by the Dairy Division of the United States Dept. of 
Agriculture, extracts from which follow : — 



Essential Factors In Pasteurization. 

"Milk dealers should concern themselves with the effi- 
ciency of the pasteurizing process carried on by them and with 
the relative safeness of the pasteurized product. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 239 

The equipment necessary for proper pasteurization of 
milk should provide for: 

1. Heating and holding the entire quantity of milk 
at the proper temperature (145 degrees F.) for 
the specified time (30 minutes). 



"1 



Cooling the pasteurized milk to below 50 degrees 
F. immediately after the heating and holding 
process. 



In order to facilitate proper pasteurization some form of 
recording thermometer to record the temperature of -the milk 
during the process is usually installed. To check the accuracy 
of this thermometer frequent comparison should be made with 
an accurate standard thermometer. The point of attachment 
of the bulb of the thermometer varies with different apparatus 
and records secured! should not be accepted as conclusive 
evidence that the entire quantity of milk has received the maxi- 
mum degree of heat recorded. When the temperature record 
extends over a period of time, as in the case of vat holders, the 
charts usually record from the time the milk enters the vat 
until the milk leaves it. In interpreting the record the time 
when the vat became filled should be known, and the time of 
holding the milk at the proper temperature gauged from that 
point to the time the vat begins to empty. Since all the milk 
should be held 30 minutes, this will result in some milk being 
hold longer than the required time, as the temperature remains 
high while the vat is being emptied ; but it is the only positive 
method of assuring that all the milk receives the minimum re- 
quired treatment. 

For ascertaining the actual holding time of the entire 
quantity of milk in any heating and holding apparatus, there 
seems to be no better way than by personal observation with an 
accurate timepiece. 

When the temperature of heating is controlled by hand 
steam valves, the constant presence of the operator is necessary 
in order to avoid fluctuations in heating. However, with this 
kind of control slight variations of the temperature record 
chart may be expected. When automatic temperature controls 
are used the record on the chart will be more uniform." 



240 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Diagnostic Examinations. 

Frank L. Morse, M. D., Bacteriologist of this Board, re- 
turned from the service of the United States having been com- 
missioned as a Lieutenant Colonel and reassumed his duties 
August 15th. On December 10th he was taken ill and I again 
took up the Bacteriological work and submit the following re- 
port for the year : 








iphth 


eria. 












Negative 


Positive 


Total 


January- 


• • I 


147 


31 


178 


February . 








139 


46 


185 


March 








151 


48 


199 


April 








109 


31 


140 


May . . . . 








80 


44 


124 


June . . . . 








56 


22 


78 


July . 








47 


15 


62 


August 








35 


18 


53 


September 








42 


21 


63 


October 








46 


24 


70 


November 








92 


20 


112 


December . 








70 


5 


75 


Totals . 








1,014 


325 


1,339 







Tuberci 


ilosis. 








Negative Positive 


Total 


January *^ 24 


5 


29 


February . 








15 


5 


20 


March 










14 


5 


19 


April 










15 


15 


30 


May . 










23. 


10 


33 


June . 










14 


18 


32 


July . 










11 


6 


17 


August 










8 


7 


15 


September 










10 


4 


14 


October 










21 


7 


28 


November 










s 


5 


13 


December . 










24 


3 


27 



Totals 



187 



90 



277 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



211 



Typhoid. 



January- 
February 
March 
April 
May . 
June . 
July . 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 

Totals 



Negative Positive Total 



4 





4 




















6 


1 


7 


5 





5 


7 





7 


4 


1 


. 5 


7 


1 


8 


8 





8 


11 





11 


1 


4 


5 


4 





4 



57 



64 



Examinations made for Malaria, Oph- 
thalmia, Paratyphoid, Gonorrhea and 
Pneumonia ..... 

Total examinations 



18 



1698 



Respectfully submitted, 

Herbert E. Bowman, 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar 
and Acting Bacteriologist. 



242 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SUPPORT OF POOR DEPARTMENT. 



Board of Overseers of the Poor. 

Fred E. Durgin, President. 

Henry F. Curtis, M. D., Vice-President. 

Michael Coll. 

Committees. 

On Finance, Investigation and Relief, and City Home. 

Mr. Durgin, Dr. Curtis, and Mr. Coll. 

Clerks. 
Jean M. Hutchins. (Resigned July 26, 1919). 
Josephine M. Sander. (Appointed Nov. 3, 1919). 
Cora F. Lewis. 

General Agent. 
William E. Copithorne. (Appointed Mar. 1, 1919). 

Acting General Agent. 
Jean M. Hutchins. (Jan. 1 to Mar. 1). 

City Physician. 
C. Clarke Towle, M. D. 

Warden and Matron, City Home. 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Foster Colquhoun. 

Office. 
City Hall Annex, Highland Avenue. 



SUPPORT OF POOR DEPARTMENT. 24r:J 



Somerville^ Mass., December 31, 1919. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville: — 

Gentlemen, — The reports of the general agent, the war- 
den of the City Home and the city physician, with tables show 
ing the work, are herewith submitted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Fred E. Durgin, 

Henry F. Curtis^ 

Michael Coll^ 

Overseers 
of the 
Poor. 



244 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF GENERAL AGENT. 



City Hall Annex, January 1, 1920. 

To the Overseers of the Poor, Somerville, Mass: — 

Gentlemen, — I submit the following as the report of the 
general agent for the 3 ear ending December 31, 1919: — 



Table No. 1. 

FULL SUPPORT (During the year). 

In City Home (men 33, women 37) 70 

In City Home, December 31, 1919 ..... 51 

In private families ........ 17 

In hospitals for the sick in other towns, cities and state . 42 

In care of state division minor wards (children) ... 11 



Table No. 2. 

PARTIAL SUPPORT (Outside Relief). 

Families .......... 272 

Persons aided (including hospital cases) . . . . 1,057 

Burials .......... 6 

Permits to State Infirmary ....... 10 

Average expenses to the city for each (carriage for three) . $4.40 

Table No. 3. 

AID UNDER 1913 LAW (Mother's Aid). 

Number of applications from widows or deserted women . 98 

Number of families aided at close of year .... 74 

Number of children ........ 297 

Amount allowed each family, from $2.00 to $14.00 per week 

Number of out-of-town families ...... 22 

Number having no settlement ...... 24 

COST TO CITY. 

Somerville settlement $16,935 28 

Settled in other cities and towns (reside here) . . , 5,028 18 

State 5,155 51 

Somerville families living in other cities and towns . . 1,701 26 

$28,820 23 



SUPPORT OF POOR DEPARTMENT. 



245 



Table No. 4. 



REIMBURSEMENTS. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
City of Boston 

" " Brockton 

" " Cambridge . 

" " Everett 

" " Haverhill 

" " Lowell 

" " Lynn 

" " Maiden 

" " Medford 

" " Melrose 

" " Newton 

" " North Adams 

" " Woburn 
Town of Arlington 
" " Duxbury 
" " Hudson 
Individual 



$15,613 


3S 


941 


91 


443 


10 


1,602 


97 


472 


60 


5 


71 


44 


28 


50 


00 


3 


00 


1 


50 


18 


00 


7 


25 


21 


65 


79 


25 


156 


38 


40 


00 


24 


00 


19 


29 


$19,544 


27 



Table No. 5. 



SOMERVILLE HOSPITAL (Patients On City Beds). 

Patients having settlement in Somerville .... 53 

Patients having settlement in other cities and towns . . 17 

Patients having no settlement (chargeable to State) . . 26 

Total number of patients sent to hospital .... 96 

Amount paid to hospital ....... $5,218 44 



246 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table No. 6. 
POPULATION AND GROSS EXPENDITURES, 1883 TO 1919. 

Population 



Year 

1883 . 

1884 . 

1885 . 

1886 . 

1887 . 

1888 . 

1889 . 

1890 . 
1891. . 

1892 . 

1893 . 

1894 . 

1895 . 

1896 . 

1897 . 

1898 . 

1899 . 

1900 . 

1901 . 

1902 . 

1903 . 

1904 . 

1905 . 

1906 . 

1907 . 

1908 . 

1909 . 

1910 . 

1911 . 

1912 . 

1913 . 

1914 . 

1915 . 

1916 . 

1917 . 

1918 . 

1919 . 

* Census. 



(Estimated) 
. 27,000 
. 28,000 
. ^29,992 
. 32,000 
. 34,000 
. 36,000 
. 39,000 
. *40,117 
. 43,000 
. 46,000 
. 48,000 
. 50,000 
. *52,200 
. 54,000 
. 56,000 
. 57,500 
. 60,000 

*61,643 



62,500 
63,500 
65,500 
69,500 

♦69,272 
72,000 
74,000 
75,500 
75,500 

*77,236 
78,000 
81,000 
82,000 
85,000 

*86,854 
90,000 
90,000 
90,500 
91,000 



Miscellaneous, 
City Hoime, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
iMiscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City Home, 
Miscellaneous, 
I City Home, 
f Miscellaneous, 
( City Home, 



$23,697 

5,528 
$29,171 

6,622 
$28,667 

7,396 
$30,470 

7,548 
$20,476 

6,563 
$17,527 

7,474 
$18,237 

6,806 
$17,852 

7,001 
$17,955 

6,875 
$16,843 

7,562 
$16,110 

7,695 
$16,327 

7,842 
$19,201 

8,998 

$21,827 

10,945 

$35,619 

11,200 

$45,490 

11,218 

$51,759 

11,593 

$53,653 

13,417 

$63,420 



62 

83 

15 

43 

04 

64 

20 

39 

54 

11 

88 

36 

53 

79 

20 

23 

34 

56 

17 

83 

42 

89 

56 

03 

33 

97 

73 

95 

68 

25 

98 

65 

62 

41 

33 

77 

48 



15,411 20 

$67,682 53 
15,789 34 



$15,959 80 

17,272 52 

16,430 32 

14,341 83 

13,430 89 

13,375 98 

14,610 92 

15,261 14 

15,980 49 

17,015 30 

17,799 58 

19,733 13 

20,755 46 

21,999 79 

25,681 47 

28,522 21 

28,924 39 

29,226 45 
35,793 58 
36,063 68 
38,018 59 
27,039 65 
25,002 24 
25,044 32 
24,853 43 

24.830 90 
24,406 00 
23,806 31 
24,169 59 
28,200 30 
32,773 68 
46,819 93 
56,709 63 
63,353 03 
67,071 10 

78.831 68 
83,471 87 



Table No. 7. 
EXPENDITURES IN DETAIL FOR THE YEAR 1919. 



1919 


Cash 
Allowance 


Med. Att. 

and 
Medicine 


Board. 


Groceries. 


Somerville 

Poor in 
other t;ities 
and Towns. 


Dry 
Goods 

and 
Shoes. 


Burials. 


Salaries. 


Fuel. 


Sundries. 


Cash 
Paid 
Out. 


Telephone. 


Stationery 

and 
Printing. 


Somerville 
Hospital. 


State 
Institu- 
tions. 


Other 
Institu- 
tions. 


Nursing. 


Somerville 1 

Poor in 
other Cities Total 
and Towns 
1913 Law. 


January 

February 

March 


$30.43 

30.00 

76.43 

74.44 

71.01 

76.51 

96.93 

108.35 

108.57 

110.35 

147.43 

145.78 


151.08 

23.'34 
27.64 
15.93 

18.42 
52.51 


$115.29 

86.43 

93.01 

379.68 

95.29 

431.12 

126.15 

95.29 

433.27 

121.00 

97.85 

667.86 


$373.60 
296.50 
297.50 
344.00 
375.00 
326.50 
335.50 
240.90 
337.00 
282.00 
328.23 
134.00 


$296.00 
628.67 
615.93 
497.69 

55L37 
989.40 

'37.76 
147.85 
522.20 


6.'50 


$114.00 


$269.72 
280.60 
521.85 
395.64 
614.76 
409.04 
479.04 
373.80 
329.04 
329.04 
445.80 
434.60 


$309.73 

230.14 

227.45 

12.09 


$16.50 

8.48 

7.30 

40.83 

14.33 

13.33 

8.83 

16.66 

8.33 

8.33 

29.38 

28.36 


$4,482.37 
2281.45 
4155.40 
2934.68 
3669.76 
2916.78 
2877.26 
3878.30 
3182.40 
3048.30 
3759.90 
3176.00 


$9.11 

15.26 
7.60 
7.53 
4.84 
6.75 

12.77 
8.24 
7.87 
7.81 

11.97 


$7.58 
6.93 
4.75 

12.25 
5.53 
6.86 
1.53 
8.79 
8.50 

15.00 
3.54 


$21.43 
702.86 
445.72 
441.43 
445.71 
754.29 
368.57 
438.86 
524.43 
435.00 
321.57 
318.57 


$33.00 
'54.72 

io.oo 

202'.'00 


$268.00 

88.50 

201.15 

42.50 

2'2'2.'2'8 

2'96'.'56 

37.50 

6.00 

6.00 


$10.00 
10.50 
10.00 

6.50 
14.00 
24.00 
12.50 

8.50 
10.50 
13.00 
16.50 

8.00 




$6,407.84 




4,666.32 






6,687.43 






5,271.62 


IVTflv 




80.00 
514.69 


5,306.16 


June 


142.00 




5,844.15 


Julv 




4,880.45 


August 

September... 
Optnbpr 


5.00 




763.00 


6,935.09 




5,246.47 








4,665.51 


November . . . 




227.99 
138.90 


104.00 
239.57 


5,707.02 


December 




7.64 8.76 


5,836.24 








Totals 


11076.23 


$188.92 


$2,742.24 


13,670.73 


$4,286.87 


$6.50 


$261.00 


$4,782.93 


$1,146.30 


$200.66 


$40,362.60 


$107.39 $90.02 


$5,218.44 


$299.72 


$1168.49 


$144.00 


$1,701.26 


$67,454.30 



SUPI'ORT OP POOR DEI'ARTMENT. 



247 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR OF SOMERVILLE 



Since the reorganization in 1885. 

THon. Mark F. Burns, chairman, ex-officio . 1885 

tCol. Herbert E. Hill 1885 

tCharles S. Lincoln, Esq., chairman . . 1885 

fHon. Edward Glines 1885 

tCharles G. Brett (president 1888-1892) . 1885 Apr. 
Edward B. West (president May, 1894- 

February, 1912) .... 1888 to 

tDaniel C. Stillson . . . . . 1888 Apr. 

tHon. Charles G. Pope, chairman ex-ofRcio 1889 
JNathan H. Reed (president 1893 to April, 

1894 

jHon. William H. Hodgkins, chairman ex- 
officio 1892 

tJames G. Hinckley .... May, 1892 
tAlbert W. Edmands .... May, 1893 Oct. 
tHerbert E. Merrill .... May, 1894 

JEzra D. Souther 1895 Feb. 

Hon. Albion A. Perry, chairman ex-officio 1896 
James H. Butler . . . March, 1898 

Hon .George O. Proctor, chairman ex-officio 1899 

Henry F. Curtis, M. D 1910 to 

Philip Koen 1912 Nov. 

Michael Coll .... November, 1916 to 
Fred E. Durgin .... October, 1918 to 



1888 inclusive 

1889 

1887 

1887 

1893 

1912 
1892 
1891 



1890 Apr. 1894 



1895 

1894 

1918 (Died) 

1909 inclusive 

1898 (Died) 

1898 inclusive 

1899 

date* inclusive 
9, 1916 
date* 
date* 



Table No. 8. 
RECAPITULATION (Miscellaneous). 



nixpenditures and transfers 
Reimbursements 

Net cost to city 



$67,539 53 net 
19,544 27 



$47,995 26 



* Present member. 
t Deceased. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. E. Copithorne, 

General Agent. 



248 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF WARDEN OF CITY HOME. 



City Home, January 1, 1920. 
To the Overseers of the Poor, Somerville, Mass : — 

Gentlemen, — I submit the following as the report of the 
Warden of the City Home for the year ending December 31, 
1919 : — 



Table No. 1. 

Number of weeks' board of inmates . 
Number of males admitted during 1919 
Number of females admitted during 1919 
Number of males discharged during 1919 
Number of females discharged during 1919 
Number of maleis supported during 1919 
Number of females supported during 1919 
Number of males died during 1919 
Number of females died during 1919 . 
Number of inmates in home December 31, 1919 



2,243-5 
11 
15 

6 

4 
33 
37 

4 

3 
51 



City Home Hospital. 

Number of weeks' board ..... 
Number of patients admitted .... 
Number of patients in hospital, December 31, 1919 



620-4 
18 
12 



Table No. 2. 



Reimbursements 
Net expenditures 


$10,690 87 

5,098 47 


Appropriation 
Service transfer . 


15,789 34 
. . . 15,635 00 
154 34 




15,789 34 




Kespectfully submitted, 




J. Foster Colquhoun, 




Warden. 



SUPPORT OF POOR DEPARTMENT. 



249 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



Office of the City Physician, 

Somerville, Mass., January 1, 1920. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen, — The work of your City Physician during the 
year 1919 is presented in the following abstract: — 



Office consultations and treatments 

Total outside visits 

Confinements 

Vaccinations 

Visits at City Home 

Attended at police station 

Examinations : — 

For legal department . ' 
For highway department 
For police department . 
For fire department 



118 
529 
13 
47 
59 
29 



33 
19 
34 
19 



Respectfully submitted, 
L. H. Raymond_, 

Acting City Pliysician. 



250 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF RECREATION AND PLAYGROUND COM- 
MISSION. 



City Hall, Somerville, 

January 1, 1920. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen — The Recreation and Playground Commission 
for 1919 consisted of the same membership as that for 1918, 
namely, Mrs. A. H. Weeks, Mrs. Charles E. Mongan and Messrs. 
Ernest W. Bailey, J. Foster Colquhoun, Charles S. Clark and 
Ceorge L. Dudley. 

. At the beginning of the year it was decided that it would 
be expedient to develop as thoroughly as ways and means would 
permit the several activities which the Commission had carried 
on during the previous year. These consisted of civic social 
work, under the leadership of a civic social worker employed 
by the Commission, summer garden work to be carried on in 
connection with the public schools, and supervised playground 
work to be conducted during the summer vacation. An appro- 
priation of 14100 was requested, of which |4050 was received, 
to enable the Commission to prosecute its work. 

The work of social service was conducted in the main in 
the Neighborhood House on Maple Street. Here was the head- 
quarters of the civic social worker and here were organized 
various activities for the benefit chiefly of the women and girls 
of that neighborhood. This work was ably supported by the 
women's clubs of the city who contributed both money and 
workers. Assistance was given also to a social service center, 
loovement at the Bingham School which was organized and con- 
ducted by Miss Elizabeth J. O'Neill, master's assistant in that 
school. In addition to providing the social worker for this 
undertaking, the Commission rendered some assistance in the 
maintenance of expenses of the Neighborhood House. 

When in the latter part of May, Miss Elizabeth H. Gold- 
thwaite resigned her position as social worker, it was decided 
not to fill that position until after the summer vacation. In 
the Fall, decision was made in favor* of another line of social 
service work and not to continue the employment of a civic so- 
cial worker. 

The Commission recommends that social centers be con- 
ducted in the Clark Bennett Schoolhouse with the Neighbor- 



PLAYGROUND AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 251 

bood House used as an auxiliary thereto, and in the Bingham 
School house. For this purpose a worker should be obtained 
who can organize these social centers and direct their opera- 
tion. 

The school garden work was conducted more successfully 
this year than ever before. By reason of co-operation with the 
School Committee, the garden supervisor was able to organize 
groups of garden workers in the several schools of the city and 
to have them ready to begin outdoor work as soon as the season 
was sufficiently advanced. Details of this enterprise are given 
in the report of th*e garden supervisor, William B. Moore, which 
is printed herewith. 

The summer playground work was conducted as efficiently 
as could be expected in view of the small amount of money ex- 
pended upon it. Owing to' the fact that for several years very 
little additional equipment and very little additional playing 
material have been bought, it was necessary to conduct the play 
work within narrow limitations. As will be seen by reading 
the report of the director, Stephen H. Mahoney, printed here- 
with, more apparatus and playing material as well as better 
pa}' for the play supervisors should be provided during the com- 
ing season. 

The Commission believes both of these undertakings should 
be carried on another year for the benefit of the children of this 
city. It recommends, therefore, that- better areas be allotted 
another year for the use of the children as school gardens and 
that supervised playgrounds be conducted under the control 
ol the Commission with increased facilities. 

The Commission believes, furthermore, that it is desirable 
to add slowly to the work which it is conducting in order that 
whatever is undertaken shall be conducted efficiently and with 
economy before additions are made thereto. For the next year, 
therefore, it recommends only the continuance of the policies 
herein discussed with such additions as may develop during 
the year to indicate beginnings of new enterprises. 

Following are the detailed reports of the supervisors of 
garden work and of the director of playground w^ork. 



Eespectfully submitted, 

Charles S. Clark, Chairman, 

Mrs. a. H. Weeks, 

Mrs. Charles E. Mongan, 

Ernest W. Bailey, 

J. Foster Colquhoun, 

Francis P. Garland, 

George L. Dudley, Secretary. 



252 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF PLAYGROUNDS. 

To the Recreation and Playground Commission, 
City of Somerville. 

Gentlemen : 

It is with pleasure that I submit to your body this second 
annual report of the activities of the Summer Playgrounds. 
In offering this report, I intend to bring to your attention the 
accomplishments of the past season, and suggestions for the 
conduct of the work in the future. 

Conditions Resulting From the War. 

The season of 1919, unlike the two previous ones, was not 
influenced by the atmosphere of war, and consequently the char- 
acter of some of the activities was difiterent from the preceding 
reasons. This is particularly^ true of the handwork, which in 
1917 and 1918, was devoted mainly to war activities. However, 
despite the fact that the war operations had ceased, the atten- 
dance on the various grounds was affected by the conditions 
which the war brought about. There was a noticeable decrease 
in the number of larger children attending the playgrounds, 
and upon investigation, it was learned that the same conditions 
J)] evailed in the neighboring communities where playgrounds 
are conducted. The general opinion is that the larger boys and 
girls had found emploj^ment and thus were not in attendance. 

Grounds. 

Playgrounds were conducted this year on eight different 
plots in the city, as opposed to seven grounds in 1918. The new 
ground was located on Somerville Field, at the western ex- 
tremity of the city. This ground had been in operation several 
years ago, but was discontinued at that time because of lack 
of patronage. The experiment this season proved that the same 
situation still exists in regard to this playground, for after a 
trial of three weeks, the numbers did not justify its continu- 
ance. One reason for this lack of patronage is, in my opinion, 
the need of adequate equipment on the ground. The addition 
of some permanent apparatus on this ground, which in many 
ways is well adapted for playground purposes, would attract 
a number of children from a district where the school popula- 
tion is very large. The other seven playgrounds were con- 
ducted as in the previous year, on Lincoln Park, Richard Trum 
Playground, Broadway Park, Kent Street Playground, and the 
Bennett, Perry, and Hodgkins school yards. Lincoln Park and 
the Richard Trum Playground were conducted exclusively for 



I'LAYGROUND AND RECRExVTION COMMISSION. 253 

boys^ the three school yards were conducted for girls, and the 
l^i'oadway and Kent Street playgrounds were accessible to both 
boys and girls. 

Supervision. 

The same number of supervisors and assistants was em- 
ployed this season as in previous years, with approximately the 
same amount of expenditure for salaries. Somerville spends 
less money for playground supervision than other commui>itie8 
of the same size, and has the reputation among playgrouml 
officials of conducting its grounds on an economical basis. This 
policy can still be adhered to with no decrease in efficiency, but, 
in the opinion of the Director, better results would be obtained 
by a rearrangement of the method of supervision, whereby 
^''orkers trained in special lines might itinerate. Such a policy 
has heretofore been adhered to in regard to sewing. The same 
arrangement might be made for a supervisor of folk dancing. 

One difficulty with which the Somerville Playgrounds have 
had to contend in the last few years has been the large number 
of inexperienced playground supervisors and instructors on the 
«taff of workers. In the early years of playgrounds in this city, 
it was customary for members of the playground corps to re 
turn each season. The failure of experienced instructors to 
return has been very noticeable in the past few seasons. This 
failure to return is undoubtedly due to the low salaries which 
Somerville has offered in comparison with what they can earn 
in neighboring cities. During the past season several former 
Somerville playground instructors were registered among the 
lists of instructors of other cities. It is therefore necessary for 
tliis city to expend more money on playground supervision in 
the years to come if the playgrounds are to continue in an effi- 
•cient manner. 

Meetings. 

At regular intervals during the summer season the entire 
staff of playground supervisors met with the Director at the 
High School to plan various features which were conducted on 
the grounds. These meetings have undoubtedly resulted in a 
uniform arrangement on all of the grounds, and have been the 
means of exchanging ideas for the betterment of the playground 
system. 

Exhibitions. 

On Wednesday, the 20th of August, a Demonstration Day 
was held at the Lincoln Park playground at which the children 
from all of the playgrounds of the city were present, and par- 



254 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ticipated in the program of games, dances, and competitive 
races which was presented to the public. This demonstration 
was somewhat different from any previous event conducted by 
the city's playgrounds in that it lacked the formality of pre- 
pared events and was unaccompanied by band music. There 
was, at this demonstration, also, an exhibit of the handwork 
made by the children during the season. Such Feature Days 
should be conducted each season when the circumstances so 
allow, as they serve both to stimulate the interest of the public 
in playground activities and afford the children something to 
which they can look forward during the summer season. 

In addition to the demonstration on Lincoln Park, the chil- 
dren of the Bennett School gave a neighborhood festival on 
their ground on the evening of August 19, the principal feature 
being the presentation of the playlet entitled '^Milk Fairies". 
This feature, which is intended to teach the advantage of milk 
as an article of diet, introduced many novel dances, and the 
costumes for' the affair were made by the children on the 
grounds. A like performance was given on the same day at the 
Kent Street Playground. 

Handwork. 

The handwork this year consisted almost entirely of work 
on materials supplied by the Junior Ked Cross Organization. 
Infants' and children's clothing formed the bulk of this allot- 
ment, and the children from the five girls' grounds all partici- 
pated in the making of the articles. This work was supervised, 
as in the past few seasons, by Mrs. Lillias T. Lawton, and at 
the close of the season the finished articles were returned to 
the Junior Red Cross. This is the first season that the hand- 
work has been devoted almost entirely to one type of work. It 
is felt that such undertakings provide for the children a lesson 
in public service in addition to the mere practice they receive 
from the making of the articles. A few of the girls' grounds 
made additional articles, the girls from Broadway Park mak- 
ing a few quilts for the neighboring children's hospitals. 

Games. 

The portion of the day allotted for more active recreation 
was occupied, during the summer, in the playing of the cus- 
tomary playground games as in the past seasons. Special effort 
was made this season to provide games suitable to the younger 
children who came in larger numbers than heretofore. On the 
girls' grounds an unusually large number of new games were 
employed, while the boys, for the most part, adhered to the 
customary boys' games which are universal on public play- 
grounds. 



PLAYGROUND AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 255 

Baseball. 

As has been the custom heretofore, both in Soinerville and 
every other American city, baseball was the chief attraction on 
the boys' playgrounds. Baseball leagues were organized at the 
outset of the season, and the boys were divided into three 
groups, as follows : 

Class A — the boys above fourteen years.. 

Class B — the boys between twelve and fifteen years. 

Class C — the boys under twelve years. 

There was keen competition in each of these three 
leagues, and a number of boys showed their proficiency in the 
national game. It is the proud boast of the Somerville play- 
grounds, since their inception, that more than seventy-five pe).* 
cent of the players on the High School baseball teams received 
their first training on the local grounds. The past season has 
been no exception in bringing to the front several boys showing 
marked baseball ability. In the opinion of the Director, some 
method of coupling the baseball interest of the summer play- 
grounds with the same activity in the schools of the city, would 
be to the decided advantage of both organizations. 

Dancing. 

Folk dancing received its customary attention in the pro- 
gram carried out on the girls' playgrounds, the usual well- 
known dances being most prevalent. This feature of the play- 
ground work is greatly handicapped in our city by the lack of 
a dancing instructor who should visit each playground regu- 
larly. There is great need, also, of providing musical accom- 
paniments for the folk dancing. Many other communities pro- 
vide phonographs for this purpose, and Somerville would do 
well to furnish the same. 

Despite the above handicap, the children of the play- 
grounds exhibit much talent in dancing as was evidenced at 
the demonstration on Lincoln Park and the neighborhood festi- 
vals at the Bennett and Kent Street playgrounds. 

Outings. 

A custom has grown among the playgrounds to conduct on 
some one day during the season a picnic or outing for the chil- 
dren of the respective grounds. The arrangement of this out- 
ing is left entirely in the hands of the individual supervisors 
who report their plans to the Director. This past summ'}r 
nearly all of the playgrounds conducted such picnics, the chil- 
dren journeying to Norumbega Park, Middlesex Fells Reserva- 



256 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

tion at Stoneham, aud such places. In two or three instances 
this 3'ear the business men of the community in which the play- 
ground is located offered the use of large automobile trucks 
for the purpose of transporting the children to and from their 
picnic ground. Other merchants of the vicinity donated prizes 
for the sports which were conducted at the picnics. The Direc- 
tor feels that no better testimony of the value of play- 
grounds could be presented than such action on the part of the 
people of the communit}' . At the same time the thanks of the 
Playground Organization is tendered to those individuals who 
have thus helped to make successful a public undertaking. 

Evening Supervision. 

The repeal of the Daylight Saving Act by the national 
congress has for the present, at least, interfered with a program 
which the Director had outlined for evening supervision. The 
large patronage which some of our city play spaces received 
during the last two summers had suggested the extension of 
the playground supervision to go over at least the twilight 
hours. But unless daylight saving is again resumed, perhaps 
such supervision will not be advisable. 

' Recommendations. 

The playgrounds of Somerville have been under supervi- 
sion for more than ten years, and have now arrived at a posi- 
tion where the work is no longer in the experimental stage. 
After such a period of trial, the experiment should be either 
considered a success or otherwise. Judging by the public sen- 
timent both in Somerville and other communities, it seems 
plausible to pronounce the movement a success. But if we are 
to endeavor to progress in this movement, there is much yet to 
be done in the way of improving our play facilities. I firmly 
believe that the present is a fitting time to add considerable 
equipment to the playground system. The following recom- 
mendations are made because they seem to the Director very 
necessary for the future. 

1. Permanent store houses for materials on every play- 
ground. 

2. Additional wading pools, such as the one now in use 
on Lincoln Park. The repairing of the pool at Trum play- 
ground. 

3. The re-surfacing of the school yards now used as play- 
grounds. 

4. Seating facilities on all the schoolyard playgrounds. 



I'LAYGROUND AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 257 

5. Additional swings on nearly every ground. 
0. Additional play space by the enlarging of the Kent 
Street and Bennett school grounds. 

7. The purchase of some permanent equipment, such as, 
slides, and frame apparatus, on the grounds which do not now 
possess them. 

8. The purchase of a large supply of smaller material, 
such as, play balls, quoits, etc. 

9. The employment of a supervisor to take charge of danc- 
ing throughout the city. 

10. The extension of supervised play to cover the school 
year as well as the vacation period. 

Conclusion. 

In concluding my report for the season of 1919, I desire 
to express my appreciation of the service and co-operation ren- 
dered by the heads of departments and other officials of the 
city. Thanks are due also to the members of the Somerville 
Playgrounds Association and the ladies of the city for their 
assistance in procuring and donating handwork material. 

Whatever success was accomplished in the past season was 
due to a large extent to the efforts of the several supervisors 
and assistants in co-operating with the Director. Finally, too 
much credit cannot be given to the children of the city for their 
assistance in aiding the playground management to give to 
them the best facilities for play that the city could offer. It 
is to be hoped that the spirit of team work, fair play, and loy- 
alty, developed upon the city's playgrounds, will be manifested 
in the larger civic undertakings of the future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Stephen H. Mahoney, 
October 24, 1919, Director. 



258 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF GARDEN SUPERVISOR. 



To the Members of the Recreation and Playground Commis- 
sion : — 

Permit me to submit a report of my work as Garden Su- 
pervisor in the City of Somerville for the season of 1919. 

After one year as your Garden Supervisor, I felt somewhat 
acquainted with the work to be done, and the desired results 
to be obtained from this branch of your activities. 

The same general plans that were in vogue last year, were 
put into operation again at the begining of this season. It was 
desired by Superintendent of Schools, Mr. Clark, that the gar- 
den work be more closely correlated with the general work of 
the school room. With this idea in mind I made up a school 
garden record book, one of which is appended to this report 
and each child having a school garden was given one of these 
record books, and expected to keep the same. In so doing, 
arithmetic and spelling, as well as penmanship are linked up 
with their garden activities. 

This year seventeen different schools, with a total number 
of 374 children participated in garden work. Two large areas 
were acquired for this work in addition to land used in previ- 
ous seasons, giving a total area devoted to this work of about 
9% acres. 

The land was prepared and ready for planting about the 
15tli of April, and all pieces of ground were actuall}' planted 
and the seeds germinated by the first of June. Everyone of the 
13 different pieces of land produced good crops, and all of them 
are this fall left in good condition for use another year. 

The idea of community plots in connection with each 
school unit was enlarged upon this season, and the sweet corn 
and squash raised on these pieces produced fine results. 

Before the garden work was started each child in 
each school having a school garden was organized into 
a Garden Club, with a President, Secretary and Treasurer. 
Meetings were held at which the Supervisor was present, and 
gave instructions to the members in the school-room before the 
planting season opened. In this way the child had a very good 
idea of how to proceed when the actual work out-doors began. 
Along this same line all children in public schools cultivating 
a garden at home or on vacant land were enrolled in the United 
States School Garden Arm v. I obtained 2250 signed enroll- 



I'LAYGROUND AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 259 

ment cards from children who carried on this form of garden- 
ing during the past season, and gave help and advice to all such 
children who requested it. 

During the summer the general appearance of our gardens 
called forth many words of commendation, both from Somer- 
ville citizens and others. The officers of the Middlesex Count}' 
Farm Bureau paid us several visits, bringing with them farm 
experts from all over the state to see the methods used and the 
results obtained. 

The children showed a keen interest in their work through- 
out the entire season and none of the products of their gardens 
were permitted to be wasted at any time. Parents of children 
having school gardens were interested enough to see that the 
vegetables were picked and brought home for their own use or 
sold by the child. 

Another work carried on in connection with the garden 
activities is that of canning for food conservation. Two young 
ladies were employed for two days a week during the summer 
months who carried successfully five canning clubs, with an 
enrollment of sixty-five members. Most of the children in the 
canning clubs were also members of the garden clubs, and at 
least 50 per cent of the material canned came from the school 
gardens. This material being perfectly fresh and of the very 
best quality, very little trouble was experienced in getting 
satisfactory results. 

I have just been informed by State Department of Agri- 
culture, that three of the five clubs are to be awarded a banner 
which certifies that all the members have done work of the high- 
est class and completed all the State requirements in this 
branch of the work. 

On the 14th of August a Field Day and picnic, with sev- 
eral neighboring cities was held at Spot Pond, Stoneham. 
About 100 members of our garden and canning clubs attended 
this outing, going in special cars, and a most enjoyable and 
instructive day was spent. 

At the close of the garden season we held very successful 
exhibitions, one at the Cutler School, and the other at the 
Southern Junior High School. The interests shown by the 
children in these exhibits was most noticeable, and the large 
attendance of adults was very encouraging. At both exhibits 
were shown lantern slides made from pictures taken of the chil- 
dren at work in their gardens, during the various stages of the 
garden season. 

The work of harvesting all crops and cleaning all pieces 
of ground was completed in every instance on the 15th of No- 
vember, and the record books kept by the members of the gar- 
den clubs were turned in at this time. 



260 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

From a careful survey of these books a statement of the 
amount and value of the garden products for the season has 
been made, and copy of the same is appended to this report, also 
a list of tools and equipments owned by the commission and 
their location this year. Also find appended a report of all 
expenses connected with the garden activities for the entire 
season. 

I might state that some little notoriety was brought to 
this city from the fact that first prize of |15 in cash was 
awarded the City of Somerville for their school garden exhibit 
at New England Staters Fair, held at Worcester, September 
1st. This was won in competition with 22 other cities from all 
of New England, and helps to prove that the quality of the 
products raised in the school gardens is of the best. 

Permit me to express my appreciation to each individual 
member of the commission for the interest shown in this work 
as well as the valuable assistance given at all times, which is 
in a large degree, responsible for the results obtained. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed) William B. Moorb, 

Garden Supervisor. 



PLAYGROUND AND RECREATION COMMISSION. 



261 



Somerville, Mass. 

SCHOOL GARDEN. 

Data Season 1919. 



me of School 






Area in 


No. of 






Location of Garden 


Acres 


Children 


Knapp 




Adrian Si. . 


1 


26 


Edgerly . 




Broadway Park . 


1 


25 


Morse 




Craigie St. . 


V2 


22 


Pope 




Prospect Hill 


% 


15 


High School 




Central Hill 


1 


5 


Perry 




Central Hill 


% 


10 


Bingham) . 




Lowell St. . 


1 


44 


Cutler 




City Farm . 


1 


50 


Brown 




Powder House Park 


V4 • 


18 


Highland . 




Powder House Park 


1/4 


20 


Baxter 




School Yard 


1^ 


12 


Eastern Junior 


Higl 


1 Glen St. . 


1/4 


10 


Southern Junioi 


rHigl 


1 Central Hill 


^ 


16 


Northern Junioi 


[•Higl 


1 Central Hill 


y2 


22 


Carr 




Central Hill 


% 


15 


Proctor . 




Central Hill 


V2 


24 


Western Junior 


Higl 


1 Tufts Oval 


1 


40 



9% 374 



262 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Season 1919. 

ESTIMATE OF AMOUNT OF CROPS GATHERED AND THEIR 

VALUE. 

Individual Plots. 











Retail 






Amt. from 


Total 


mkt, value 


Total 


Kind 


each plot 


amount 


per unit 


amount 


Radishes 


100 




37,000 


.01 


$370 00 


String Beans 


6 


qt. 


2,220 


.10 


222 00 


Shell Beans 


8 


qt. 


2,960 


.10 


296 00 


Yellow eye 


2 


qt. 


740 


.25 


185 00 


Table Beets 


200 




74,000 


.02 


1,480 00 


Table Carrots 


100 




37,000 


.02 


740 00 


Swiss Chard 


4 


pks. 


1,480 


.25 


370 00 


Summer Squash . 


25 




9,250 


.10 


925 00 


Tomatoes, ripe . 


3 


pks. 


1,010 


.65 , 


656 50 


Tomatoes, green , 


1 


pk. 


370 


.30 


111 00 


Cabbage 


6 


hds. 


2,220 


.15 


333 00 


Beet Greens 


1 


pk. 


370 


.25 


92 50 


Parsnips 


50 




18,500 


.02. 


370 00 




$6,151 00 



Sweet Corn 
Winter Squash 



Community Plots. 

825 doz. 
8,500 lbs. 



.35 
.04 



288 75 
340 00 

6,779 75 



No. Participating 
42 

November 15, 1919. 



Canning Club Valu<es. 

Average Value of Products 
16.50 



Total Value 
693 00 



Total Value 7,472 75 



CITY ENGINEER. 263 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of the City Engineer, 

City Hall^ Somerville, January 10, 1920. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen : — In accordance with the city ordinances, the 
following report of the work done and expense incurred for the 
year ending December 31, 1919, by the Engineering Department 
and of appropriations under my charge and supervision, in- 
cluding the accounts of city engineer, sewers construction, 
sewers maintenance, parks maintenance, playgrounds mainte- 
nance, and other public works, is herewith presented. 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

In previous reports the general work, charter requirements 
and city ordinances relating to the duties of the city engineer 
have been fully described. 

On account of the excessive cost very little new construc- 
tion work has been attempted, the greater part of the work 
done, being for repairs and maintenance in the various divi- 
sions. 

Divisions Appropriations and Credits Expenditures Balances 

City Engineer . 
Parks Maintenance . 
Playgrounds Maint. . 
Sewers Maintenance . 
Sewers Construction 

(Expenditures are shown in detail in the City Auditor's annual 
report) . 

CITY ENGINEER DIVISION, CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENSES, 1919. 

Sewers, — comprising surveys, estimates, profiles, lines, 
grades, titles, plans, assessments and all engineering 
work relating to sewers and supervision . . . $1,475 25 

Highways, — comprising plans, estimates, titles, profiles, 
lines and grades, inspection of paving and all other 
engineering work relating to the department . . 2,927 11 

Sidewalks, — comprising profiles, lines, grades, measure- 
ments, inspection, titles, costs and assessments . . 1,118 96 

Water Works, — comprising lines, grades, locations of 
mains, gates, hydrants and services and other mat- 
ters relating to the department . . . . . 690 95 

Parks and Public Grounds, — comprising surveys, plans, 

' estimates, profiles and grades, including laying out of 



$12,540 00 


934 00 


$13,473 42 


$ 58 


9,990 00 




9,989 46 


54 


4,050 00 


265 87 


4,312 97 


2 90 


20,660 00 


107 81 


20,766 62 


1 19 


5,295 77 


142 50 


4,753 52 


684 75 



264 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

parks, playgrounds, boulevard and supervision . . 1,256 89 

Public Buildings, — comprising surveys, estimates, lines 
and grades, and other work relating to construction 
and laying out of grounds ...... 362 47 

Street Numbering, — comprising locations of buildings, 

plans, assigning street numbers ..... 253 75 

Street Lines and Grades, — comprising establishing of 
lines, grades, and miscellaneous data given parties for 
building and grading ...... 195 52 

Bridges and Grade Crossings, — comprising surveys, plans, 

profiles, estimates, lines and grades, etc. ... 25 00 

City Survey, — comprising establishing of street lines, ac- 
ceptance plans, and miscellaneous survey work for 
city map, etc. ........ 484 56 

Middlesex Registry, — comprising copying of plans, and 
abstracts from deeds and examination of titles filed at 
East Cambridge, also tracing of street acceptance and 
sewer taking plans filed for record .... 94 92 

Private Corporations, Railway, Telephone, Electric Light 
and Gas Light Companies, — comprising grades, plans, 
profiles and office notes, locations of poles and conduits 490 61 

Setting Stone Bounds and Brass Rods, — defining street 

lines 123 53 

Office Work, — comprising record of all locations, indexing, 
typewriting, bookkeeping, calculations, reports, and 
general draughting ....... 2,428 11 

Miscellaneous Work, — comprising preliminary surveys, 
designs, sketches, etc., relating to various schemes for 
different committees ....... 208 45 

Holidays, Vacations and Sickness ..... 945 09 

Guard duty (Boston Police strike) 392 25 



Total $13,473 42 



Value of field instruments, tools and office instruments, 
12,000.00. 

The total cost of maintaining the Engineer's Division since 
it was established, 1872-1919, both years inclusive, has 
amounted to |393,305. 

Six assistants have been employed during the year on en- 
gineering work. Assistants and employees in other divisions 
of the department have returned from War duty and have been 
reinstated by the Civil Service Commission. Two assistants 
from the engineer's division were on duty for seven weeks dur- 
ing the Boston police strike in September and October. 

A number of plans were made during the year for street 
acceptance and six streets have been accepted as public high- 
ways, under the betterment act ; the greatest number of streets 
accepted as public ways in any one year being twenty-three. 

There are plans for acceptance of eleven private streets on 
file in this office, that for various reasons have not been made 
public ways. 



CITY ENGINEER. 



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266 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



The total length of public streets in the city is 84.296 
miles, and private streets 16.502 miles. (See table at end of 
report for location, width, length, etc.) 



Length of Public Streets in Each Ward. 





Miles. 


Ward one ...... 


10.659 


Ward two ..... 


9.572 


Ward three . . . . . 


7.630 


Ward four ..... 


9.965 


Ward five ..... 


12.388 


Ward six . . . . . . 


13.506 


Ward seven . . 


20.576 



Total length of public streets in the city 



84.296 



Stone bounds have been reset in Portland cement concrete 
at a number of street intersections and angles, to define and 
preserve the true lines of public streets, and this work should 
be continued as much as possible each year. These bounds are 
also of great convenience in establishing permanent "Bench 
Marks" throughout the city for giving grades. 

In the 1907 report a table was compiled from old reports, 
maps, and office notes, showing the location of stone bounds, 
the year when set, and whether existing or removed from 1860 
to 1907 inclusive ; and in the reports of 1908, 1910, 1911, 1918 
and 1919, together with the following table will show location 
of all bounds set to 1920. 



STREET BOUNDS SET IN 1919. .(Brass rods set in cement). 

Connecticut Avenue, — East side at Mystic Avenue X 2 foot offset 

lines. 
Connecticut Avenue, — West side at Mystic Avenue X 2 foot offset 

lines. 
Maine Avenue, — West side at Mystic Avenue X 2 foot offset lines. 
Maine Avenue, — West side sut north line Maine Terrace produced X 2 

foot offset lines. 
Minnesota Avenue, — East side at Pennsylvania Avenue X 2 foot offset 

lines. 
Minnesota Avenue, — East side at Broadway X 2 foot offset lines. 
Rhode Island Avenue, — West side at Mystic Avenue X 2 foot offset 

lines. 
Rhode Island Avenue, — West side at Pennsylvania Avenue X 2 foot 

offset lineis. 
Whitman Street, — North side at Packard Avenue X 2 foot offset lines. 
Whitman Street, — North side at intersection tangents to true lines. 

There are at the present time 630 bounds or brass rods set 
for defining street lines. 

Eleven new streets have been constructed, under the bet- 
terment act, with bituminous macadam wearing surface, con- 



CITY ENGINEER. 267 

Crete gutters and granite edgestones, a total of 4,161 feet (.79 
mile) ; all being done by contract. 7,755 feet (1.47 miles) of 
new edgestone were set in this construction work. 

The average cost of this type of construction complete, for 
a forty-foot width street, was |8.20 per linear foot, a high rate, 
on account of the unusual cost of materials and labor. 

Assessments have been levied on abutting property owners 
for a portion of the cost of constructing these streets. 

Old granite block pavement has been removed, the blocks 
recut and laid on a concrete base with a cement grout ; sections 
of Washington Street — Webster Avenue — Beacon Street — 
Tufts Street have been constructed with this type of pave- 
ment. 6.208 square yards (2,264 feet in length) were con- 
structed by contract at |3.40 per yard complete. 

The total length of permanent paved streets in the cit^^ 
amounts to 17.2 miles 

Grades were given and measurements taken for the re-con- 
struction of twenty-six streets with a bituminous wearing sur- 
face, a length of 21,200 feet (4 miles). 

Table of Street Construction. 

♦Streets paved with granite blocks 
**Streets paved with concrete . 
fStreets paved with asphalt top . 
Streets paved with vitrified brick . 
Streets paved with "Bi-co-mac" 
Streets paved with bithuliithic (patent) 
Combination pavement (concrete base 

with bituminous top) 
^Streets macadamized (bituminous bind 

er) ...... 

Streets macadamized (water bound) 
Streets graveled or unimproved 

Total 100.80 

* Also 31.9 miles (single track) electric railway paved with granite, asphalt, 

bithulithic, etc. 
** Includes 0.42 miles state highway. 
t Includes 1.16 miles of state highway. 
•| Includes 1.406 miles of city boulevard and park roadways and 2.331 miles 

of state boulevard (Metropolitan Park Commission), 

Lines and grades were given for constructing seventeen 
new granolithic sidewalks, 6,393 square yards (1.3 miles), and 
assessments computed, the abutting property owners paying 
one-half the cost. 

In laying out new work, under orders passed for construc- 
tion of sidewalks, etc., occasionally portions of buildings and 
fences are found to be encroaching on the sidewalk and on 



Square Yards 


Miles 


121,991 


5.15 


23,990 


1.42 


42,215 


2.59 


20,958 


1.29 


10,100 


0.77 


3,059 


0.06 


89,205 
1 


5.92 


L- 


38.52 




28.17 




16.91 



268 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



some of the old raiigeways these encroachments have existed 
for many years ; as improvements are made, the full width of 
sidewalk should be maintained. 

In sections of the city where brick sidewalks have been 
laid many years, and must necessarily be relaid on account of 
deterioration and unevenness, granolithic should be substituted 
for brick. 
Miles of Edgestone, Granolithic, Gravel and Brick Sidewalks in Each 



Ward. 







Gravel 


Brick 


Granolithic 




Edgestone 


Sidewalk 


Sidewalk 


Sidewalk 


Ward one 


19.827 


3.756 


12.093 


4.617 


Ward two 


16.286 


6.247 


6.606 


3.425 


Ward three . 


14.325 


0.967 


11.572 


1.784 


Ward four . 


15.309 


1.342 


9.993 


3.906 


Ward five 


22.679 


4.540 


12.194 


5.875 


Ward six 


24.826 


4.696 


10.678 


10.402 


Ward seven 


32.499 


2.484 


8.462 


21.920 



145.751 



24.032 



71.598 



51.929 



(Details, etc., streets and sidewalks in report of Street 
Commissioner.) 

The Boston Elevated Kailway Company has made extensive 
repairs in its roadbed in this city during the past year, replac- 
ing long sections of old tracks with new and heavier rails. 
There are a number of miles of trackage, orders having been 
granted for widening, however, in the city's main thorough- 
fares where the old granite block pavement, within the railroad 
location, should be relaid and grouted with cement, and addi- 
tional catch basins constructed between the rails to relieve the 
flooding of sections of certain streets in times of heavy storms. 
There are 32 miles of electric railroad (single track length) at 
the present time in the city's streets. A considerable length of 
high power cables have been placed in underground conduits. 

Plans have been made by the various companies and filed 
in the city engineer's office, showing the locations of gas mains, 
poles, tracks and conduits in this city, which have been granted 
by the board of aldermen during the year. The work of placing 
overhead wires in conduits underground and removing all poles 
from the streets should be extended as rapidly as possible. 

At the present time there are underground in the city's 
streets 17.43 miles of telephone conduits, 12.42 miles of electric 
light conduits, 1.65 miles of electric railway conduits; and 
about 9.7 miles of underground conduits used for the city's 
wires. 

The Cambridge and Charlestown gas companies have re- 
spectively 63.24 and 28.0 miles of gas mains in the city's streets. 



CITY ENGINEER. 269 

Lilies and grades have been given for laying new city water 
mains. New house services, many gates, hydrants, water posts 
and blow-offs have been located and recorded, sketches and 
plans made showing the same, and the water works maps cor- 
rected to date ; also a large number of old water services where 
new meters were installed, have been located and recorded. 

A number of the locations of old hydrants, gates, etc., have 
been found to be incorrect, a few having been removed entirely ; 
a new survey of the entire distribution system should be made 
and the maps and office records compiled. (Length of water 
mains details, etc., in report of Water Commissioner.) 

Lines and grades have been given for the erection of city 
buildings, and plans and sketches made for the laying out of 
surrounding grounds. 

Plans have been made and photographs taken where acci- 
dents have occurred on the city work, or where boundaries were 
in dispute, and special plans and data prepared for the city 
solicitor's use in court cases. Federal, State and Municipal 
hearings have been attended where information was required. 

All plans of estates in Somerville recorded at the Registry 
of Deeds, East Cambridge, including land court plans, have 
been copied, also titles examined, abstracts from deeds made 
for the purpose of assessments, and the proportional part of the 
cost of new work computed, and schedules of assessments made 
out showing the property owners. 

Total number of plans on file in the office is approximately 
eight thousand one hundred. 

. The city map was revised and printed in January, 1919; 
this new map has been of considerable value for various depart- 
mental purposes and useful for real estate agencies, auto tour- 
ing, etc. 

1 respectfully repeat some of the more important recom- 
mendations and suggestions made in reports of the city en- 
gineer for a number of years past which are for the improve- 
ment of conditions in this city — abolishment of the dangerous 
grade crossing at Park Street, as decreed by the court a number 
of years ago — reconstruct railroad bridge, Broadway (North 
Somerville) full width of street — construction of new bridge 
over railroad at Prospect Street, full width, the existing old, 
narrow wooden structure being wholly inadequate for the in- 
creasing auto travel — replacement of railroad bridge over 
Washington Street (East Somerville) designed to increase 
head-room in street and improve drainage, where at present, 
traffic is seriously impeded — extension of permanent street 
pavement, using old granite block, re-cut, laid on a concrete 
base — change city boundary line. North Somerville-Medford, 
thereby accomplishing a number of needed improvements es- 



270 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



pecially in the drainage system in this vicinity — construction 
of proposed sewer mains and storm drains in railroad valley, 
extending from near Gilman Square to Lowell Street — con- 
struction of proposed storm overflow drain from Somerville 
Avenue into Miller's River, at the East Cambridge line, for the 
relief of flooded streets and cellars in times of heavy storms — 
re-numbering old main thoroughfares and re-naming' certain 
streets to avoid duplication and prevent confusion — adoption 
of special ordinances concerning city inspection on all under- 
ground work done by private companies or corporations and 
regulations as to method of street openings — making of block 
plans covering the entire city area, useful to city departments 
— stone and sand obtainable on certain lots owned by the city 
to be utilized in construction work. 

SEWER DIVISION. 

The high cost of materials and labor has prevented the 
extension of the "separate system^' sewers and likewise storm 
drain construction work, except that absolutely necessary. 

No sewers have been petitioned for during the year and 
only a small amount of new construction work has been done. 



Construction Account, Statement of Expenses, 1919. 



Constructing storm drains 
Constructing catch basins 
Constructing manholes on sewers 

Cost of new work .... 
Charged to other departments, materials, etc 
Materials on hand December 31 



Total 

Appropriation 

Balance unexpended, 1918 



Credit. 



Received for materials, etc. . 
Materials on hand January 1, 1919 . 

Total 

Balance unexpended (over to 1920) 



$1,494 19 

2,481 14 

431 58 



142 
1,381 


50 
00 


$4,250 
1,045 


00 

77 


142 
1,176 


50 

89 



$4,406 91 

1,523 50 

$5,930 41 

5,295 77 

6,615 16 

$684 75 



The Fremont Street storm drain has been completed, dis- 
charging into Mystic River, and future extensions will provide 
for the disposal of storm water for the northerly slope of the 

Winter Hill district. 

Storm drains have been commenced in Elmwood Street and 
Conwell Avenue and will be completed during 1920. 




CITY ENGINEER. 271 

This work has been done by the city employing day labor. 
550 feet of 12'' pipe were laid during the year. 

The total length of the city's drainage system is 113.11 
miles, and the entire cost of construction has amounted to 
about .fi^B48;^-6.4>0; exclusive of the amount paid to the state 
for assessments for the construction of the North Metropolitan 
sewerage system. 

The city's assessment for the Metropolitan sewerage sys- 
tem for the past year was |51, 158.14 on construction account 
and 137,086.72 for maintenance, and the total amount paid the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts for this state sewer has been 
11,411,266.79 (1892-1919, both years inclusive). The total 
length of the Metropolitan sewerage system mains running 
through the city amounts to 3.475 miles. 

There are within the city's limits thirteen connections with 
the North Metropolitan state sewerage system, also four out- 
lets through the city of Cambridge and three outlets through 
the city of Medford. The locations of the connections of the 
city's mains with the state sewer are shown in the 1912 report, 
and details of construction in previous reports. 



272 



ANNUAL REPOR'J'S. 







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CITY ENGINEER. 273 

The 191 8 report contains a compiled table of Storm Drains 
constructed to 1919 showing length, cost, date of construction, 
district benefited, etc. 

Twenty-nine catch basins have been constructed in the 
highways during the year, making a total of 1,964 basins in the 
city for drainage purposes, constructed and maintained as 
follows : — 



By the city (sewer division): — 

Located in streets and subways .... 1,802 basins 

Located in city boulevard ..... 33 " 

Located in parks (17) and other city lots (12) . . 29 * " 



Total catch basins constructed and maintained 

by the city 1,864 

By Boston & Maine Railroad Company on railroad lo- 
cations ......... 36 basins 

By State, located in boulevards, and highways . . 129 " 



165 

Total catch basins in the city for storm drainage 

purposes ....... 2,029 

The separate system sewers should be extended in the old 
sections of the city each year, as the appropriation will allow, 
and storm drains completed in certain localities as previously 
recommended. 

The city's drainage system will be greatly improved when 
all the foregoing changes are made and construction work com- 
pleted. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT, STATEMENT OF EXPENSES, 1919. 

Maintenance of sewers, including cleaning 

and flushing (113.11 miles) . . $4,732 40 

Maintenance of catch basins, cleaning and 

flushing (1,864) .... 11,437 41 

Maintenance of storm water pump, Med- 

ford Street 82 66 

Changing line and grade and repairing 

catch basins ..... 880 41 

Changing line and grade and repairing 

manholes ..... 
Repairing old sewers 
Inspection and location of house drains 
New tools and supplies . 
Repairs of tools and property . 
Maintenance of sewer division yards 
Telephone ..... 
Expressing, etc. .... 



638 79 




1,055 68 




644 26 




431 10 




57 11 




669 50 




53 50 




1 32 






$20,684 14 



274 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Labor, teaming and materials for other 

depts 82 48 



Total expenditure . . . $20,766 62 

Credit. 

Appropriation $20,660 00 

Received from other departments: — 
Labor and teaming . . 74 12 

Materials .... 33 69 

107 81 



• 



Total credit .... 20,767 81 



Balance unexpended ... $1 19 

Value of tools and property on hand in maintenance of 
sewers, |2,500.00. 

A permanent force of men, varying in number from twelve 
to seventeen, and teams are kept continually at work flushing, 
cleaning and repairing the city^s drainage system, catch basins, 
etc., the expense necessarily increasing yearly as lengths of 
sewers, drains and catch basins are added to the system, an<i 
the distance increased to the dumps. These dumping places 
are fast diminishing and in a very few years' time some other 
means of disposal will have to be provided. 

Approximately 5,300 cubic yards of material have been re- 
moved from the catch basins and sewers during the year, at an 
average cost of about |2.15 per cubic yard, and the average cost 
per mile for cleaning and flushing the drainage system, in- 
cluding catch basins, has amounted to about $143.00. There 
are about twenty catch basins (average) to a mile of roadway 
in this city and the approximate cost of cleaning per basin has 
been about |6.14 the past year. 

A number of repairs have been made and sections rebuilt 
on some of the old sewers, alterations made in the outlets and 
overflows, and extra manholes built for the purpose of improv- 
ing the system. 

Many catch basins and manholes have been repaired and 
grade or line changed. 

One hundred three permits have been issued to licensed 
drain layers for connecting buildings with the main sewers and 
storm drains, fifty-five being for repairs or alterations ; all of 
the work being done under the supervision of the city's in- 
spector. 

Certain persons are licensed as drain layers by the city and 
under bonds, for the purpose of laying these private drains. 

There are to date about 16,523 private house drain connec- 
tions with the city's drainage system. 

During the year the sewer division has done considerable 
miscellaneous work for other city departments and outside conj- 



CITY ENGINEER. 



275 



panies, furnishing materials and labor, and being partially re- 
imbursed for the same. 

Some of the old trunk sewers which were constructed many 
years ago are in a dangerous condition ; sections, where the arch 
is badly cracked and liable to collapse any time, should be im- 
mediately rebuilt. 



PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS DIVISION. 

Under this division about seventy-five acres are maintained 
as parks and playgrounds, and approximately a mile of city 
boulevard ; 65.5 acres are owned by the city and certain areas 
owned by private parties are turned over to the city for recrea- 
tion purposes, also satisfactory arrangements have been made 
for a number of years whereby the city has the use of Tufts Col- 
lege playfield during the summer vacation months, and skating 
areas in the winter. Over 2,000 trees of various varieties are 
located on these grounds. These areas when completely devel- 
oped will compare favorably with other cities in the vicinity. 

Athletics in general have revived since the war and the 
baseball "diamonds," football fields, tennis courts and athletic 
apparatus located on the 'various playfields have been in con- 
stant use as in former years. The money generally spent for 
flower beds, shrubs, etc. for ornamentation of the various city 
grounds has been used in cultivating areas of park and play- 
ground land. Many school children have devoted their time 
and energies to the raising of vegetables on these playfields ; the 
total cost for plowing, harrowing, fertilizing, etc., amounting 
to 1285.32. 

The past year, this division of the engineering department 
has had the supervision of plowing and harrowing of private 
land throughout the city, the owners paying the cost, as pro- 
vided by law, whenever the city does the work at their request. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT, STATEMENT OF EXPENSES, 1919. 



Playgrounds 


$328 73 


188 


88 


1,109 


82 


11 


01 


24 


00 



Broadway Park (15.9 acres) 

Broadway Parkway (2.0 acres) 

Central Hill Park (13.1 acres) 

Lincoln Park (8.3 acres) . 

Prospect Hill Park (2.6 acres) 

Tufts Park (4.5 acres) . 

Paul Revere Park (.02 acre) 

Belmont Street Park (0.4 acre) 

Powder House Boulevard (0.9 mile long) 

Powder House Square Parkway (0.2) acre 



Parks 

?1,694 d5 

207 25 

1,793 94 

886 25 

1,306 6 

829 OS 

13 25 

422 88 

476 07 

49 12 



276 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



1,060 


58 


679 


29 


230 


74 


104 


80 


8 


25 


3 


00 


32 


95 


152 


43 


67 


72 


57 


40 


87 


50 


165 


87 



$4,312 97 



Playgrounds 

and 

Recreation 



$4,050 00 
265 87 



$4,315 87 
$2 90 



Cemetery, Somerville Avenue (0.7 acre) . 

Somerville Field at Alewife Brook (11.5 
acres) ....... 

Richard Trum Playground, Cedar Street and 
Broadway ...... 

Playground, Glen street and Oliver street (0.9 
acre + 1-5 acres private land) 

Playground, Kent street and Somerville ave- 
nue (0.8 acre) ..... 

Playground, Poplar and Joy street (0.5 acre) 

Playground, Beacon street, near Washington 
street (0.2 acre) ..... 

Playground, Webster avenue, near Cam- 
bridge line (0.2 acre) .... 

Playground, Mason street and Broadway Ten- 
nis court (0.3 acre) .... 

Playground, Fellsway East (2.5 acres private 
land) ....... 

Tufts College Land (Summer and Winter 
Playground, 4.8 acres) .... 

Plowing, harrowing and fertilizing Park and 
Playground areas for planting 

Plowing, harrowing, etc., for Recreation Com- 
mission, Private land .... 

Total expenditure, maintenance (75 acres) 
65.5 acres city property + 8.8 acres 
private land, .7 acre cemetery and 0.9 
mile boulevard, and 0.54 mile parkway 
roads ..... 



Credit. 



Appropriation for Parks .... 
Transfer to City Engineer Account 
Appropriation for Playgrounds 
Received from Recreation and Playground 
Commission 165.87 By transfer 100.00 . 

Total credit ..... 

Balance unexpended 



125 


12 


771 


51 


193 


70 


36 


79 


108 


84 


25 


00 


10 


00 


20 


00 



119 45 



$9,089 4<> 



Parks 
$9,990 00 
900 00 



$9,090 00 
$0 54 



The number of men employed has varied from seven to six- 
teen. 

The city's assessment for Metropolitan parks and boule- 
vards for the year 1919 amounted to 116,468.70 on construc- 
tion account, |34,048.82 being the proportional cost for main- 
taining the same; in addition to this the city's special assess- 
ment for the Charles River basin construction and mainte- 
nance amounted to ^7,917.24; for the improvement of Alewife 
brook and maintenance of same |1,169.30 and for the mainte- 
nance of Wellington bridge across Mystic River, |3,394.58. The 



CITY ENGINEER. 277 

total of these assessments amounts to |62,998.64, being Som- 
erville's proportional payment to the State on account of the 
Metropolitan park system for the year 1919. 

The total assessment paid to the State for parks and boule- 
vards amount to |765,970.79, January 1, 1920, and the length 
of State boulevard at present constructed in this city consists 
of seven-tenths of a mile of double roadway, located in the 
easterly part of the city and extending between Broadway an*! 
Mystic River, and one and three-tenths miles bordering Mystic 
River, and Alewife brook located in the westerly part of the 
city. 

Extra land has been taken at the junction of Broadway and 
Alewife Brook Parkway for future improvement of this road- 
way. 

The Metropolitan Park Commission have furnished six- 
band concerts, certain evenings during the summer months, 
at Broadway Park and Somerville Field. 

The playground area located on Broadway at Cedar Street 
has been named ''Richard Trum Playground" ; this young war 
hero was killed on foreign soil. 

A new flag pole has been erected at Broadway Park, replac- 
ing one destroyed by lightning. 

All tar walk on Central Hill Park should be reconstructed 
and the wooden seats in the grand-stand at Somerville Field 
rebuilt immediately. 

A permanent concrete field house should be constructed 
at the Somerville athletic field with all modern equipment and 
the remaining area graded as soon as possible; when com- 
pleted as originally designed the city will own one of the best 
recreation fields in the vicinity. (In the 1910 report, plan 
shows proposed complete laying out). 

The city has become so densely populated (about 22,000 
persons to a square mile) that portions of some of the larger 
park areas should be utilized for public recreation and physical 
training purposes ; on several of the playfields concrete build- 
ings should be constructed in place of some of the old wooden 
structures, additional apparatus provided on some of the prin- 
cipal parks and ]3laygrounds for the smaller children's pleas- 
ure, where regular park employees can have the care of the 
same, and some of the smaller playground areas should be 
enclosed by wire fencing for the protection of children. 

In certain localities of the city well-lighted playgrounds 
should be maintained during the summer evenings for young 
men and women working in the factories daily. 

Paul Revere Park area should be enlarged by acquiring 
additional land, constructing a street across from Main street 
to Broadway separating the city's park from the adjoining 



278 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

land, thereby preserving an historical spot on the top of Winter 
Hill for the future, and also making a convenient connection 
for travel. 

In connection with the departmental work the Recreation 
and Playground Commission and Playgrounds Association 
have been of great assistance in advising, directing and pro- 
moting the city's welfare. (Details, etc., in Commission and 
Association reports). 

The total yearly expenditure by the city departments 
and Somerville Association for recreation and plav is over 
$13,000.00. 

Appended Table. 

Annexed to this report is a table giving names of all 
streets in the city, public and private, lengths, widths, and 
the total mileage; in the 1910 report, tables were published 
showing old names of certain streets as formerly known, and 
names of public squares in the city. (Name of Oak Square 
changed to Wilson Square). 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ernest W. Bailey, 

City Engineer. 



CITY ENGINEER. 



279 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION, LENGTH AND WIDTH OF 
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE STREETS. 



Street 



-From 



Abdell Somerville ave 

Aberdeen road Cedar st. 
Aberdeen rd. ex. Angle 



Acadia pk. 

Adams 

Adelaide rd 

Adrian 

Albion pi. 

Albion ct. 

Albion 

Albion 

Albion ter. 

Aldersey 

Aldrich 



Somerville ave 
Broadway 
Somerville ave 
Marion st. 
Albion St. 
Albion St. 
Central st. 
Broadway 
Albion St. 
Walnut St. 
Pearl st. 



tJAlewifeBrkpkyMystic Val. pky 



Alfred 

Allen 

Allen ct 

Alpine 

Alpine 

Alston 

Ames 

Appleton 

Appleton 

Arlington 

Arnold ave 

Arnold ct. 

Arthur ct. 

Arthur 

Ash ave. 

Ash ave. 

Ashland 

Atherton 

Auburn ave. 

Austin 

Autumn 

Avon 

Avon pi. 

Bailey 

Banks 

Bartlett 

Barton 

Bay Stale ave. 

Beach ave. 

Beacon pi. 

Beacon 

Beacon ter. 

Bean ter. 



Broadway 
Somerville ave 
Park St. 
Cedar st. 
Alpine St. 
Cross St. 
Bartlett st. 
Willow ave. 
Clifton St. 
Franklin st. 
Porter st. 
Beacon st. 
Linden st. 
Broadway 
Meacham st. 
East Albion st. 
Summer st. 
Central st. 
Cross St. 
Broadway 
Broadway 
School St. 
Cross St. 

North St. 
Elm St. 
Vernon st. 
Broadway 
Broadway 
"Webster ave. 
Beacon st. 



To 

Southwesterly 
Highland ave. 
Westerly 
Northeasterly 
Medford st. 
Northeasterly 
Joseph St. 
Northeasterly 
Southeasterly 
Cedar st. 
Medford line 
Southwesterly 
Vinal ave. 
B. & L. R. R. 
.Cambridge line 
Medford line 
Charlestown st. 
Northwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Low 'ill St. 
Shawmut st. 
Robinson st. 
Clifton St. 
Liberty ave. 
Lincoln st. 
Southeasterly 
Northeasterly 
Easterly 
Bonair st. 
East Albion st. 
Northeasterly 
Sartwell ave. 
Spring St. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Mystic ave. 
Bonair st. 
Central st. 
B. & L. R. R. 



Public 

or 
Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 



Width Length. 

in 
Feet. Public Private 



25 
40 
30 
40 
40 
20 
40 
10 
16 
40 
50 
25 
40 
40 



449 

256 
907 

579 



2,742 



50 
25 
20 
30 
40 
40-30 
40 
40 
40 
40 
15 
10 
about 10 
40 
40 
40 
30 
40 
30 
40 
20 
40 
25 



100 

508 

611 

4,775 



644 

667 

688 
757 
580 
548 
120 
452 



438 
554 

478 
741 
606 
716 
408 
1,360 



West Adams st Private 
Summer st. Public. 

Broadway Public. 

Hamilton road Public. 



Cutter St. 
Beckwith circle Beacon st. 



Foskett St. 

Columbia st. 

^'oftheasterly 
Cambridge line Somerville ave. 
Somerville ave. Northeasterly 



Bedford 
Beech 
Belknap 
Bellevue ter. 
Belmont 
Belmont pi. 
Belmont sq. 
Belmont sq. 
Belmont ter. 
Benedict ave. 
Benedict 
Bennett ct. 
Bennett 
■>7An+r.n road 
Berkeley 
Berwick 
Bieelow 
Billingham 



Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 



South St. 
.Somerville ave. 
Broadway 
Albion St. 
Somerville ave 
Belmont st. 
Belmont st. 
Belmont ter 
Belmont st. 
Broadway 
T~nir>n st. 
Bennett st. 
Prospect St. 
Summer st. 
School St. 
Hinckley st. 
Boston St. 
Broadwav 



Southeasterly 
Southwesterly 
Cambridge line Public. 
Atherton st. Public. 
Hamilton road Public. 
Northeasterly Private. 
Highland ave. 
Southeasterly 
Southeasterlv 

N. ¥;. & s. w 

Easterlv 



Benedict st. 
Austin St. 
Prospect St. 
Bennett ct. 
Hudson St. 
Central st. 
Northwesterly 
Munroe st. 
William St. 



Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

P'lblic. 



40 
40 
40 
40 
40 

about 
15 
66 
24 
16 
28.5 
30 
40 
40 
20 
40 
25 
30 
20 
15 
20 
40 
10 

40 to 
40 
40 
20 
50 
40 



20 



639 
1,550 

382 
1,237 



6,007 



165 
323 
449 



2,192 

177 

75 

145 



585 



25 



1,208 
1.360 



208 
563 



203 
""6"7 



138 

i'ee 

116 
100 



50 
150 



127 
115 

100 



151 



150 



420 



200 
200 

no 

100 
112 



90 



137 
200 

ion 
400 



170 



JtMetropolitan Park Commission Boulevard. 



280 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 

Bishop's pi. 
Blakeley ave. 
Bleachery ct. 
Bolton 
Bonair 
Bond 

Bonner ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 

Boston ave. 

Boston ave. 

Boston 

Boston 

Bow 

Bow 

Bowdoin 

Bowers ave. 

Bow St. pi. 

Bradford ave. 

Bradley 

Braemore road 

Brastow ave. 

Bristol road 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway pi. 

Bromfield road 

Brook 

Browning road 

Buckingham 

Buena Vista rd. 

Burnham 

Burnside ave. 

Cady ave. 
Caldwell ave. 
Calvin 
Calvin 
Cambria 
Cameron ave. 
Campbell pk. 
Campbell Pk. pi, 
Carlton 

Carter terrace 
Carter terrace 
Carver 
Cedar ave. 
Cedar ct. 
Cedar St. pi. 
Cedar St. pi. 
Cedar 

Central road 
Central road 
Central 
Central 
Central 
Centre 
Chandler 
Chapel 
Chapel ct. 
Charles 
Charlestown 
Charnwood rd. 



From 

Glen St. 
Fellsway east 
Somerville ave. 
Oak St. 
Cross St. 
Broadway 
Washington st. 
Medford line 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Highland road 
Prichard ave. 

Angle in st. s'ly 
Kidder ave. 
Washington st. 
Prosp't Hill av. 
Union sq, 
Wesley sq. 
Washington st. 
Cottage ave. 
Bow St. 
School st. 
Pearl st. 
Broadway 
Lowell st. 
Broadway 
Charlest'n line 
Cross St. 
Marshall st. 
Main st. 
Top of hill 
Albion St. 
Willow ave. 
Paulina st. 
Broadway 
Warner st. 
Glen St. 
Sycamore st. 
Beacon st. 
Holland st. 
Broadway 
Elm St. 

Simpson ave. 
Washington st. 
Beacon st. 
Dimick st. 
Central st. 
Holland st. 
Meacham rd. 
Kingston st. 
Somerville ave. 
Summer st. 
Accepted part 
Porter st. 
Cedar st. 
Cedar st. 
Murdock st. 
Cedar n Elm st. 
Elm St. 
Central st. 
Central road 
Somerville ave. 
Summer st. 
Medford st. 
Albion St. 
Park ave. 
College ave. 
Sycamore st. 
Washington st. 
Allen St. 
Willow ave. 



To 

Easterly 
Cross St. 
Fitchburg R.R. 
Houghton st. 
Walnut St. 
Jaques st. 
Columbus ave. 
Mystic river 
Medford line 
Highland road 
Prichard ave. 
East to angle 

in street 
Kidder ave. 
Morrison ave. 
Prosp't Hill av. 
Walnut St. 
Wesley sq. 
Somerville ave. 
Lincoln park 
Elm St. 
Northwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Walter st. 
Medford line 
Porter st. 
Medford line 
Cross St. 
Marshall st. 
Main st. 
Top of hill 
Albion St. 
Willow ave. 
Paulina st. 
Arlington line 
Southwesterly 
Dearborn road 
Cross St. 
Central st. 
Dimick st. 
Southwesterly 
Pow. House Bl. 
Summer st. 

Northwesterly 

Southerly 

Dimick st. 

Washington st. 

Benton road 

Cambridge line 

Kingston st. 

Arl'ton Br. R.R. 

Lake st. 

Southwesterly 

Southwesterly 

Northwesterly 

Litiden ave. 

Southeasterly 

Southwesterly 

Southeasterly 

Broadway 

E'ly and N'ly 

Sycamore st. 

Summer st. 

Medford st. 

Broadway 

B. & L. R. R. 

Broadway 

Chandler st. 

Northwesterly 

Southerly 

Easterly 

Hancock st. 



Public 


Width 


Length 




or 


in 






Private 


Feet Public Private 


Private. 


10 


.... 


75 


Private. 


40 


.... 


630 


Private. 


30 


.... 


450 


Public. 


40 


476 


... 


Public. 


40 


1,535 


. • . 


Public. 


40 


655 




Public. 


40 


376 


... 


Public. 


60 


915 


... 


Public. 


50 


80 


. . . 


Public. 


65 


287 


. . . 


Public. 


50 


509 


. . . 


Private. 


50 





146 


Private. 


40 




376 


Public. 


40 


*649 




Public. 


45 


640 




Public. 


40 


1,242 




Pubhc. 


60 


658 




Public. 


50 


570 




Public. 


40 


341 




Private. 


24 


• • • • 


288 


Private. 


40 


• • • • 


300 


Private. 


40 


• • • • 


150 


Public. 


40 


762 


. . . 


Private. 


40 


.... 


9 


Public. 


40 


686 


... 


Public. 


4Q 


146 


. . . 


Public. 


100 


2,590 


... 


Pub. 100 to 200 


2.060 


. . . 


Public. 


100 


1,570 




Public. 


100 to 90 


1,030 


... 


Public. 


90 


2,540 


. . . 


Public. 


90 to 70 


1,030 


. . . 


Public. 


70 


3,250 


. . . 


Public. 


65-60-65 


3,220 


. . . 


Private. 


22 


• • • 


250 


Public. 


40 


1,262 


... 


PubUc. 


40 


504 


. . . 


Public. 


40 


679 




Public. 


40 


292 




Private. 


35 




276 


Public. 


40 


543 




Public. 


40 


.720 


... 


Private. 


40 




203 


Private. 


20 


• • • > 


210 


Public. 


40 


263 


• • • 


Public. 


30 


392 


• • • 


Public. 


40 


488 


• • • 


Public. 


60 


1,065 


• • • 


Pubhc. 


40 


399 


• • • 


Private. 


20 


. . • • 


84 


Public. 


40 


300 


... 


Public. 


40 


171 


. . . 


Private. 


18+ 


.... 


43 


Private. 


40 


.... 


156 


Private. 


22 


.... 


290 


Private. 


15 + 


r 


ro+ 


Private. 


20 


.... 


378 


Private. 


12+ 


J 


J0+ 


Public. 


40 


4,137 


... 


Public. 


40 


377 




Public. 


30 to 15 


221 


. . . . 


Public. 


33 


1,043 


... 


Public. 


40 


2,539 


. . . 


PubUc. 


45 


1,079 


. . . 


Private. 


35 


, , 


200 


Public. 


40 


1,232 


... 


Public. 


40 


273 


. . . 


Private. 


12 


. 


130 


Public. 


30 


'l66 


. . . 


Private. 


15 


• • • • 


400 


Public. 


40 


589 


. . . 



CITY ENGINEER. 



281 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street From 



♦Chelsea 

Cherry 

Cherry 

Chester 

Chester ave. 

Chester ave. 

Chester pi. 

Chestnut 

Chetwynd road 

Church 

City road 

Claremon 

Clarendon ave. 

Clark 

Cleveland 

Clifton 

Clifton 

Clyde 

College ave. 

College Clr. 

College Hill rd. 

Columbia 

Columbia ct. 

Columbus ave. 

Concord ave. 

Concord ave. 

Congress pi. 

Conlon ct. 

Connecticut av. 

Conwell ave. 

Conwell 

Cooney 

Corinthian road 

Cottage ave. 

Cottage circle 

Cottage pi. 

Craigle 

Craigie ter. 

Crescent 

Crescent 

Crocker 

Cross 

Cross St. (East) 

Cross St. pi. 

Ctown 

*Cummings 

Curtis ave. 

Curtis 

Cutler 

Cutter ave. 

Cutter pk. 

Cutter 

Cypress 

Dana 

Dane 

Dane ave. 

Dante terrace 

Dartmouth 

Day 

Dearborn road 

Delaware 

Dell 

Derby 

Dexter 

Dickinson 

Dickson 

Dimick 

Dix pi, 

Douglas ave. 

Dover 

♦Proposed. 



To 

Melrose st. 

Highland ave. 

Northeasterly 

Cambridge line 

Angle 

Cross St. 

Northwesterly 

Southeasterly 

West Adams st. 

Lake st. 

Cedar st. 

Mead st. 

Cambridge line 

Lincoln pky. 

Harvard st. 

Morrison ave. 

Arlngtn Br. RR 

Murdock st. 

Medford line 
College av. around to College av, 
Conwell ave. North st. 
Webster ave. Cambridge line 
Columbia st. Webster ave. 
"Washington st. Walnut st. 
Prospect St. Wyatt st. 
Wyatt st. Beacon st. 

Linwood st, Somerville ave. 
Columbia st. Easterly 



Mvstic ave. 
Elm St. 
Highland ave. 
Elm St. 
Medford st. 
Angle 
Chester st. 
Poplar st. 
Curtis st. 
Summer st. 
Broadway 
Holland st. 
Broadway 
Newton st. 
Central st. 
Appleton St. 
Morrison ave. 
Cedar st. 
Davis sq. 



Mystic ave. 
Curtis St. 
Highland ave. 
Beacon st. 
Broadway 
Russell St. 
Cottage ave. 



Penn. ave. 
North St. 
Southwesterly 
Line st. 
Cady ave. 
Chester st. 
Southwesterly 



Washington st. Northwesterly 
Somerville ave. Summer st 
16 Craigie st. Westerly 
Washington st. Hadley st. 
Hadley st. Pearl st. 

Highland ave. Crown st. 



Medford st. 
Broadway 
Cross St. 
Porter st. 
Fellsway 
Curtis St. 
Broadway 
Hinckley st. 
Summer st. 
Cutter ave. 
Broadway 
Central st. 

Bonair st. 
Somerville ave. 
Dane st. 
Craigie st. 
Medford st. 
Elm St. 
Boston ave. 
Aldrich st. 
Glen St. 
Temple st. 
Broadway 
Springfield st. 
Broadway 
Concord ave. 
Linwood st. 
Edgar ave. 
Elm St. 



Broadway 
Mystic ave. 
Northwesterly 
Lowell St. 
Middlesex ave. 
Hillsdale road 
Medford line 
Northwesterly 
Highland ave. 
Northwesterly 
Webster st. 
Beech st. 

Pearl st. 
Washington st. 
Leland st. 
Westerly 
Broadway 
Cambridge line 
College ave. 
Pearl st. 
Tufts St. 
Wheatland st. 
Medford line 
Beacon st. 
Pairmount ave. 
Calvin st. 
Southwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Cambridge line 



Pubhc 

or 
Private 

Private, 
Public. 
Private, 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private, 
Public. 
Private, 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private, 
Public. 
Public. 
■Private. 
Private, 
Public. 
Private, 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private, 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private, 
Public. 
Private, 
Private. 
Public. 
Private. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Pubhc. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



50 
45 
45 
40 
about 22 
20 
40 
40 
40 
40 
45 
40 
40 
35 
40 
40 
40 
30 
60 
10 and 12 
40 
40 
9 
40 
40 
30 
50 
20 
40 
40 
35 
30 
40 
40 
25 
about 11 
50 
25 
30 
30 
40 
45 
40 
24 
30 
40 
40 
40 
20 
40 
12 
40 
40 



1,450 

'885 
220 
451 

'537 

"964 

'560 

1,217 

552 

459 

200 

'664 
4,080 



816 

,425 
,483 
472 
202 

"487 
,346 
363 
245 

'556 



1,280 



174 
528 
680 
100 



654 
,357 

480 

'736 
262 



40 
40 
30 
25 
40 
40 
50 
40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
40 
40 
10 
30 
40 



696 

1,341 

569 

1,465 
908 
469 
451 
466 

1,031 

'770 
'957 



975 



1,390 

'iio 
'266 

*892 
'980 



220 



284 
449 

150 



200 



560 

"87 
150 

126 
402 



150 
700 
625 



170 
*83 



125 



25 
271 

ioo 

162 



282 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 





Private 


Streets. — Continued. 














Public 


Width 


Length 




Street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private 


Feet Public Private 


Dow 


Powder House 

Bd. 
Downer st. 


Ware st. 


Private. 


40 


257 


Downer pi. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


20 


125 


Downer 


Nashua st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


20 


120 


Dresden circle 


Cutter ave. 


Westerly 


Private. 


30 


133 


Durant 


Washington st 


"Southerly 


Private. 


20 


200 


Durham 


Beacon st. 


Hanson st. 


Public. 


40 


423 




Dynamo 


Willow ave. 


Whipple St. 


Private. 


30 


255 


Earle 


South St. 


Northerly 


Private. 


30 


322 


Earle 


End of above 


Fitchburg R. R 


Private. 


15 


115 


East Albion 


Mt. Vernon 


E. of MorelandPrivate. 


25 


188 




ave. 


St. 










East Albion 


E. of Moreland Medf ord line 


Private. 


40 


490 


Eastman road 


St. 

Highland ave. 


Southwesterly 


Public. 


40 


296 




Edgar ave. 


Main st. 


Meacham st. 


Private. 


50 


800 


*Edgeworth 


Mystic ave. 


Melrose st. 


Private. 


50 


1,380 


Edmands 


Broadway 


near Bonair st 


Public. 


40 


376 




Edmonton ave. 


Cross St. 


Fell sway east 


Private. 


40 


630 


Electric ave. 


Mason st. 


Curtis St. 


Public. 


40 


1.374 




Eliot 


Vine St. 


Park St. 


Public. 


40 


291 




Ellington road 


Highland ave. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


35 


120 


Ellington road 


West St. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


30 


405 


Ellsworth 


Cross St. 


Rush St. 


Public. 


40 


230 


. . 


Elm ct. 


Villa ave. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


18 


.... 


70 


Elm pi. 


Harvard st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


30 


190 


Elm road 


Elm St. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


25 


183 


Elm 


Somerville ave 


'.Cherry st. 


Public. 


63 


1.672 




Elm 


Cherry st. 


White St. 


Public. 


63 to 60 


330 




Elm 


White St. 


Banks st. 


Public. 


60 


660 




Elm 


Banks st. 


Beech st. 


Public. 


60 to 77.5 290 




Elm 


Beech st. 


Tenney st. 


Public. 


77.5 to 60 


570 




Elm 


Tenney st. 


Davis sq. 


Public. 


60 


1,429 




Elmwood 


Holland st. 


Cambridge line Public. 


40 


1,057 




Elmwood ter. 


Elmwood St. 


Easterly 


Private. 


20 


190 


Elston 


Elm St. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


396 




Emerson 


Everett st. 


Newton st. 


Private. 


30 


• • • • 


170 


Endicott ave. 


Broadway 


Woodstock St. 
(Exfn) 


Private. 


40 


I 


?00 


Essex 


Medford st. 


Richdale ave. 


Public. 


40 


232 


, , 


Eustis 


Beacon st. 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


30 


• • • • 


L50 


Everett ave. 


Cross St. 


Dana st. 


Public. 


40 


845 




Everett 


Webster ave. 


Newton st. 


Private. 


30 


350 


Evergreen ave. 


Marshall st. 


Sycamore st. 


Public. 


40 


1,320 


. . 


Evergreen sq. 


Porter st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


22 




179 


Exchange pi. 


Washington st Southerly 


Private. 


4.5 





70 


* Fairfax 


North St. 


Powder House Private. 


40 




)15 






Blvd. 










Fairlee 


Cherry st. 


Northwesterly 


Public. 


30 


144 




Fairmount ave. 


Curtis st. 


Northwesterly 


Public. 


40 


679 




Fairview ter. 


Sycamore st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


15 


• . . . 


173 


Farragut ave. 


Broadway 


Woodstock St. 
(Ext'n) 


Public. 


40 


905 




tJFellsway 


Mystic ave. 


Mystic river 


Public. 


70 to 130 


2,500 


. . . 


jJFellsway east 












(Winthrop 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


50 


1,222 




ave.) 














tJFellsway West 












(Chauncey) 
ave.) 
Fennell 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


50 


1,324 




Hinckley st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 




175 


Fenwick 


Broadway 


.Taques st. 


Public. 


40 


'eoi 




Fisk ave. 


Hinckley st. 


Lowell St. 


Public. 


20 


484 


. . . 


Fitchburg ct. 


Fitchburg st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


10 


.... 


225 


Fitchburg 


Linwood st. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


40 


.... 


100 


Flint ave. 


Flint St. 


Northerly 


Public. 


40 


202 




Flint 


Franklin st. 


Aldrich st. 


Public. 


40 


1,790 




Florence 


Washington st 


Perkins st. 


Public. 


40 


1,304 




Florence ter. 


Jaques st. 


S^outh westerly 


Private. 


20 




'90 


Forest 


Beacon st. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


*ii7 




Forster 


Sycamore st. 


Central st. 


Private. 


30 


.... 


430 


*Proposed. 














tJMetropolitan Park Commission Boulevard. 









CITY ENGINEER. 



283 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 

Foskett 
Fountain ave. 
Francesca ave. 
Francis 
Franklin ave. 
Franklin pi. 
Franklin 
Fremont ave. 
Fremont 
Fremont 

Garden ct. 
Garfield ave. 
Garfield ave. 
Garrison ave. 

Garrison ave. 

George 
Gibbens 
Giles pk. 
Gill's ct. 
Gilman 
GHman ter. 
Gilson ter. 
Glen 

Glendale ave. 
Glenwood road 
Glover circle 
Gordon 
Gorham 
Gould ave. 
Gove ct. 
Grand View av. 
Granite 
Grant 
Greene 
Greenville 
Greenville ter. 
Greenwood ter. 
Gritter way 
Grove 

Hadley ct. 

Hall ave. 

Hall 

Hamlet 

Hamilton road 

Hammond 

Hancock 

Hancock 

Hanson ave. 

Hanson 

Hanson 

Hardan road 

Harding 

Harold 

Harold 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Harvard pi. 

Harvard 

Hathorn 

Hawkins 

Hawthorne 

Hayden ter. 

Heath 

Heath 

Henderson 

Hennessy ct. 

Henrietta ct. 

Henry ave. 



From 

Willow ave. 
Cross St. 
College ave. 
Porter st. 
Washington st. 
Franklin st. 
Broadway 
Bowdoin st. 
Main st. 
Nr E. Albion st 

Somerville ave. 
Broadway 
Blakeley ave. 
Broadway 

Land City of 

Camb. 
Broadway 
Central st. 
Walnut St. 
Franklin st. 
Cross St. 
Pearl st. 
Linden ave. 
Broadway 
Cameron ave, 
Vernon st. 
Meacham road 
North St. 
Holland st. 
Porter st. 
Cedar st. 
Walnut St. 
Somerville ave. 
Broadway 
Summer st. 
Medford st. 
Greenville st. 
Beacon st. 
College ave. 
Elm St. 

Franklin st. 
College ave. 
Cedar st. 
Highland ave. 
Russell road 
Dickinson st. 
Elm St. 
Highland ave. 
Hanson st. 
Washington st. 
Skehan st. 
Pow. House Bd, 
No. of Ward st. 
Dimick st. 
Gordon st. 
Ivaloo St. 
Elmwood St. 
Harvard st. 
Summer st. 
Broadway 
Somerville ave. 
Willow ave. 
Linden ave. 
Temple st. 
Bond St. 
Richardson st. 
Medford st. 
Somerville ave. 
Highland ave. 



To 

Liberty ave. 
Glen St. 
Liberty ave. 
Conwell St. 
Franklin st. 
Southeasterly 
Washington st. 
Lincoln pk. 
Nr E. Albion st 
Mystic ave. 

Fitchburg R. R. 
Blakeley ave. 
Middlesex ave. 
Land of City 

of Camb. 
Woodstock St. 

(Ext'n) 
Lincoln ave. 
Benton rd, w'ly 
Northwesterly 
Westerly 
Walnut st. 
Northeasterly 
Northwesterly 
Tufts St. 
Yorktown st. 
Broadway 
Southeasterly 
Pow. House Bd 
Howard st. 
Southeasterly 
Southeasterly 
Vinal ave. 
Osgood st. 
Mystic ave. 
Laurel st. 
Munroe st. 
Northerly 
Northeasterly 
Bromfield rd. 
Morrison ave. 

Westerly 
Liberty ave. 
Cherry st. 
Boston St. 
North St. 
Concord ave. 
Highland ave. 
Lexington ave. 
Easterly 
Skehan st. 
Vine St. 
Ware st. 
Cambridge line 
Marion st. 
Medford line 
Kent St. 
Southeasterly 
Westerly 
Beech st. 
Arlington st. 
Washington st. 
Cutter ave. 
Easterly 
Bond St. 
Moreland st. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Fisk ave. 
Northerly 
Lexington ave. 



Public 

or 
Private 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Pubhc. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 

Private. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



40 
30 
40 
30 
20 
15 

40 + 
30 
40 
40 

25 

40 
40 
40 

40 

30 
40 

32.71 
10 
40 
40 
20 
40 
40 
40 
20 
40 
40 
16 
18 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
20 
25 
4 
40 



668 
578 
762 
180 
575 

2*3i6 

232 

1,112 



447 
460 



275 
665 
167 

1,430 
360 

2", 373 

410 
1,524 



763 



542 
411 
1,405 
555 
660 



996 



16 
40 
30 
30 
40 
40 
40 
50 
30 
30 
35 

20 and 
30 
40 
40 
40 
40 
35 
40 
40 
40 
30 
20 
45 
40 
20 
20 

8 and 
40 



926 
456 
616 
560 
267 
1,349 
376 

*469 

347 

40 .... 

465 

316 

'644 



717 
339 
330 

807 

1,043 
754 
569 



100 

'335 

370 
983 

390 

ioo 

i24 



110 
1,245 

'156 
144 



250 
165 
160 



95 



20 



290 



252 
283 

48 

2i6 
200 

120 



250 
161 



284 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street From 



Herbert 
Hersey 
Higgins ct. 
High 

Highland ave. 
Highland path, 

east 
Highland path, 

west 
fHighland rd. 
Hill 

Hillsdale rd. 
Hillside ave. 
Hillside cir. 
Hillside pk. 
Hinckley 
Hodgdon pi. 
Holland 
Holt's ave. 
Holyoke road 
Homer sq. 
Horace 
Houghton 
Howard 
Howe 
Hudson 
Hunting 

Ibbetson 
Illinois ave. 
Indiana ave. 
Irving 
Ivaloo 

James 

Jaques 

Jaques 

Jaques 

Jasper pi. 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jerome ct. 

Jerome 

Jerome 

Joseph 

Josephine ave. 

Joy 

Joy St. pi. 

Kenneson road 

Kensington av. 

*Kensington av 

Kent ct. 

Kent 

Kent 

Kenwood 

Kidder ave. 

Kilby 

Kilsyth road 

Kimball 

Kingman road 

Kingston 

Knapp 

Knowlton 

Knowlton 

Lake 



Chester st. 
Berkeley st. 
Mt. Vernon st. 
North St. 
Medford st. 
Morrison ave. 

Morrison ave. 

Morrison ave, 
Broadway 
Conwell ave. 
Pearl st. 
Craigie st. 
Walnut St. 
Broadway 
Dane ave. 
Davis sq. 
Oak St. 

Elm St. around 
Bonner ave. 
South St. 
Springfield st. 
Thorndike st. 
Marshall st. 
Central st. 
South St. 



To 

Day St. 
Oxford St. 
Westerly 
Pow. House Bd 
Davis sq. 
Arlington Br. 

R. R. 
Arlington Br. 

R. R. 
Boston ave. 
Fairmount ave. 
Sunset rd. 
Southwesterly 
Westerly 
Northwesterly 
B. & L. R. R. 
Northeasterly 
Broadway 
Southeasterly 
to Elm St. 
Northwesterly 
Fitchburg R. R. 
Cambridge line 
Gorham street 
School St. 
Cedar st. 
Cambridge line 



Public 

or 
Private 
Public. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Public. 
Private. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



40 
40 
16 
40 
60 
10 



337 



9.135 



Private. 10 

Pub. 30(70wide) 
PubHc. 40 

Public. 40 

Private. 30 
Private. 16 
Public. 40 

Public. 30 and 35 
Private, about 20 
Public. 60 

Private. 10 
Public. 40 

Public. 30+ 

Public. 30 

Public. 40 

Public. 40 

Public. 40 

Public. 40 

Public. 30 



Somerville ave. Lowell st. 
Broadway Penn. ave. 

Broadway Penn. ave. 

Holland st. Broadway 

Beacon st. Park st. 



Pearl st. 
Fellsway west 
Temple st. 
Bond St. 
Walnut St. 
Pearl st. 
Holland st. 
Sycamore st. 
Montrose st. 
Lawrence rd. 
Newton St. 
Morrison ave. 
Washington st. 
Joy St. 

Broadway 
Broadway 
Blakeley ave. 
Kent St. 
Somerville ave. 
Fitchburg R. R. 
College ave. 
College ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Broadway 
Lowell St. 
Washington st. 
Meacham road 
School St. 
Tufts St. 
End of above 

Hawkins st. 



RadclifCe road 
Temple st. 
Bond St. 
Edgar ave. 
Easterly 
Oilman st. 
Howard st. 
Jerome st. 
Jerome ct. 
Mystic Val. py 
Lincoln pky 
Broadway 
Poplar St. 
Southwesterly 



Public. 
Pubhc. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 



Walnut road Private. 
Blakeley ave. Public. 
Middlesex ave. Private. 
Northerly Private. 

Fitchburg R. R Public. 
Beacon st. Public. 

Billingham st. Public. 
Boston ave. Public. 
Southwesterly Private. 
Medford line Private. 
Craigie st. Private. 

Fitchburg R. R. Private. 
Cambridge line Public. 
Granite st. Public. 

N'E' hne Est. 37Public. 
Oliver st. Private. 



Church St. 



Public. 



40 
40 
40 
40 
40 

40 
40 
45 
40 
20 
40 
40 
10 
20 
40 
40 
45 
30 
16 

30 
40 
40 
about 25 
40 
25 
40 
40 
20 
40 
40 
25 
40 
40 
40 
40 

40 



1,499 
284 
632 



196 
1,081 

2', 696 

'637 
200 
517 
653 
431 
445 
2.760 
117 

802 
427 
384 
1.180 
685 

320 
1.182 
1,005 

395 

'283 
534 



458 
1,718 
1.121 



455 



292 

386 

322 

2,554 



647 
379 
461 



840 



230 

149 

678 

ioi 

108 



150 
151 



150 

ioo 



80 



150 
125 
495 



168 
338 

i*,i56 

420 



180 

5 

303 

400 



464 



Lamson ct. Linwood st. Poplar st. Private. 20 .... 370 

Landers School st. Westerly Public. 40 228 

Langmaid ave. Broadway Heath st. Public. 30 353 

Latin way Talbot ave. Professors row Private. 60 250 

♦Proposed. 

tRoadway (only) accepted 30 feet wide, full width of street 70 feet. 



CITY ENGINEER. 



2So 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street From 



To 



Public 

or 
Private 



of Public and 



Length 



Width 

in 
Feet Public Private 



Laurel ave. 
Laurel 

Lawrence road 
Lawson ter. 
Lee 
Leland 
Leon 

Leonard pi. 
Leonard 
Lesley ave. 
Leslie pi. 
Lester ter. 
Lewis 

Lexington ave. 
Lexington ave. 
Lexington ave. 
Liberty ave. 
Liberty rd. 
Lincoln ave. 
Lincoln pky 
Lincoln pi, 
Lincoln 
Linden ave. 
Linden circle 
Linden pi. 
Linden 
Line 

Linehan ct. 
Linwood pi. 
Linwood 
London 
Loring 

Louisburg pi. 
Lovell 

Lowden ave. 
Lowell 
Lowell 

Lowell circle 
Lowell ter. 

Madison 
Magnus ave. 
Main 

Maine ave. 
Maine ter. 
♦Maiden 
Mallet 
Malloy ct. 
Malvern ave. 
Mansfield 
Maple ave. 
Maple pi. 
Maple 

Mardel circle 
Marion 
Marshall 
Mason 
May pi. 
McCarroll ct. 
McCulphe pi. 
McGregor ave. 

Meacham road 

Meacham 

Mead 

Medford 

Medford 

Melrose 

Melvin 

Merriam ^ye. 

Merriam 

•Proposed. 



Laurel st. 
Somerville ave, 
Medford line 
Putnam st. 
Medford st. 
Washington st. 
Concord ave. 
Joy St. 
Broadway 
Highland ave. 
Highland ave. 
Meacham road 
Magnus ave. 
Willow ave. 
Hancock st. 
Angle 
Broadway 
Morrison ave. 
Lincoln st. 
Washington st. 
Lincoln ave. 
Broadway 
Elm St. 
Linden ave. 
Linden ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Washington st. 
Linwood st. 
Linwood st. 
Somerville ave. 
Linwood st. 
Somerville ave. 
Autumn st. 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Somerville ave. 
Summer st. 
Lowell St. 
Lowell St. 

School St. 
Washington st. 
Broadway 
Myotic ave. 
Maine ave. 
Mystic ave. 
Willow ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Cameron ave. 
Somerville ave. 
School St. 
Marshall st. 
Poplar St. 
Spring St. 
Concord ave. 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Hawkins st. 
Clyde St. 
Medford st. 
Wigglesworth 

St. 

Dover st. 
Mt. Vernon ave. 
Cameron ave. 
Cambridge line 
Central st. 
Mystic ave. 
Broadway 
Merriam st. 
Washington st. 



Northwesterly 
Summer st. 
Mystic Val. py 
Easterly 
Richdale ave. 
Dane ave. 
Dickinson st. 
Northeasterly 
Pow. House Bd. 
Lexington ave. 
Northerly 
Northwesterly 
Easterly 
Hancock st. 
Angle 
Cedar st. 
Appleton St. 
Liberty ave. 
Mt. Vernon st. 
Perry st. 
Northerly 
Perkins st. 
Cedar ave. 
Southeasterly 
Northwesterly 
Charlestown st. 
Cambridge line 
Chestnut st. 
Southwesterly 
Washington st. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Osgood St. 
Easterly 
Electric ave. 
Foskett St. 
Summer st. 
Medford st. 
Westerly 
Northwesterly 

Sycamore st. 
Southerly 
Medford line 
Penn. ave. 
Southeasterly 
Melrose st. 
Liberty ave. 
Merriam ave. 
Yorktown st. 
Washington st. 
Southeasterly 
Maple ave. 
Medford st. 
Northwesterly 
Dimick st. 
Pearl st. 
Pow. House Bd. 
Easterly 
Southwesterly 
Easterly 
Walnut St. 

Cambridge line 
Medford line 
Moore st. 
Central st. 
Broadway 
Fellsway 
Bonair st. 
Malloy ct. 
Somerville ave. 



Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

.Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Priv. 11 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

.Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 



18 

40 

40 
5 

40 

40 

40 

13 + 

40 

40 

12 

20 

40 

50 
45 to 40 

40 

40 

16 

30 

40 
9 

40 

45 

24 

20 

33 

33 
about 15 
about 12 

50 

40 

40 

13 

40 

40 

36 

40 
and 27.5 

20 

40 
40 
50 
40 
32 
50 
40 
30 
40 
40 
40 

5 
30 

8 
40 
40 
40 
12 
25 
10 
13 



983 



385 
359 
155 

'456 
333 



624 

147 

578 

1,493 

'478 
1,520 

'550 
1,413 



587 
1,727 



2,114 

'413 

*385 
1,247 
1,259 
3,472 



891 

966 
379 

205 

657 

'416 
735 



699 

1,141 

1,650 

681 



40 
40 
40 
50 
55 
50 
40 
15 
40 



1,060 

777 

8*047 
1,985 

' 487 

'360 



125 

585 
200 



98 



75 
190 
416 



200 



120 



120 
160 



200 
150 

340 

'96 



143 
150 



509 

1,360 
*255 



300 
125 

HO 



100 

75 

110 

302 



340 

2',3i6 
'255 



286 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 

Merriam 
Michigan ave. 
fMiddlesex ave. 
Milk pi. 
Miller 
Milton 
Miner 

Minnesota ave. 
Mondamin ct. 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Montgomery av, 
Montrose ct. 
Montrose 
Moore 
Moreland 
Morgan 
Morrison ave. 
Morrison ave. 
Morrison pi. 
Morrison pi. 
Mortimer pi. 
Morton 
Mossland 
Mountain ave. 
Mountain ave. 
Mousal pi. 
Mt. Pleasant ct 
Mt. Pleasant 
*Mt. Vernon av 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Vernon 
Munroe 
Munroe 
Murdock 
Murray 
Museum 
Myrtle ct. 
Myrtle pi. 
Myrtle 
Mystic ave. 
ttMystic ave. 
Mystic 

JMystic Valley 
Parkway 

Nashua 
Nevada ave. 
Newberne 
Newberne 

Newbury park 

Newbury 

N. Hampshire 

ave. 
Newman pi. 
Newton pi. 
Newton 
Newton 
Norfolk 
North 

North 

North Union 
Norton 
Norwood ave. 



From 

Somerville ave. 
Broadway 
Mystic ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Sacramento st. 
Orchard st. 
Vernon st. 
Broadway 
Ivaloo st. 
Central st. 
End of above 
Broadway 
Montrose St. 
School St. 
Holland st. 
Main st. 
Beacon st. 
Cedar st. 
Willow ave. 
Morrison ave. 
Morrison pi. 
Marshall st. 
Glen st. 
Somerville ave. 
Porter st. 
End acptd part 
No. Union st. 
Perkins st. 
Broadway 
Meacham st. 
Washington st. 
Pearl st. 
Perkins st. 
Walnut st. 
End of above 
Cedar st. 
Washington st. 
Beacon st. 
Myrtle st. 
Myrtle st. 
Washington st. 
Charlest'n line 
Union st. 
Benedict st. 
Medford line 



Richardson st. 
Village St. 
Appleton st. 
Morrison ave. 

Newbury st. 
Holland st. 

Mystic ave. 
Cedar st. 
Newton st. 
Prospect St. 
Webster ave. 
Webster ave. 
Broadway 

Medford line 

b. 17 
Mystic ave. 
Nashua st. 
Broadway 



To 

Charlestown st. 
P<^nn. ave. 
Fellsway 
S'outhwesterly 
Beacon st. 
Cambridge line 
Ames st. 
Penn. ave. 
Harrison st. 
Westerly 
Harvard st. 
Wellington ave. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Sycamore st. 
Mead st. 
Mystic ave. 
Park St. 
Willow ave. 
College ave. 
Northerly 
Easterly 
"Walter st. 
Knowlton st. 
Elm St. 

"v Linden ave. 
Uinden ave. 
B. & M. R. R. 
Southwesterly 
Perkins st. 
Mystic ave. 
P'^arl St. 
Perkins st. 
Bi'oadway 
Easterly 
Boston St. 
Clyde St. 
Southerly 
Cambridge line 
Easterly 
Westerly 
Perkins st. 
Union st. 
Medford line 
Mystic ave. 
Arlington line 



Public 

or 
Private 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 
Prvate. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Public. 
Piivate. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public. 
Private. 
Private. 
Public. 
Private. 
Private. 
Public. 
Public. 
Public 
Public. 
Public. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 

30 510 

40 470 

60 2,304 

about 30 100 

33 46S 

223 .... 

244 

525 



P.. & L. R. R. 
Hanson st. 
Morrison ave. 
Arlington Br. 

R. R. 
Southeasterly- 
Cambridge line 

Penn. ave. 
Southeasterly 
Easterly 
Webster ave. 
Concord ave. 
Cambridge line 
Medford line 

b. 17 
Medford line 

b. 18 
Northeasterly 
Southeasterly 
Medford st. 



Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 
Private. 
Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public 
Private. 
Private. 
Public. 



40 
40 
40 
25 
40 
35 
40 
12 
40 
40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
20 
15 
20 
40 
40 
22 
22 
20 
40 
33 
50 
40 
50 
40 
40 
50 
30 
30 
40 
10 

20+ 

40 

60 

66 

40 

60 



35 
20 
40 



40 
55 
40 



267 

'265 

'886 

695 

1,471 

377 

1,366 

1,690 



287 
377 
280 



584 

'600 

473 

590 

375 

1,214 



164 



1,423 
378 

6,938 
336 

2,530 



637 
'266 

1,260 

406 



40 

15 

about 10 .... 

25 470 

40+ 637 

40 283 

40 1,961 



Oak Circle Cambridge line Northerly Private. 

♦Proposed. 

ttState Highway Austin St. to Medford line. 
tState Highway. 
JMetropolitan Park Commission Boulevard. 



37 to 42 
30 
20 
40 

30 



649 



350 



250 

'206 

iio 



190 
175 
280 



30 
200 
260 

"764 



900 
250 

ioo 

120 



200 



173 
68 



100 
100 



600 
200 



35 



CITY ENGINEER. 



287 



table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 

Oak 

Oak 

Oak St. pi. 

Oak ter. 

Oakland ave. 

Olive ave. 

Olive sq. 

Oliver 

Orchard 

Osgood 

Ossipee road 

Otis 

Oxford 

Oxford 

Packard ave. 
Packard ave. 
Palmer ave. 
Park ave. 
Park pi. 
Park pi. 
Park 
Parkdale 
Parker pi. 
P'lrker 

Partridge ave. 
Patten ct. 
Paulina 
Pearl 
Pearl 
Pearl 
Pearl 

Pearl St. pi. 
Pearl ter. 
Pearson ave. 
Pearson road 
Pembroke ct. 
Pembroke 
Penn. ave. 
Penn. ave. 
Perkins pi. 
Perkins 
Perry- 
Peterson ter. 
Philips pi. 
Pinckney pi. 
Pinckney 
Piper ave. 
Pitman 
Pitman 
Pleasant ave. 
Poplar ct. 
Poplar 
Poplar 
Poplar 
Porter ave. 
Porter 
Porter 
Powder house 

boulevard 
Pow. house ter. 
Prentiss 
Prescott 
Preston road 
Prichard ave. 
Princeton 
Princeton 
Professors row 
Proposed 
Proposed 
Proposed 
Prospect 
Prosp't Hill av. 



From 

Prospect St. 
Angle 
Oak St. 
Elm St. 
Marshall st. 
Linden ave. 
Lake st. 
Franklin st. 
Cambridge line 
Granite St. 
Mason st. 
Cross St. 
School St. 
Beacon st. 

Broadway 
Professors row 
Franklin st. 
College ave. 
Laurel st. 
Park pi. 
Somerville ave. 
Washington st. 
Porter st. 
Washington st. 
Vernon st. 
Cutter St. 
Broadway 
Crescent st. 
Mt. Vernon st. 
Franklin st. 
Cross St. 
Pearl st. 
Pearl st. 
Morrison ave. 
Bi'oadway 
Pembroke st. 
Central st. 
Broadway 
Wisconsin ave. 
Perkins st. 
Franklin st. 
Washington st. 
Porter st. 
Spring St. 
Pinckney st. 
Washington st. 
Cedar st. 
Beech st. 
Spring St. 
Walnut St. 
Poplar St. 
Somerville ave. 
Linwood st. 
Joy St. 
Porter st. 
Elm St. 

Mountain ave. 
Powder house 

square 
Kidder ave. 
Beacon st. 
Summer st. 
School St. 
Morrison ave. 
Alpine st. 
Lowell St. 
College ave. 
Fellsway 
Fellsway 
Fellsway 
Washington st. 
Medford st. 



Public 
To or 

Private 

Angle Public. 

Cambridge line Public. 
Northerly Private. 

Northeasterly Private. 
School St. Public. 

Peterson ter. Private. 
Southerly Private. 

Cross St. Public. 

Meacham road Public. 
E'ly & w'ly Private. 
Curtis St. Public. 

Wigglesworth etPublic. 
Central st. Public. 

Cambridge line Public. 

Professors row Public. 
Medford line Private. 
Northwesterly Private. 
Wallace st. Public. 

Easterly Private. 

Northeasterly Private. 
Beacon st. Public. 

Montvale st. Private. 
Northwesterly Private. 
Fremont ave. Public. 
Broadway Public. 

Southeasterly Private. 
Holland st. Public. 

Mt. Vernon st. Public. 
Franklin st. Public. 
Cross St. Public. 

Medford st. Public. 

Northeasterly Public. 
Northerly Private. 

Boston ave. Public. 
Dearborn road Public. 
Southwesterly Private. 
Sycamore st. Public. 
Wisconsin ave. Public. 
Cross St. Private. 

Northeasterly Private. 
Charlest'n line Public, 
Lincoln pkway Public. 
Olive ave. Private. 

Westerly Private. 

Southeasterly Private. 
Perkins st. Public. 

Westerly Private. 

Spring St. Private. 

Belmont st. Private. 

Vinal ave. Public. 

Southeasterly Private. 
Linwood st. Public. 

Joy St. Public. 

B. & L. R. R. Private. 
Northwesterly Private. 
Mountain ave. Public. 
Highland ave. Public. 
Alewife Brook 

Parkway Public. 

Liberty ave. Public. 
Cambridge line Private. 
Highland ave. Public. 
Summer st. Public. 

Boston ave. Public. 

Lowell st. . Public. 
Centre st. Private. 

Curtis St. Public. 

Middlesex ave. Private. 
Middlesex ave. Private. 
Middlesex ave. Private. 
Cambridge line ^Public. 
Munroe st. :^ublic. 



Width Length 

in 
Feet Public Private 



40 
30 
4 
10 + 
40 
25 
about 15 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
35 
50 

60 
60 
20 
40 
30 
20 
50 
40 
20 
35 
40 

8 
40 
37 
50 
40 
50 
20 
23 
45 
40 
25 
40 
50 
40 
20 
40 
40 

7.5 
15 + 
24 
40 
20 
30 
26 
40 
10 
30 
35 
35 
20 
45 
40 

80 
40 
35 
50 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
50 
40 



665 
563 



440 



1,085 
1,567 

l'.375 

1.200 

1,361 

100 

1.758 



467 



1,238 



203 
1,467 

*769 

341 

957 

1,060 

2,^47 

166 

1,320 
1,713 

■436 
1,112 



1,336 
606 



1,186 



543 

"35i 
315 



1,622 
415 

4,560 
585 

I'.iio 

839 

1,191 

648 

2" 666 



2,071 

597 



85 
90 

'i55 
100 



450 



240 
200 

'522 
120 

'566 
150 



100 

iei 
iso 



350 
200 



155 

100 
125 

'46i 
380 
390 

"so 



65 

220 



150 



540 

195 
315 
340 



288 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 



Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street 



From 



Prosp't Hill pkyMunroe st. 
Prospect pi. Prospect st. 

Putnam Summer st. 



To 

Stone ave. 
Newton St. 
Highland ave. 



Qulncy 

Radcliffe road 
Radcliffe road 
Randolph pi. 
Raymond a.ve. 
Record ct. 
Reed's ct. 
Remick ct. 
Rhode Is. ave. 
Richardson 
Richardson ter. 
Richdale ave. 
Roberts 
Robinson 
Rogers ave. 
Roland 
Rose 
Roseland 
Rossmore 
Royce pi. 
Rush 
Russell rd. 

Russell rd. 

Russell 

Sacramento 
Sacramento 
Sacramento 
Sanborn ave. 
Sanborn ct. 
Sargent ave. 
Sartwell ave. 
Sawyer ave. 
School 
School 
Sellon pi. 
Seven Pines av. 
Sewall ct. 
Sewall 
Shawmut 
Shedd 

Sherman ct. 
Sibley ct. 
Sibley pi. 
Simpson ave. 
Skehan 
Skehan 
Skilton ave. 
Smith ave. 
Snow ter. 
Somerville ave, 
Somerville ave. 
South 

Spencer ave. 
Spring ct. 
Spring 
Springfield 
Spring Hill ter. 
Stanford ter. 
Steeves circle 
♦Sterling st. 
Stickney ave. 
St. James ave. 
St. James ave. 
ext. 

•Proposed. 



Somerville ave. Summer st. 



Walnut St. 
Bradley st. 
Cross St. 
Curtis st. 
Broadway 
Oliver st. 
Cutter St. 
Mystic ave. 
Lowell St. 
Richardson st. 
School st, 
Hinckley st. 
Central st. 
Morrison ave. 
Waverly st. 
Washington st. 
Beacon st. 
Somerville ave. 
Bonair st. 
Broadway 
Broadway 

N. Line Ham- 
ilton rd. 
Elm St. 



Bradley st. 
Marshall St. 
Westerly 
North St. 
Southwesterly 
Southwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Penn. ave. 
Hinckley st. 
Northeasterly 
Sycamore st. 
Northwesterly 
Bartlett st. 
Boston ave. 
Boston line 
Lewis st, 
Cambridge line 
Washington st. 
Northeasterly 
Flint St. 
N. line Hamil- 
ton rd. 



Pubhc 

or 
Private 
Pubhc, 
Private. 
Public. 

Public. 

Public, 

Pubhc, 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private, 

Private. 

Pubhc. 

Public. 

Private, 

Public. 

Private, 

Public. 

Public, 

Private, 

Private, 

Pubhc, 

Pubhc. 

Private, 

Public, 

Pubhc. 



Width Length 
in 
Feet Public Private 

40 400 

20 130 

50 1,262 



Northerly Private. 

Cambridge line Public, 



Somerville ave. Fitchburg R. R. 
Fitchburg R, R. Beacon st. 
Beacon st, Cambridge line 

Warren ave. Walnut st. 
Washington st. Northwesterly 
Broadway . Walnut st. 

Cedar st. Cherry st. 

Packard ave. Curtis st. 
Somerville ave. Highland ave. 
Highland ave, Broadway 



Marshall st, 
Cameron ave. 
Sewall St. 
Grant st. 



Northwesterly 
Cambridge line 
Southwesterly 
Temple st. 



Washington st. Cross st. 
Somerville ave. Merriam ave. 



Sargent ave. 
Cutter St. 
Cutter St. 
Broadway 
Dane st. 
Hanson 



Marshall st. 
Northwesterly 
Northwesterly 
Holland st. 
Hanson st. 
Durham 



Pearl st. around to Pearl st. 



Beacon st. 
Jaques st, 
E. Camb. line. 
Union sq. 
Medford st. 
Cedar st. 



Line st. 
Southwesterly 
Union sq, 
N. Camb. line 
Water st. 
Hancock st. 



Somerville ave. Westerly 
Somerville ave. Summer st. 
Concord ave. 
Highland ave. 
Beacon st. 



Cherry st. 
North St. 
Marshall st. 
Elm St. 
Summer st. 



Cambridge line 
Belmont st. 
Northeasterly 
Easterly 
Pow. House Bd 
Schoof St. 
Summer st. 
Northeasterly 



Public, 

Public. 

Public, 

Public, 

Private, 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Pubhc, 

Private, 

Pubhc. 

Private, 

Public. 

Public, 

Private, 

Private, 

Private. 

Private, 

Public. 

Pubhc, 

Private. 

Private. 

Private, 

Private. 

Pubhc, 

Public. 

Public. 

Pubhc. 

Private. 

Public, 

Public. 

Private. 

Private, 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public, 

Public. 



40 

35 

40 

15 

40 

10 

20 

10 

40 

35 

20 

40 

20 

40 

45 

40 

40 

40 

40 

15+ 

40 

40 

40 
40 

40 

40 

40 

40 

30 

40 

35 

40 

40 

50 

12 

40 

25 

40 

40 

40 

10 

10 

10 

40 

30 

30 

40 

25+ 

16 

75 

70 

30 

40 

20 

40 

40 

20 

20 

15 

40 

40 

40 

30 



781 

392 
261 

1,345 



460 
467 

'875 

*582 
1.682 



121 
534 

1,466 

559 



700 

80 
290 
154 
280 

1,075 
427 

l*,96i 
2,500 

"92 

'615 
575 



1,018 
306 



4,325 

6,793 

989 

727 

1,226 

788 



458 
488 
125 



244 

"iio 

105 
100 



135 

iio 



100 

450 



175 



75 



176 

696 

126 
"i96 



310 
250 
100 
100 



414 
540 
200 
120 



200 



67a 
200 
120 

8oa 



CITY ENGINEER. 



280' 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 









Public 


Width 


Length 


Street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private 


Feet Public Private 


Stone ave. 


Union sq. 


Columbus ave. 


Public. 


40 


676 


.... 


Stone ave. 


Columbus ave. 


Prosp't Hill py 


. Public. 


38 


107 


.... 


Stone pi. 


Stone ave. 


Southeasterly 


Public. 


30 


142 


.... 


Strathmore rd. 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


40 


.... 


15 


Summer 


Bow St. 


Elm St. 


PubUc. 


45 


7,900 


.... 


Summit ave. 


Walnut St. 


Vinal ave. 


Public. 


45 


532 


• . . • 


Summit 


College ave. 


Billingham st. 


Public. 


40 


262 


.... 


Sunnyside ave. Walnut st. 


Wigglesworth stPublic. 


25 to 35 306 


.... 


Sunset rd. 


Curtis St. 


Hillsdale road 


Private. 


40 


.... 


658 


Sycamore 


Broadway 


Medford st. 


Public. 


45 


1,275 


• • • • 


Sycamore 


Medford st. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Public. 


40 


667 


• • . . 


Sycamore 


B. & L. R. R. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


35 


722 


• • . • 


Sydney 


Grant st. 


Temple st. 


Public. 


40 


679 





Talbot ave. 


Packard ave. 


College ave. 


Private. 


50 




1,409 


♦Tannery Ex. 


Cambridge line Woodstock st. 














(Ext'n) 


Private. 


40 


.... 


160 


Ta,unton 


Wyatt. St. 


East'y to angle Private. 


30 


.... 


170 


Taunton 


Angle 


Marion st. 


Private. 


20 


.... 


95 


Taylor pi. 


Somerville ave 


. Southerly 


Private. 


15 


.... 


200 


Taylor 


Mystic ave. 


Sydney st. 


Public. 


40 


309 


.... 


Teele ave. 


Packard ave. 


Curtis St. 


Public. 


40 


685 


.... 


Temple 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


66 


1,637 


.... 


Tenriey ct. 


Mystic ave. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


30 


• • ■ • 


400 


Tennyson 


Forster st. 


Pembroke st. 


Public. 


40 


922 


.... 


Thorndike 


Holland st. 


Arlington Br. 










Thorndike 


Arlington Br. 


R. R. 


Public. 


40 


465 


• • . • 




R. R. 


Kingston st 


Public. 


40 


115 


.... 


Thorpe 


Highland ave. 


Southwesterly 


Public. 


30 


468 


.... 


Thurston 


Broadway 


Richdale ave. 


Public. 


40 


1,660 


.... 


Timmins pi. 


Dane st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


3.5 


• • • • 


97 


Tower ct. 


Tyler st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


25 


• • • • 


150 


Tower 


Crown St. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


40 


559 


• • • * 


Tremont pi. 


Tremont st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


about IC 


) 


75 


Tremont 


Webster ave. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


589 


• • • • 


Trull 


Vernon st. 


Medford st. 


Public. 


40 


1,050 


• • « 


Trull lane 


Highland ave. 


Oxford St. 


Private. 


15 


.... 


200 


Tufts parkway College ave. 


College ave. 


Public. 


22 


'900 


.... 


Tufts 


Washington st, 


. Cross St. 


Public. 


40 


982 




Turner ct. 


Franklin st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


20 


. . 


'150 


Tyler 


Vine St. 


Dane st. 


Public. 


40 


'404 





Union 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


40 


345 




Union pi. 


Linwood st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


10 


.... 


*i66 


Upland Park 


Main st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


20 




175 


Vermont ave. 


Mystic ave. 


Penn. ave. 


Public. 


40 


433 




Vernon 


Central st. 


Glenwood road 


Public. 


40 


764 




Vernon 


Glenwood road. 


, Partridge ave. 


Public. 


40 to 30 


1 190 




Vernon 


Partridge ave. 


Lowell St. 


Public. 


30 


434 




Victoria 


Broadway 


Cambridge line Public. 


40 


1,036 




Villa ave. 


Winslow ave. 


Arlington Br. 














R. R. 


Private. 


35 


.... 


200 


Village 


Dane st. 


Vine St. 


Private. 


25 




370 


Vinal ave. 


Summer st. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


45 


1*425 




Vinal 


Richardson st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


20 


.... 


'266 


Vine ct. 


Vine St. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


25 




140 


Vine 


Somerville ave, 


, Fitchburg R. R.Public. 


40 


'540 




Vine 


Fitchburg R. R. 


. Hanson st. 


Private. 


40 




*222 


Vine 


Hanson st. 


Beacon st. 


Public. 


30 


'662 




Virginia 


Aldrich st. 


Jasper st. 


Public. 


40 


405 


.... 


Wade ct. 


Cedar st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


20 




180 


Waldo ave. 


Beacon st. 


Dimick st. 


Public. 


40 


'277 




Waldo 


Highland ave. 


Hudson St. 


Public. 


40 


287 




Walker 


Broadway 


Leonard st. 


Public. 


40 


713 




Wallace 


Holland st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


1,342 




Walnut 


Bow St. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


3,948 




Walnut road 


Walnut St. 


Kenneson road 


Public. 


40 


270 




Walter terrace Walter st. 


Southwesterly 


Public. 


40 


222 


.... 


♦Proposed. 















290 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 









Public 


Width 


Length 


Street 


From 


To 


or 


in 












Private 


Feet Public Private 


Walter 


Walnut St. 


about 100 ft N. 












of Bradley st 


;. Public. 


40 


548 


• • • • 


Ward 


Medford st. 


Harding st. 


Public. 


30 


433 


• • • « 


Ware 


Curtis St. 


Russell rd. 


Public. 


40 


749 


• • • • 


Warner 


Pow. House sq. Medford line 


Public. 


60 


500 


• • • • 


Warren ave. 


Union sq. 


Columbus ave. 


Public. 


40 


663 


• • . « 


Warren 


Medford st. 


Cambridge line Public. 


30 to 40 109 


.... 


Warwick place Warwick st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


15 


.... 


150 


Warwick 


Cedar st. 


Warwick pi. 


Public. 


40 


665 


• • • • 


Washington av. Washington st. Northerly 


Private. 


18 


.... 


350 


Washington pi. Washington st. Southerly 


Private. 


about 7.5 


114 


Washington 


Charlest'n line Franklin ave. 


Public. 


75 


1,060 


• • • . 


Washington 


Franklin ave. 


Fitchburg R. R. Public. 


60 to 100 


3,977 


• • . • 


Washington 


Fitchburg R. R. Cambridge line Public. 


60 


2,344 




Water 


South St. 


Northerly 


Public. 


25 


366 


• . * • 


Waterhouse 


Broadway 


Cambridge line Public. 


40 


987 


> • . . 


Watson 


Broadway 


Fairmount ave. Private. 


40 


.... 


236 


Waverly 


Washington st 


;. Roland st. 


Private. 


35 


. . . 


200 


Webster ave. 


Union sq. 


Cambridge line Public. 


49.5 


1,955 


• • • • 


Webster 


Franklin st. 


Cross St. 


Public. 


40 


1,034 


• • • • 


Wellington ave. Walnut st. 


Montgomery av Public. 


40 


215 


«... 


Wellington ave. Montgomery av 


'. Easterly 


Private. 


40 


.... 


85 


Wesley pk. 


Wesley sq. 


Northeasterly 


Public. 


40 


405 


.... 


Wesley 


Pearl st. 


Otis St. 


Public. 


40 


515 


.... 


West 


Hawthorne st. 


, Highland ave. 


Public. 


30 


192 


• . 


West 


Highland ave. 


Arlington Br. 














R. R. 


Private. 


30 




266 


West Adams 


Conwell ave. 


Medford line 


Public. 


40 


*7i6 


• • • • 


Westminster 


Broadway 


Electric ave. 


Public. 


40 


376 


• • . • 


Weston ave. 


Clarendon ave. 


Broadway 


Private. 


40 


• • • • 


525 


West Quincy 


Bailey st. 


Medford line 


Private. 


40 




291 


Westwood road Central st. 


Benton road 


Public. 


40 


'489 


• • • • 


Wheatland 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


40 


1,364 


• • . • 


Wheeler 


Pinckney st. 


Mt. Vernon st. 


Public. 


40 


269 


• • . . 


Whipple 


Highland ave. 


Arlington Br. 














R. R. 


Private. 


20 


• • • . 


318 


tWhite 


Elm St. 


Cambridge, line 


Public. 




307 


• • • . 


White St. pi. 


White St. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


20 


• • • • 


200 


Whitfield road 


[ Packard ave. 


Curtis St. 


Public. 


40 


687 


.... 


Whitman 


Mason st. 


Packard ave. 


Public 


40 


632 


• • • • 


Wigglesworth 


Bonair st. 


Pearl st. 


Public. 


40 


744 


• • . • 


William 


Chandler st. 


College ave. 


Public. 


40 


381 


. • • . 


William 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


50 


.... 


50 


Williams ct. 


Porter st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


30 


.... 


454 


Willoughby 


Central st. 


Sycamore st. 


Public. 


40 


. 427 


• « . • 


Willow ave. 


Elm St. 


Broadway 


Public. 


50 


3,534 


• . . • 


Willow pi. 


Cambridge line South st. 


Public. 


25 


125 


• • • • 


Wilson ave. 


Broadway 


B. & L. R. R. 


Public. 


20 


307 


.... 


Wilton 


Lowell St. 


Hinckley st. 


Public. 


35 


470 




Winchester 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


40 


• • . . 


"65 


Windom 


Elm St. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


300 


• • • < 


Windsor road 


Willow ave. 


Hancock st. 


Public. 


40 


575 


• . • • 


Windsor 


Cambridge Line Northerly 


Public. 


40 


40 


.... 


Windsor 


End of above 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Public. 


27 


490 


• . • • 


Winslow ave. 


College ave. 


Clifton St. 


Public. 


40 


1,123 


• • . • 


Winter 


College ave. 


Holland st. 


Public. 


30 


402 


• • • . 


Winter Hill cir. 


Broadway 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


25 


• > • • 


177 


Winthrop ave. 


Mystic ave. 


Middlesex ave. 


Private. 


40 


• • • • 


583 


Wisconsin ave. 


Broadway 


Penn. ave. 


Public. 


50 


499 




Woodbine 


Centre st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


30 




46i 


Woodbine Ex. 


End of above 


Lowell St. 


Private. 


35 




212 


♦Woods ave. 


North St. 


Pow. House Bd.Private. 


40 




1,135 


Woodstock 


Victoria st. 


Alewife brook 


Public. 


40 to 32 


'403 


.... 


♦Woodstock 


Victoria st. 


Tannery st. 










("Extension) 


(Ext'n.) 


Private. 


40 


.... 


920 


Wyatt circle 


Wyatt St. around to Wyatt st. 


Private. 


20 


.... 


315 


Wyatt 


Concord ave. 


Lincoln pkway 


Public 


40 


496 


.... 


Torktown 


Cambridge line 


N. E. line 












N. E. line 


Malvern ave. 


Public. 


40 


294 


.... 


Yorktown 


Maivern ave. 


Northerly 


Private. 


40 


.... 


100 


♦Proposed. 














tSidewalk in Somerville. 













CITY ENGINEER. 



291 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Concluded. 









Public 


Width Length 


Street 


From 


To 


or 


in 










Private 


Feet Public Private 


Court 


39 Adams st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


8 


90 


Court 


Albion St. 


Central st. 


Private. 


12 


216 


Court 


11 Albion St. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


9 


178 


Court 


21 Albion st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


10 


100 


Court 


292 Broadway 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


15 


90 


Court 


612 Broadway 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


20 


188 


Court 


Buena Vista rd.Easterly 


Private. 


15 


145 


Court 


Cambria st. 


Northerly 


Private. 


9 


59 


Court 


12 Carlton st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


25 


75 


Court 


112 Central st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


10 


168 


Court 


113 Central st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


20 


150 


Court 


227 Columbia st Northwesterly 


Private. 


10 


117 


Court 


Conlon ct. 


Windsor st. ex 


. Private. 


20 


240 


Court 


36 Craigie st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


25 


126 


Court 


59 Craigie st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


23.63 ... 


129 


Court 


58 Dane st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


10 


70 


Court 


20 Dimick st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


39.25 ... 


136 


Court 


91 Franklin st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


12 


171 


Court 


66 Lowell St. 


Westerly 


Private, 


25 


101 


Court 


78 Lowell St. 


Westerly 


Private. 


25 


101 


Court 


101 Medford st 


Easterly 


Private. 


8 


75 


Court 


Sacramento St. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


25 


318 


Court 


10 Stone ave. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 


113 


Court 


Windsor st. ex 


E'ly and W'ly 


Private. . 


20 


370 




Total 






445,083 


87,128 



Public, 84.296 miles [includes 1.406 miles of City Boulevard and Park 
Roadways, 2.331 miles of State Boulevard (Metropolitan Park Commission), 
and 1.596 miles State Highway]; private 16.502 miles. 

Total length of streets in the city, 100.798 miles. 



292 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE STREET COMMISSIONER. 



Office of the Street Commissioner, 
City Hall, Somerville, January 1, 1920. 
To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — ^ 

Gentlemen : — I most respectfully submit the forty-fourth 
annual report, containing a brief summary of the principal 
work performed by the highway department, by day labor and 
contract, during the year 1919, with recommendations for neces- 
skry additions for the coming year. 

This department has charge of the construction, altera- 
tion, repair, maintenance and management of ways, streets, 
sidewalks and bridges ; the setting out and care of shade trees ; 
the suppression of gypsy and brown-tail moths and elm-leaf 
beetles ; the watering and oiling of streets. 

The advantages of good streets are not confined to the tax 
papers, or to those living in the immediate vicinity of any 
street, but are shared by all who avail themselves of the in- 
creased facilities. 

The prosperity of ruy city depends upon the condition 
of its streets. The influence of good roads toward the devel- 
opment and increase in value of any city will hardly be ques- 
tioned. 

Highway Maintenance. 

Now that the war is over, it is the intention of the United 
States Government, states, counties, cities and towns to spend 
a large amount for road construction and repairs the coining 
years. I hope our city, and I know it will, keeps pace with the 
others in the improvement of its streets and on the same basis 
as last year 'Tay as you go.'' 

The department has done some good work with the cold 
patch preparation in filling holes in all kinds of streets ami 
sidewalks, using 8,291 gallons of Barrett's and 4,272 gallons 
of Headley's mixed with stone or gravel. A supply of this 
preparation is kept mixed at the city yard. It is also handy 
in caring for police reports and emergency calls for streets 
and sidewalks. 

$76,662.52 was expended for Highway Maintenance. 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 293 

Underground Wires. 

The New England Tel. & Tel. Company constructed coti- 
duits on Curtis street from Teele square to Conwell avenue 
and enlarged the conduits on Springfield street from Concord 
square to the Cambridge line. 

Snow and Ice. 

This department removes the snow and ice from sidewalks, 
and sands same when necessary, in front of all public grounds 
and buildings and the bridges made necessary by the abolition 
of the grade crossings. 

11,579.05 was expended for the care of snow and ice. 47 
cubic yards of snow and ice were removed. 12 cubic yards of 
sand and 302 cubic yards of ashes were used in caring for icy 
sidewalks and crossings. 

Crushed Stone. 

The William J. McCarthy Co. furnished 781 tons of local 
crushed rocks at f 1.50 per ton, 60 tons at |1.70 per ton and 
185 tons of fl.90 per ton at their crusher, and 6.615 tons at 
|2.10 per ton on line of work ; Coleman Brothers, 3,800 tons 
of trap rock at |2.20 per ton on line of work. 

I recommend the purchase of a portable crushing plant, 
electric power, to be erected at the city yard. 

Bridges. 

The bridges are in good condition. The Boston and Maine 
R. R. repaired and replanked the Cross street and Walnut 
street bridges. The iron fences and railings to our bridges 
have been cleaned and painted. 

steam Rollers. 

No. 1 roller worked 152 1/^ days. 
No. 2 roller worked 135 1/^ days. 
No. 4 roller worked 122 14 days. 

The old No. 2 roller should be exchanged for a new fifteen 
ton maintenance roller and a scarifier attachment purchased 
for the No. 4 roller. 

Sidewalks Maintenance. 

There are many miles of old brick sidewalks that are in 
poor condition and are continually being patched. There 
should be enough money appropriated in this account to allow 
the department to remove the old bricks and substitute grano- 
lithic. 



294 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

If the city follows out the policy began a few years ago the 
old brick sidewalks in Union square will be replaced with 
granolithic. When this square is finished Davis square should 
be considered. 

7,130 linear feet of edgestones were reset. 2,398 square 
yards of brick sidewalks were relaid. 700 square yards of 
paved gutters were relaid. 

Repairs necessitated by police reports pertaining to defects 
in the sidewalks are charged to this account. 

17,098.87 was expended for Sidewalks Maintenance. 

Street Sprinkling. 

The American Car Sprinkler Co., of Worcester, flushed 
and sprinkled all the main streets and squares, under a con- 
tract of eight hours a day, seven days a week, for |825.00 a 
month and gave good satisfaction. I recommend a contract be 
made the coming year with this concern for a twelve-hour day 
so as to have the squares flushed early in the morning before 
the business houses open. 

I also recommend that all the water bound, as well as the 
Tarvia Macadam, be covered with the cold tar preparation. 

Calcium chloride was used in the winter on the squares 
to keep down the dust to the satisfaction of the store-keepers. 

Dust layers used during the year : — 
146,515 gallons of Tarvia "B" (Barrett's) 
14,283 gallons of Besco Oil. 
^,043 gallons of Fmeralf'. Oil. 
7,753 gallons of McKenna's Oil. 
8,117 gallons of Oilite Oil. 
7,000 pounds of Calcium Chloride. 

This department should have a new auto oiling truck. 
137,684.64 was expended for Street Sprinkling. 

Street Cleaning. 

This department must have the assistance of the people 
in order to have clean streets. Papers and rubbish continual- 
ly thrown into the streets greatly hinder the realization of our 
desire for clean streets and detract from the good appearance of 
our city. No person who has regard for the beauty and good 
repute of his city will throw rubbish of any kind into the 
streets. There is no better test of the civilization of a com- 
munity than the treatment which the streets receive at the 
hands of the people. 

The squares are sprinkled or flushed every morning and 
cleaned every night. 

7,140 cubic yards of street sweepings were removed. 

Ji?2.5,890.70 was expended for Street Cleaning. 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 295 

Suppression of Moths. 

The moth situation in this city is well in hand. Most ot' 
this work is done in the winter, this giving employment to men 
who would be otherwise unemployed. 

All public and private trees are cared for in regard to 
moths. BusheSy vines, fences and foundations, public and 
private are also inspected. 

Very few brown-tail moth nests were found this year, but 
the gypsy moths are increasing in number. If any nests are 
overlooked and the moths develop in the spring, they are ex- 
terminated by spraying the trees with the spraying machine. 

7,590 street trees were inspected and cared tor. 
4.437 private trees were inspected and cared tor. 
315 bushes were found moth infested. 
18 vines were moth infested. 
1,158 fences and buildings on which moths nested. 
■ 31,032 gypsy-moth nests were painted with creosote. 

15 brown-tail moth nests were gathered and destroyed. 
7,242 trees were sprayed by the gasoline spraying machine 
to exterminate the different kinds of caterpillars 
and beetles. 

14,700.00 was expended for the Suppression of Moths. 

Shade Trees. 

There should be shade trees set out by this department to 
replace the dead and dangerous ones that were removed. Shade 
trees are a great improvement to a city. 

The leopard moth has destroyed many of our trees. This 
department has done what it could in destroying the pest, froiii 
the Shade Tree Appropriation which is not large enough to 
make any extended fight against this moth. 

87 trees were set out. 
210 trees were removed. 
352 trees were trimmed. 
115 tree guards and supports installed. 

14,896.59 was expended for the Care of Trees. 



Highways Construction — New Streets. 

Eleven new streets were constructed during the year un- 
der the Betterment Act, by contract with William J. Sullivan, 
viz : — 

Setting edgestones .55c per linear foot. 

Gutter construction $3.00 per square yard. 

Construction of Macadam roadway $1.00 per square yard. 



296 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The city furnished the edgestone and tarvia binder. 
Straight edgestone |1.17 per linear foot. Circles |1.35 per 
linear foot from S. & R. J. Lombard. 

Tarvia binder .lie per gallon from the Barrett Co. 
Six new streets were accepted this year. 
133,175.12 was expended for New Streets. 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 



297 



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298 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Sidewalks Construction. 



The contracts for granolithic sidewalks were let to Denis 
I. Crimmings, William T. Kilmartin and Peter Salvi, of Somer- 
ville, who furnished all material and did the excavation at |2.20 
per square yard. 



Miles of edgestones, granolithic, brick and 
walks in the city : — 



gravel 



Length of edgestones 
Granolithic sidewalks 
Brick sidewalks 
Gravel sidewalks 



145,751 miles. 
51,929 miles. 
71,598 miles. 
24,032 miles. 



side- 



5,263.86 was expended for Sidewalks Construction. 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 



299 






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300 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Highways Construction — Permanent Pavement. 

A contract was let to William J. Sullivan at |3.40 a square 
yard for removing the old granite paving blocks on a gravel 
base, recutting blocks and relaying on a concrete base, joints 
grouted with Portland cement. 

Following is a list showing partial payments on contract. 
Finals are to be paid from the balance of |19,646.00. 

Washington street . Medford St. to Tufts St. . . $7,722 Ofi 

Tufts street . . from Washington St. N. E'ly . 3,114 06 

Webster avenue . Cambridge line to Columbia St. . 5,509 00 

Beacon street . . Dickinson St. to Buckingham St. . 4,010 50 

On all these streets the Boston Elevated Ry. repaired 
their tracks on a concrete base, grouting the paving blocks. 
All service pipes were renewed or repaired before the new pav- 
ing was constructed. 

f 20,355.62 was expended for Permanent Pavement, 

Reconstruction and Resurfacing. 

This appropriation was taken from the tax levy this year, 
wherein years ago it was borrowed on a five year loan, (thus 
the city saved paying the interest). Also under the five year 
loan the streets had to be constructed under specifications ap- 
proved by the Massachusetts Highway Commission. Although 
we are not now constructing streets under Highway Commis- 
sion specifications we are continuing to construct them in a 
first class manner, using from six to eight inches of stone af- 
ter being rolled, two applications of tar binder covered with 
pea stone thoroughly rolled. After the streets have been used 
for travel for two weeks they are covered with a cold tar ap- 
plication and with fine gravel. 

Twenty-six streets were reconstructed or resurfaced by 
day labor at an average cost of |2.00 per linear foot. 

148,645.70 was expended for Reconstruction and Resurfac- 
ing. 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 



301 



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302 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Miscellaneous. 

54 Granolithic driveways constructed. 
50 Brick driveways constructed. 
19 Edgestones dropped. 

6 Driveways extended. 

3 Driveways discontinued. 

1 Driveway relocated. 

1 Granite block driveway constructed. 

Driveways are constructed, discontinued, relocated or ex- 
tended at the expense of the petitioners. 

Length of public streets 84.296 miles. 

Three horses were killed on account of disability and five 
horses were purchased during the year. 

The department maintains its own municipal repair shop 
for different lines of work. 

I have attended meetings of the Committee on Public 
Works and of various other committees of the Board of Alder- 
men, for consultation regarding work and petitions. 

Labor. 



The regular employees were giv-en two weeks vacation and 
all emplo^^ees, twelve months Saturday half holiday without 
loss of pay. Mayor Eldridge increased the pay of all employees 
Sept. 28, 1919, to a minimum daily wage of |3.50 and on 
Nov. 16, 1919, to a minimum daily wage of |3.75, making the 
wages of laborers |3.75, drivers and chauffeurs |3.85, mechanics 
$4.25 and engineers |4.50. 

Eight hours constitute a day's work. 

The city does its own insuring for injured laborers. There 
are ten former employees receiving pensions under the act pro- 
viding for the pensioning of laborers. 

There were during 1919 : — 

150 permits issued to the Cambridge and Charlestown Gas Com- 
panies. 
218 permits were issued to occupy streets and sidewalks. 

65 permits issued to cross sidewalks. 

19 permits issued to feed horses. 

22 street watering complaints and requests, 
171 notifications to other departments and corporations. 

32 accident reports.v 
825 police reports. 

476 brick and granolithic sidewalks repaired. 
885 miscellaneous reports and requests. 

42 drain layers permits. 
693 water department openings. 

88 permits to open streets and sidewalks. 

16 danger signs erected. 

44 new signs erected. 

67 signs repainted. 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 303 



3,438 cubic yards sand and gravel used. 

2,857 cubic yards dirt removed. 

3,021 cubic yards old macadam used. 

1,852 cubic yards of ashes used. 

504 bags Portland cement used. 



Recommendations. 



I most respectfully recommend that the recutting of the 
old granite blocks and replacing them with grouted joints 
on a concrete base, on such streets as Washington street and 
Somerville avenue be continued; that the granite paving 
started on Beacon street be completed ; and that granite paving 
on Somerville avenue from Beacon street to Porter station, 
Cambridge, be constructed. 

A garage should be erected at the city yard and a suitable 
heating plant fol the same. This heating plant could heat the 
several work shops as well, doing away with individual stoves 
and saving coal and labor and reducing fire risks. 

In closing this report, I wish to express to His Honor, 
the Mayor, my sincere appreciation of the valuable assistance 
rendered me and to extend to him my thanks for his counsel and 
support. 

My acknowledgments are due to the Board of Alder- 
men and heads of departments for their courtesy and considera- 
tion in matters pertaining to the business of the city, also for 
the co-operation of all the employees of the department and 
citizens of our city. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Asa B. Prichard^ 

Street Commissioner. 



304 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



City Hall, Somerville, January 1, 1920. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen : — 

In accordance with the provisions of the City Charter, I 
submit herewith the annual report of the public buildings 
department for the year ending December 31,|1919. 

The total valuation of the public property which is in the 
custody of the public buildings department is $3,282,700. 

The total expenditure for the year 1919 for the care and 
maintenance of this property was |173,125.58. 

This amount was expended as follows : 













Care and 






Janitors 


Fuel 


Light 


Repairs 


Totals 


School Buildings 


$48,560 


07 


$27,541 75 


$9,156 29 


$38,843 


44 


$124,101 55 


Electrical Dept. 


144 


00 


266 20 


110 20 


46 


69 


567 09 


Fire Bldgs. 






3.098 53 


2,569 67 


4,382 


52 


10,050 72 


City Home Buildings 






834 21 


473 62 


1,686 


50 


2,994 33 


Contagious Hospital 


426* 


*14 


1,677 88 


840 84 


1,622 


52 


4,567 38 


Highway Buildings 






338 34 


232 43 


346 


58 


917 35 


Central Library 


2,222" 


"ii 


157 00 


992 36 


846 


43 


4,218 50 


West Branch Li- 
















brary 


1,156 


26 


404 52 


447 05 


190 


44 


2,198 28 


East Branch Li- 
















brary 


876 


00 


190 70 


244 17 


254 


53 


1,565 40 


Union Sq. Br. Li- 
















brary 


876 


00 


273 53 


295 71 


103 


15 


1,548 39 


Municipal Buildings 


4,166 


49 


1,077 19 


1,641 15 


3,639 


97 


10,524 80 


Park Buildings 


357 


00 


145 20 


336 37 


364 


19 


1,202 76 


Police Buildings 


1,905 


43 


884 09 


518 44 


487 


46 


3,795 42 


Polling places . 






7 10 


32 56 


434 


63 


474 29 


Sanitary Buildings . 






113 00 


236 80 


612 


96 


962 76 


Sewer Buildings 






34 4« 


39 43 


45 


96 


119 87 


Water Buildings 






470 18 


291 04 


307 


63 


1,068 85 


Bathhouse 


1,202" 


'70 






1,045 


14 


2,247 84 


Totals 


$61,892 


80 


$37,513 91 


$18,458 13 


$55,260 


74 


$173,125 58 



Inspection of Buildings. 



The Commissioner of Public Buildings is also the inspec- 
tor of buildings according to the terms of the charter and as 
such during the past year has made 1350 formal inspections of 
buildings in the process of construction. 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



305 



The following table shows the number of permits issued 
for building operations during the year 1919 : — 



Buildings 
Dwellings . 
Stores 

Dwellings and stores 
Garages 
Storage 
Manufactories 
Sheds 
Offices 
Stables 
Shops 
Banks 
Theatres 
Churches 
Laundrys . 
Miscellaneous 

Totals 



New Buildings 
Alterations 



1 
12 

7 

12 
5 
1 
5 

2 



2 

18 
2 
2 

14 
3 
4 
2 

1 
1 



WARDS. 



3 

12 
3 
2 

15 



4 

10 
3 
1 
13 
1 
2 
4 
2 
1 
3 



5 
23 

3 

1 
24 

1 



6 

23 
2 

37 
4 
3 
3 
3 
1 



7 Totals 

33 131 

5 25 

G 

192 

15 

11 

Hi 

7 



77 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 



G 
9 
2 
1 
5 
1 
14 



46 51 37 43 61 78 125 441 



Totals 



Wood 
34 
191 

225 



Fire resisting 

188 

28 



Totals 
222 
219 



216 



441 



T\rARDS. 



Buildings 
Wood 

Wood and Cement 
Wood and Concrete 
Wood and Metal 
Fireproofed wood 
Brick 

Brick and Concrete 
Brick and wood 
Cement Block 
Concrete Block . 
Steel 
Miscellaneous 

Totals 



1 

28 
1 
1 

2 
6 



2 

27 
2 
2 
1 
1 
4 
5 
3 
3 

1 
2 



3 

16 
6 



4 
26 



5 

30 
6 
1 

3 
5 



10 
4 
1 



6 

28 
4 
4 
1 
1 
4 

1 

27 



7 Totals 
41 196 



23 

13 

2 

4 

3 

2 

27 
7 
3 



The number of plumbing permits issued during 1919 was 
Number of permits for plumbing in new buildings 
Number of permits for plumbing in old buildings . 
Number of buildings in which soil pipes were tested 



42 
23 
4 
18 
26 

10 

79 

27 

6 

2 



46 51 40 40 60 79 125 441 



212 

32 

180 

140 



The total estimated cost of the new buildings and altera- 
tions during the year 1919 was |773,099, while the estimated 
cost in 1918 was $676,470, showing an increase of |96,629. 

The total number of permits issued during the year 1919, 
viz. 441, was 249 more than during the year 1918, when 192 per- 
mits for new buildings and alterations were issued. 



306 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

There has been very little of speculative building oi: 
dwellings going on this year owing to the high cost of both 
labor and materials. 

There has been, however, a considerable number of altera 
tions of dwellings owing to the scarcity of rentals. 

Single family houses have been altered into two family 
houses and some of the larger houses have been altered into 
small kitchenette suites. These types of alterations demand 
very careful inspection and supervision by this department and 
entail considerable more time than new construction. 

On September 1, 1918, the Board of Aldermen of the City 
of Somerville passed an ordinance requiring a fee to be col- 
lected for every building permit issued by this department. In 
accordance with this, fees collected for building permits during 
the year 1919 amounted to §1219.00. 

The Commissioner has under his charge and direction the 
work of maintenance and keeping in repair all of the eighty- 
two public buildings of the city and the grounds in connection 
therewith, all janitors in the city's employ, a force of nine me- 
chanics who perform most of the work of keeping the buildings 
in repair, the inspection of installation and care of all eleva- 
tors, the supervision of construction of all new municipal build 
ings, the maintenance of the public bathing beach and the pub- 
lic municipal baths in the Bennett and Bingham Schools and 
Lincoln Park. 

The various activities in connection with the department 
work require a vast amount of time and attention in order to 
keep the property in proper condition for occupancy. 

Coal. 
As in the past years an invitation for bids was advertised 
for supplying the necessary tonnage of both anthracite and 
bituminous coal for the city buildings for the winter of 1919 
and spring of 1920. 

Several bids were received, some being from local concerns. 
After taking same under consideration His Honor, the Mayor, 
accepted the bid of the Metropolitan Coal Co. for anthracite 
coal, same to be delivered and housed. 

K. K. Pratt Co., mine representative, was the successful 
bidder on bituminous coal. This bid was received by the Com- 
missioner after considerable effort on his part and was at an ex- 
tremely low figure. This coal is delivered direct from the mines 
to the several freight destinations furnished by the Commis 
sioner. 

The Commissioner made a contract at very little in ex- 
cess of that of 1918 with a teaming contractor for teaming 
and housing this coal, and is pleased to say that the coal thus 
purchased and handled was at a considerable saving to the 
city. 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. B07 

Elevators. 

According to an act of the Legislature the Building Com- 
missioner is required to have every elevator in the city in- 
spected yearly and a report of the conditions and necessary 
repairs made to the State District Police. 

Plans and specifications of all new installations of ele- 
vators must be filed in this office and certificates of approval 
granted by the Commissioner. 

During the year 1919, there were 125 elevators inspected 
and 87 orders for repairs to be made, sent to the owners. 

Plans and specifications were filed and applications 
granted for the installation of seven new elevators. 

School Buildings. 

The maintenance and care of school buildings has, as 
formerly, demanded the most vigilant attention from this de- 
partment and the appropriation made for that purpose has, 
I believe, been expended carefully and judiciously. 

Every year just before the summer vacation arrives this 
department sends out a blank to be filled in by both principals 
and janitors of schools of all requisitions and repairs needed. 
These repairs and requests are taken up with the Superinten- 
dent of Schools and taken care of in the order which he sug- 
gests as far as the appropriation will allow. 

First are taken into consideration the requests and re- 
pairs absolutely needed for the opening of schools. Then the 
others are taken up in the order of their importance. This 
in itself is a huge task as the wants of every section must be 
taken into consideration. 

Among the necessary repairs that were taken care of this 
year are the following : 

Seven boilers were retubed. A number of new grates were in- 
stalled and repairs made on 11 other boilers. 

Steam repairs were made in 26 buildings. 

Plaster repairs were made in 13 buildings. 

Plumbing repairs and new installations were made in 18 build- 
ings. 

Mason repairs were made in 10 buildings beside repairs of fire 
boxes of boilers in nearly every building. 

Sixty teachers' guest chairs were recaned. 

Two teachers' couches were recovered. 

Roof leaks and other roof repairs were taken care of on 13 build- 
ings. 

Carpenter repairs, such as: 
Window cords 

Repairing and tightening furniture 

Fitting up one room in Bell, Edgerly, and Glines Schools with 
larger size furniture. 

Ward room of Bell School fitted up for 2 class rooms. 



308 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Painting : 

Glines School has been thoroughly renovated. 

At High School several rooms and office walls and ceilings tinted 
and woodwork varnished. 

At Morse School the walls and ceilings of entire building tinted. 

At Southern Junior High School walls and ceilings of two rooms 
painted. 

2500 desk tops in various schools refinished and varnished. 

All toilet seats finished in white enamel and several school toilets 
painted out. 

Students' chairs in several buildings refinished and varnished. 

At the Boys' Trade School a new addition to the heating plant 
has been installed, thereby doing away with three furnaces and 
equipping the entire plant with a modern heating apparatus. 

The closing of the Girls' Trade School and the removal 
of that school to the High School necessitated considerable 
changes in the latter building, together with the fitting of the 
Matron's room. Also the change of Room 204, a former class 
room, to a book supply room and the fitting up of the same 
with shelves. 

The most pressing needs this year will be the following : — 

That the policy of yard resurfacing be continued so that the 
school yards may be kept sanitary and free from dust. 

That the policy of painting as many school buildings as possible 
during the year be continued. 

Additional windows in the Edgerly School. 

Electric Lighting: There has been in the past year many re- 
quests for additional lighting in the school rooms. This matter met 
the serious consideration of the Commissioner and he is making every 
effort to secure' available funds to complete at least a portion of the 
older buildings this year and to continue same until every school is 
satisfactorly equipped. 

Outside enclosed fire escapes on the Edgerly, Morse and Highland 
School Buildings. These buildings are three stories high and the old 
style type of construction with very little distance between stairways. 

New heating and ventilating plant in the Morse School, doing 
away with the present seven furnaces which are in bad condition. 

New floors should be installed in both the Edgerly and Highland 
school buildings. 

Installing direct steam coils thermostatically controlled in the new 
wing of the Brown School, also the Glines and Pope schools and the 
High School Annex. This would mean a great saving of coal and would 
eventually pay for itself. A start must be made this year on at least 
one of the buildings. 

Extending the heat control system in the High School to the 
remainder of the building. 

The third story of the Pope School to be fitted up for a hall. Also 
same to be done at Knapp School with movable partitions. 

Installing motor and doing away with the present engine used 
to run the ventilating fan at the Ball School as this engine is in bad 
shape and would cost as much to be repaired as a new motor. 

Removing the partitions between the fire rooms and coal bins in 
the Bingham, Durell, Morse and Highland Schools and replacing same 
with eight-inch brick walls. 

Continuation of the policy of installing sprinkler systems, doing as 
many buildings as possible during the coming year. 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 309 

Fire Department Buildings. 

There has been considerable work done and many im- 
provements made in the several fire department buildings. 

The Central Fire Station has been further renovated on 
the first floor by painting the apparatus rooms. 

At the Union Square Fire Station extensive repairs have 
been inade on the tower and roof and the exterior of the build- 
ing was painted. 

A new toilet having modern sanitary accommodations 
was completed at Engine 2 house, and other general repairs 
were made. 

The increased cost of fuel, light and labor curtailed a 
great number of the needed repairs during the past year but 
much necessary work was accomplished. 

The most pressing needs for this jeaY will be the follow- 
ing: 

New heating plants in Engine 6 and Hose 8, thu^ doing 
away with old and wholly inadequate furnaces. 

Repairs to Engine 6 house. 

New floor in shop at Central Fire Station. 

Interior and exterior painting and new concrete floor in 
front portion of Ladder 2 house. 

Several other minor repairs are being considered and will 
be carried out as far as necessary. 

I urgently recommend something being done to Engine 4 
house. This building is in such bad shape that it does not 
seem wise to spend any money on repairs and as it is a well 
located building on a good lot of land, I heartily recommend 
it being torn down and a modern building erected on this site. 
There is much material in the present building which could 
be used in the new. 

Municipal Buildings. 

The municipal buildings consisting of City Hall and City 
Hall Annex, are in fair condition generally. 

Considerable new fittings and furniture have been re 
quested by the various departments. 

During the past year new sanitary accommodations have 
been installed in City Hall Annex. The exterior of City Hall 
has been repainted. 

Libraries. 

Very few repairs were necessary at any of the Libraries 
the past year as the buildings are in very fair condition. 

At the Central Library the office and librarian's room 
were repainted and much of the furniture refinished. 



o 



10 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



At the West Somerville Branch Library the roof has been 
repaired and some of the interior finish needs attention. 

There is also quite a little new furniture required this 
vear which must be furnished. 



Water, Highway, and Sanitary Buildings. 

AVater Department buildings are in need of a new heating 
plant, as the old plant which was installed as a power plant 
for the high pressure pumps is not economical and wholly in- 
adequate as a low pressure heating plant. 

The highway and sanitary buildings call for considerable 
repairs. Stall bottoms must be replaced and other repairs 
made. One thing which calls for serious consideration is the 
replacement of glass of which there have been more than 110 
lights replaced this year. 

The recent fire in the incinerator plant has shown us that 
if this plant is to remain it will be necessary to fireproof this 
building in a proper manner; also to equip same with a dry 
sprinkler outfit. This will mean quite an added expense but 
the experience of the past year has shown the necessity of it. 



Hospital Buildings. 

Extensive painting and other general repairs were made 
this last year in these buildings, as follows : 

A new discharging room has been built and equipped this year, 
thus completing a long needed addition. 

Ceilings of kitchen and help's dining room have been whitened. 

A new gas range has been installed in the kitchen. 

The entire furnishings of the T. B. Camp which are of white 
enameled Iron, have been refinished. 

New Rocking chairs supplied for T. B. Piazza. 

A new cement concrete driveway put in at the hospital that per- 
mits coal to be put directly into the building, doing away with carrying 
same, which means a considerable saving. 

There is still much to be done, however, in order to keep 
these buildings in proper sanitary condition. 



City Home Buildings. 

In addition to the general repairs to the buildings exten- 
sive repairs and painting have been made during the past year, 
some of which are the following: 

Five rooms in the dwelling of the superintendent have been 
painted and papered. 

Hospital interior painted and outside stucco work repaired. 

New gas ranges installed. 

New furnishings for nurses' and maids' room. 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 311 

Instantaneous hot water heater connected up with sinks in the 
kitchen. 

A new piazza 79ft. long and 10 ft. wide, has been constructed 
the entire Ipngth of the hospital to enable invalids to get the benefit 
of fresh air in their wheel chairs. This has proved to be a much need- 
ed improvement. 

Keqiiest has been made by the Overseers of the Poor for 

considerable work to be done this coming year. 

Police Buildings. 

During the past year a large portion of the interior of 
the Station House was repaired and painted. The entire cell 
room was thoroughly renovated, i.e., cells, walls, and ceilings 
painted, and the entrance to cell room and matron's quarters 
thoroughly painted and whitened. 

I urgently recommend a new heating plant be installed in 
the stable and garage in the rear. This is needed to properly 
heat these buildings as the heater in the stable is beyond re- 
pair and there is no heat in the garage. 

Bathhouse. 

The public bathhouse on the Mystic River at Wellington 
Bridge was opened and maintained as usual last year with a 
very much increased attendance, especially of women and 
children. This materially increased the labors of the life- 
guards who, we are pleased to say, met the conditions and no 
serious accidents were reported for the year. 

We were able to secure 400 tons of sand for the resanding 
of the beach which was greatly appreciated by the patrons. 

We hope this year, with the increased outfit, to give bet- 
ter service and expect that the bathing beach will another 
year be taxed to its utmost. 

Park Buildings. 

This coming year the building located in Broadway Park 
will need considerable attention in the way of repairs as the 
building leaks badly and new sills must be installed. 

I heartily recommend the erection of a permanent band- 
stand in Broadway Park as it is fair to assume that we will 
continue to have more band concerts here in the future than 
in the past, and there is no permanent place to have such af- 
fairs in the city. 

There is considerable agitation being made for a new 
recreation building to be located in Recreation Field, West 
Somerville; this building to have toilet facilities for the pub- 
lic and locker and shower-bath rooms for the various athletic 
teams. 



312 . ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Drawings have been made by the Building Commissioner 
for such a building and an appropriation of about |3509 
stands available to be used, but this amount is entirely in- 
adequate and should be greatly increased. 

In General. 

The Commissioner of Public Buildings has had the co- 
operation of all branches of the City Government, including 
His Honor, the Mayor, the honorable members of the Board 
of Aldermen and all the city officials, and desires to thank 
them for their kindly consideration. 



Respectfully submitted, 

George L. Dudley, 
Commissioner of Public Buildings, 



COMMISSIONER OF ELECTRIC LINES AND LIGHTS. 313 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF ELECTRIC 
UNES AND LIGHTS. 



Somerville, Mass., January 1, 1920. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville. 

Gentlemen : — 

I most respectfully submit my eleventh annual report as 
Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights for the year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



Inspection of Wiring in Buildings. 

While electrical installations have somewhat increased 
over last year they do not approach the normal of former years. 
This can be accounted for by increased cost of labor and ma- 
terials and inability to secure much of the material used in 
liouse wiring. However, this condition does not lessen the work 
of the inspection department as the connecting of unapproved 
wiring to existing installations by inexperienced persons still 
continues and defects are found in almost all such cases when 
trouble occurs bringing such unauthorized attachments to the 
notice of the Inspector. Carelessness and ignorance on the part 
of those charged with the responsibility of installing, operating 
and maintaining electrical wiring and apparatus must be held 
accountable for much of the danger to persons and property 
caused by electricitv. 

The practice of attaching flat-irons, cooking utensils an<l 
other such appliances to lamp sockets and the careless use 
of the same are the cause of many fires. Electrical appliances 
in the United States at present produce an average of 100 fires 
a day. Separate circuits should be run to supply any of the 
above named appliances and should be properly fused. 

No person or persons can engage in the business of install- 
ing electrical wires or appliances except those having a State 
License and when such licensed persons do work which does not 
conform to standard requirements complaint is made to the 
Licensing Board and offender's license is suspended or revoked. 



314 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The ordinance passed Jul}' 1, 1918, requiring permits to be 
obtained to do work in the City has been a great help in keep- 
ing the inspections down to a minimum. 

Number of notification of new work . . . . 1109 

Number of inspections of new work . . . . 1109 

Number of re-inspections of new work . ' . . 459 

Number of inspections of old work .... 250 

Number of defective installations of old work . . 6 

Number of defective installations remedied . . 6 

Number of re-inspections of old work ... 6 



Total number of inspections .... 

Number of permits issued to the Edison Electric II 
luminating Company for installing meters, lamps 
etc. ........ 

Number of permits issued to the Maiden Electric Com 
pany 



1836 

1640 
1 



Fire Alarm System. 

The Fire Alarm System is in first class condition and is 
giving excellent service, being rated as one of the best systems 
in the State. 

252 bell alarms have been received and transmitted during 
the year. 

Over the central telephone desk with connections to eacii 
Fire Station 407 calls for fire have been received and telephone 
alarms sent to the different stations. 

3 A. D. T. alarms have been received at headquarters and 
transmitted over our own system to the fire stations. 

Some changes in the method of sending out alarms will 
necessarily be made on account of the adoption of the two pla- 
toon system in the fire department. The preliminary blow now 
sounded before alarm will be discontinued. 

One blow will be struck on inside bells in all fire stations 
at 8 A. M. and 6 P. M. to announce the change of day and niglit 
forces. 

The central office equipment consists of the following : 

2 — 6 circuit operating boards. 
1 — 5 circuit tapper board. 

1 — 5 circuit gong board. 

2 — 16 circuit storage battery charging boards. 
1 — 32 circuit protector board. 

1 — 12 circuit automatic repeater. 

1 — 1 dial, 4 number manual transmitter, 

2 — 5 circuit punching registers. 

13 punching registers and take up reels. 

2 automatic time and date stamps. 

1 master clock. 

940 cells storage battery. 

5 — 10 foot, 4 shelf battery racks. 

4 metropolitan tappers and 2 gongs. 



COMMISSIONER OF ELECTRIC LINES AND LIGHTS. 315 

The apparatus outside of the central office consists of the 
following: 

131 signal boxes. 

8 tower strikers. 
45 gongs. 

10 punching registers. 
20 tappers. 
1 automatic steam whistle. 

9 private telephones. 

About 60 miles of overhead wires. 
About 78 miles of underground wires. 

There have been run 8600 feet of new overhead wire. 

No new underground wires were installed last year but 
provisions are made to continue '•he work during tha present 
year. 

Police Signal System. 

The police signal system is giving the same service as in 
the past. 

Boxes have been thoroughly tested and found to be in good 
working order. Some replacements may have to be made this 
year on account of wear. 

The system consists of the following : 

1 — i circuit police desk. 

59 street signal boxes. 

4 special boxes. 

About 19 1/^ miles of overhead wire. 

About 13 miles of underground wire. 



Supervision of Poles and Wires on the Streets. 

The same attention has been given to the condition of poles 
and wires on the streets as in previous years. A number of de- 
fective poles have been replaced by companies owning the same. 
New poles have been placed in locations granted for the purpose 
of supplying lighting and telephone service and abandoned 
poles have been removed. 



New England Telephone & Telegraph Co 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co. . 

Boston Elevated ..... 

Permits given to the New England Tel. & 
Tel. Co. for attachments to the Edison 
Company's poles .... 294 

Permits given to the Edison Electric 111. Co. 
for attachments to the New EJngland 
Tel. & Tel. Company's poles ... 93 



New 


Re- 


Re- 


Re- 


poles. 


placed. 


moved. 


set, 


4 


23 


5 


11 


26 


220 


2 


4 


1 


.... 


1 


• ••• 



316 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Street Lighting. 

The matter of street lighting has had the same attentioii 
as in previous j^ears, and additional lights have been placed in 
various parts of the city. 

More lights are required in the western part of the city 
as some new streets are inadequately lighted. 

Our contract with the Edison Company for street lighting 
having expired, the cost of street lighting will be materially in- 
creased, necessitating economy in the placing of new lights. 

Spot lights have been installed at several places where 
traffic officers are posted and are of great assistance to the 
officers. 
• 

Recommendation. 

I respectfully recommend that an assistant inspector be 
employed to enable the department to more thoroughly cover 
all old installations of electrical wiring in the City. 

Conclusion. 

I wish to thank His Honor, the Mayor, the members of the 
Board of Aldermen and the several departments for the many 
courtesies received. 



Respectfully yours, 

Walter I. Fuller, 
Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights. 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



317 



REPORT OF SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



City Hall^ Somerville, 

January 31, 1920. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville. 

Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to submit to you the report of the Sani- 
tary Department for the year 1919. 



Collection of Ashes and Paper. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 



Ashes 


Paper 


(Cubic Yards) 


(Cubic Yards) 


10,970 


2,860 


11,900 


2,760 


14,280) 


2,980 


12,900 


2,980 


11,487 


3,120 


9,010 


2,980 


7,860 


3,100 


7,140 


2,760 


6,200 


2,900 


6,340 


2,540 


7,560 


2,500 


10,220 


2,840 



115,867 



34,320 



During the year the Sanitary Department paid to the 
Highway Department |4,202.02 for the use of teams. Col- 
lections of garbage amounted to 2,247 cords, all of which was 
disposed of at the department yard. During the year the in- 
cinerator was destroyed by fire and the paper and other com- 
bustible material is now being carried to the dump. 



Departmental Revenue. 



Sale of garbage 
Use of incinerator 



$15,884 40 
1,380 00 



Total 



$17,264 40 



318 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



The equipment and its valuation follows 



Horses 

Vehicles 

Harnesses, blankets, etc. 

Stable equipment, etc. . 

Fittings in blacksmith shop 



$10,400 


00 


13,675 


00 


2,665 


00 


300 


00 


75 


00 


$27,115 


00 



Again I wish to call your attention to the condition of the 
dumping privileges in the city. There is no public dump 
within the city limits and the only dump now in use by this 
department is located on Mystic avenue at the foot of Temple 
street. This dump is on private land and the city is paying six 
hundred dollars a year for the privilege of dumping there and 
it is fast filling up. All of the collections of rubbish are 
dumped on private land. Some provision should be made in 
the near future to care for the disposal of refuse. 

In conclusion I wish to thank the members of the City 
Government for their co-operation the past year and the em- 
ployees of the department for the faithful performance of their 
duties. 



Kespectfully submitted, 
Edgar T. Mayhew, 

Supt. of Sanitary Department. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 310 



SOMERVILLE WATER WORKS. 



SOMERVILLE, MIDDLESEX CO., MASSACHUSETTS. 

Settled, when part of Charlestown, 1630. 
(Home of Colonial Governor John Winthrop). 
Incorporated a town, 1842. 
Established a city, 1872. 



Location: Somerville City Hall (near centre of the city) is 2% miles 
northerly from State House in Boston. 

Greatest extent of the City north and south about 4.2 miles. 

Greatest extent of the City east and west about 2.1 miles. 

Elevation Highland avenue at City Hall 105 feet above mean low water. 

Lowest building elevation in the city 13 feet. 

Highest building elevation in the city 145 feet. 

Area of city, including land and water, about 4.22 square miles. 

Land, 2,461.50 acres; water and marsh, 238.50 acres. 

Population 1915, census, 86,854. 

Present population, estimated, 95,000. 

Entire population on line of pipe and supplied with water. 



Water works owned by City of. Somerville. 

Construction commenced in 1868. 

Source of supply: Metropolitan system, taking water of the Nashua 

river at Clinton, Mass. 

Range of pressure on street mains : 
Low service 35 to 65 pounds. 
High service 45 to 100 pounds. 



Mayor. 

Hon. CfeARLES W. Eldridge. 

Water Commissioner. 

Frank E. Merrill. 



Office of the Water Department. 
Room 10, City Hall. 



Department Buildings and Yard. 
Cedar street, near Broadway. 



320 \ AN'NUAL REPORTS. 



ADMINISTRATION OF WATER WORKS 
VESTED AS FOLLOWS: 



1868 — 1871 

SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER COMMITTEE (5) 

Acts 1868; Chap. 202 



1872 — 1890 

SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD (5) 

Acts 1871; Chap. 182 



1891 — 1897 

SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD (3) 

Acts 1890; Chap. 218 



1898 — 1899 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS (3) 

Acts 1898; Chap. 33 



1900 — 
WATER COMMISSIONER (1) 
Acts 1899; Chap. 240 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



321 



REPORT OF THE WATER COMMISSIONER. 



Office of the Water Commissioner, 

January, 1920. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

I present herewith my report for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1919, this being the forty-sixth annual report of the 
water department and my twentieth as water commissioner :— 



Revenue and Expenditures. 

Water bills have been issued as follows 

"Annual" water charges, amounting to . 
"Additional" water charges, amounting to . 
"Metered" water charges, amounting to 



Abatements and refunds on 
above charges . 



Annual and 
Additional 

$1,034 96 



Income from sale of water . 
Receipts; water service assessments 
Receipts; labor and materials sold:- 
Miscellaneous accounts . 



Total income of water works . 
This amount was used as follows 
For water works purposes : — 



Metered 
$254 82 

$2,113 67 
3,559 31 



$42,322 00 

2,183 50 

199,655 57 



$244,161 07 



1,289 78 



$242,871 29 



5,672 98 

$248,544 27 



Under Control of the Water Commissioner. 



Water works maintenance $49,933 61 
Water works extension . 6,186 41 

Miscellaneous accounts . 3,559 31 



$59,679 33 



Not Under Control of the Water Commissioner. 

Interest on water loan bonds . . . $240 00 

Maturing water loan bonds . . . 4,000 00 

Metropolitan water works assessment . 128,082 90 

Maintenance water works buildings . 865 01 



$192,867 24 



322 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



For other municipal purposes : — 

Not Under Control of the Water Commissioner. 



Surplus . 



$55,677 03 
$248,544 27 



In addition to the appropriations from water income to 
other municipal purposes enumerated above, water has bee a 
furnished without charge to all the city departments that have 
required its use and it is paid for out of the income from sale 
of water. 



Department Receipts and Disbursements. 
WATER MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT. 



Dr. 



Amount appropriated by board of alder- 
men ...... 

Department accounts; receipts 

Water works extension account; receipts 

Amount expended for labor and materials 
for operation, maintenance, and re- 
newal of the water works . 

Amount expended for materials used in 
extension of the water works . 

Miscellaneous accounts .... 

Labor and materials furnished municipal 
departments ..... 

Balance: 

Transferred to other municipal de- 
partments by board of aldermen . 
Unexpended ..... 



$49,933 61 

4,318 12 

3,559 31 

685 43 



3,000 00 
757 08 

$62,253 55 



Cr. 

$57,250 00 

685 43 

4,318 12 



$62,253 55 



WATER WORKS EXTENSION ACCOUNT. 



Amount appropriated by board of alder- 
men ...... 

Amount expended for labor and materials 
used in extension of the water works 

Balance: unexpended .... 



Dr. 


Cr. 




$7,000 00 


$6,186 41 
813 59 




$7,000 00 


$7,000 00 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 323 

Cost of Water Works. 

The total cost of water works on December 31, 1918 
as represented by the expenditures from appropria- 
tions for water works extension was . . . $1,067,010 38 

Expended during the year 1919, on extension account . 6,186 41 



Total expenditures, December 31, 1919 . . . $1,073,196 79 

Water Debt. 

Water loan bonds have been issued on funded debt ac- 
count to the amount of |1, 017,000 ; this has been reduced by 
11,115,000, leaving the water debt on December 31, 1919, $2,000. 

The outstanding bonds mature as follows : — 

Year Amount 

1920 $2,000 

Water Works Income from 1898 and its Distribution. 

The water income and its distribution from 1898 to 1919, 
inclusive, is shown in the following table : — 

Total water income, years 1898 to 1919, inclusive . . $5,137,532 84 

Distribution: — 

Water Works Account. 

Water Works Construction, Renewal, 

Maintenance and Operation . . $1,279,257 64 



Water bonds ..... 
Interest ..... 

Metropolitan Water Assessments . 
Maintenance Water Works buildings 



272,000 00 

86,495 00 

2,016,294 16 

' 4,862 69 



$3,658,909 49 



Other Municipal Accounts. 



Various municipal departments through 
specific appropriations and general 
revenue account .... $1,478,623 35 



$5,137,532 84 



Water Distribution System — Construction. 
STREET MAINS. 

Approximate number of feet of street mains in 

the city, January 1, 1919, (including hydrant 

branches and blow-offs) .... 541.088 

Feet of street mains laid in 1919 . . . 1,511 

Feet of hydrant branches laid in 1919 . . 55 

Feet of blow-off branches laid in 1919 . . 82 . 



Total feet of pipe laid 1,648 



324 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Feet of pipe removed or replaced 

Net increase in feet of pipe 

Total approximate feet of pipe in the city- 
Total pipe mileage, approximately 



1,091 



557 



541.645 
102.58 



The sizes and lengths of pipe laid and removed are as 
follows : — 





Feet 


Feet 




Feet 


Feet 


Size 


Laid 


Removed 


Size 


Laid 


Removed 


%" 





112 


4" 


109 


283 


11/4" 





108 


6" 


546 


170 


11/2" 





46 


10" 


515 





2" 


287 


262 


12" 


191 


110 



The pipes constructed and replaced during the year are 
as follows : — 



Constructed: — 
Conlon Court Ext. 


6" 


Jaques St. . 


10" 


Russell Road 


10" 


Replaced: — 




Abdell St. . 


6" 


Beckwith Circle (Con..) 


4" 


Cedar St. (Bridge) 


12" 


Greenville Terrace 


2" 


Joy St 


10" 


Joy St 


6" 


Linden Ave. 


6" 


Linwood St. ... 


12" 


Sellon Place 


2" 


Hydrant branches, blow-off 




pipes and waterpost con- 




nections . vi 





Size of Pipe Feet Laid 



100 

403 

53 

108 
27 

110 

175 

59 

4 

279 
81 

112 



Feet 
Removed 



Size 
Removed 



137 



1,648 

Hydrants, Gates, Etc. 

Number of fire hydrants in city January 1, 

1919 

Number set during year .... 
Number removed during the year . 

Net increase in number of hydrants 

Total number of public fire hydrants 
Number of private fire hydrants, January 1, 

1919 . 

Number set by private companies during the 

year ....... 

Total number of private fire hydrants 
receiving their supply from the city 
mains ...... 



108 


11/4" 


46 


iy2" 


110 


12" 


175 


2" 


63 


6" 


279 


4" 


84 


6" 


112 


%" 



114 



1,091 



1,175 



12 

10 



64 





1,177 



64 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



325 



37 



8 
29 



8 

178 

5 



79 
5 



1,85G 



Number of gates in city, January 1, 1919 . 1,827 

Number set during the year for streets . . 11 
Number of section gates set .... 2 

Number set on hydrant branches ... 19 
Number set on blow-off branches ... 5 

Number set on car-sprinkler connections . 

Number of street gates removed . 
Number of section gates removed . 

Net increase in number of gates . 

Total number of gates in city . 
Number of check-valves in city January 

1919 

Number of blow-offs in city January 1, 1919 
Number added during the year 

Total number of blow-offs ... 183 

Number of waterposts in city January 1, 1919 
Number removed during the year . 

Total number of waterposts ... 74 

Number of drinking fountains in city Janu 
ary 1, 1919 

Total number of drinking fountains . 
Number of car-sprinkler connections in city 

January 1, 1919 17 

Number installed during the year ... 

Total number of car-sprinkler connec 

tions in city ..... 17 

Water Services. 
Number of services in city January 1, 1919 

(approximately) ..... 13,514 

Number laid during the year 
Number permanently discontinued 

Net increase in services .... 

Total number of water services in city 

Amount received for services laid in 1919 
Number feet service pipe in city January 1, 

1919 

Number feet laid during the year . 

Number feet discontinued .... 

Increase in feet of service pipe 

Total feet service pipe in city (approxi- 
mately) ...... 

Total service mileage (approximately) . 

Size, ihimber and length of service pipes laid in 1919 : 

36— %"— 829' 7—%"— 480' 3—1"— 56' 1— ll^"— 29' 1—4"— 13' 

Number of fire services installed during 1919 . 1 

Location Size 

Eastern Utilization Co. — Kent St. . . . 4" 



48 
18 


30 
13,544 






? 


2,113.67 


1,407 
592 




466,362 
815 




s, 


467,177 

88. 4S 



32(3 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Water Meters. 



Number of water meters in city, January 1, 1919 
Number installed during the year, new . 
Number reset ...... 



Number removed on account of permanent or tem- 
porary discontinuance of water and for sub- 
stitution of other meters . 

Net increase in number of operating meters 

Number of motor registers in service . 

Total number of meters and registers . 

Per cent, of all services metered . 



10,113 
189 
193 



382 



176 



206 

3 

10,322 

76.21 



Operating Meters December 31, 1919. 



Kind. 








Size. 










%" 


Ya" 


r 


IK" • 2" T 


4- ^" 


Total. 


Nash 


178 


3 

23 
41 

13 
13 

147 
32 


3 

6 
9 

22 

7 
2 

27 
6 




to to to to 


1 

3 

2 


1 
1 


178 


Empire 

Crown 

Gem 

Hersey 

Hersey Disc 

Torrent 

Trident 

Trident Crest... 
Trident Comp.. 

Union 

Union Special- 
Columbia 

Kin? 


4 

3 

253 
524 

13 

40 
662 


3 

1 
5 

1 

1 
4 


2 

1 

4 

6 
2 
6 
3 

1 


4 

16 

1 

9 

290 

1 

598 

7 

10 

36 

16 

40 

662 


Lambert 

Worthington 
Disc 


4,168 
4,039 


4,343 

4,082 


Worthington 

Turbine 

Keystone 


25 




' 




1 
25 


Totals 

Motor and ele- 
vator registers 


9,909 272 


82 


15 I 25 

i 
1 


8 


6 . 


2 


10,319 
3 


10.322 



The meters installed in 1919 were classed as follows : — 

Applications of property owners . . . . . . 62 

New services ......... 23 

General installation ........ 104 

Reset 193 

Total . 382 

Meters were removed for the following causes : — 
Vacancies and temporary non-use of water . . . .68 

Services permanently discontinued ..... 8 

Replaced by other meters ....... 100 



Total 



176 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



327 



Meters installed yearly on old and new services under the 
State Compulsory Meterage law, which requires complete 
meterage of city by the year 1928: — 

Average installation Meters Set in excess Meters 

required on set on of Total set on 

Year old services old services requirements excess new services 

1908 411 755 344 344 147 

1909 411 637 226 570 201 

1910 411 501 90 660 169 

1911 411 528 117 777 200 

1912 411 423 ' 12 789 ° 236 

1913 411 432 . 21 810 255 

1914 411 422 11 821 231 

1915 411 439 28 849 217 

1916 411 434 23 872 203 

1917 411 163 248 (less)* 624 154 

1918 411 82 329 (less)* 295 39 

1919 411 166 245 (less)* 50 23 

* On account of war-time conditions of labor and material. 



The following table shows the progress of meter installa- 
tion of Somerville by years and the results therefrom in water 
consumption : 



Number Number 

Popu- of of 

Year lation Services Meters 

1897 58,000 9,601 

1898 59,000 9,806 143 

1899 61,000 10,053 226 

1900 62,000 10,291 202 

1901 64,000 10,520 224 

1902 66,000 10,710 269 

1903 68,000 10,854 647 

1904 69,000 11,059 1,272 

1905 70,000 11,279 2,092 

1906 71,000 11,489 2,829 

1907 72,000 11,662 3,455 

1908 74,000 11,817 4,333 

1909 76,000 12,018 5,155 

1910 78,000 12,149 5,817 

1911 79,000 12,357 6,533 

1912 80,000 12,596 7,171 

1913 82,000 12,827 7,856 

1914 85,000 13.034 8,499 

1915 87,000 13,233 9,155 

1916 90,000 13,420 9,763 

1917 91,000 13,509 10,028 

1918 91,000 13.514 10,116- 

1919 13,544 10,322 



Per Capita 

Con- 

Per Cent sump- 

Metered tion 

(Est.) 88 

" 88 



.5 

.25 



1. 

2. 

2 

2 

2.5 

6 
11.5 
18.5 
24.5 
29.5 
36.5 
43 
48 
53 
57 
61 
65 
69 

72.75 
74.23 

76.21 



88 
S8 
88 
88 
^>8 
89 
S9 
89 
90 
89 
84 
80 
74 
79 
72 
73 
67 
69 
73 
80 
69 



328 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Summary of Pipes and Fixtures of the Water System 
December 31, 1919. 



Feet of main pipe (approximately) 

Feet of service pipe (approximately) 

Service connections (approximately) 

Public fire hydrants 

Private fire hydrants 

Gates . 

Check valves 

Meters 

Motor registers 

Waterposts 

Car-sprinkler connections 

Blow-offs 

Drinking fountains and troughs 



541,645 

467,177 

13,544 

1,177 

64 

1,856 

8 

10,319 

3 

74 

17 

183 

8 



WATER ASSESSMENTS AND CONSUMPTION. 

The annual assessments paid by this city as its propor- 
tionate part of the cost and operation of the Metropolitan 
water works are given below : — 



Sinking 
Year Fund 

1898 No division 

1899 " 

1900 " 

1901 $12,491 73 

1902 19,014 85 

1903 15,748 56 

1904 16,404 42 

1905 21,358 11 

1906 22,345 50 

1907 „ 25,365 30 

1908 24,865 73 

1909 24,812 23 

1910 25,018 52 

1911 25,424 55 

1912 24,469 82 

1913 24,930 94 

1914 14,190 98 

1915 14,164 65 

1916 13,249 71 

1917 13,364 71 

1918 14,193 89 

1919 13,765 81 



There has been credited to the city by the commonwealth 
as its proportion of the amounts received from entrance fees, 
water supplied outside the district, and water furnished to 
water companies the sum of |9,056.10. 











Maturing 




Maintenance 


Interest 


Bonds 


Total 


made 












$14,250 19 


<( 












20,975 58 


t( 












28,689 24 


$12,033 


79 


$32,291 


24 






56,816 76 


12,955 


64 


30,427 


40 






62,397 89 


12,763 


10 


48,776 


77 






77,288 43 


15,393 


87 


54,938 


64 






86,736 93 


13,666 


71 


55,535 


91 






90,560 73 


17,412 


51 


57,402 


07 






97,160 08 


18,880 


01 


62,089 


30 






106,334 61 


15,221 


12 


68,604 


23 






108,691 08 


21,220 


56 


66,540 


41 






112,573 20 


18,212 


28 


66,825 


45 






110,056 25 


19,573 


82 


69,849 


26 


$246 


66 


115,094 29 


16,111 


70 


68,205 


16 


445 


46 


109,232 14 


20,691 


19 


70,206 


83 


491 


92 


116,320 88 


22,488 


71 


73,138 


81 


180 


63 


109,999 13 


21,376 


07 


74,111 


12 


1,129 


50 


110,781 34 


21,643 


98 


74,058 


98 


1,515 


62 


110,468 29 


28,110 


19 


75,117 


17 


1,833 


60 


118,425 67 


29,185 


04 


79,975 


44 


2,004 


18 


125,358 55 


33,723 


64 


78,335 


58 


2,257 


87 
$^ 


128,082 90 




2,016,294 16 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



329 



The daily consumption of water in Somerville, as recorded 
by the Venturi meters, operated by the Metropolitan water 
works, is shown below by months for the year 1919 : — 



Gallons Gallons 

Month ' per day per capita 

January 7,016,000 75 

February .... 6,529,300 69 

March 6,282,600 67 

April 6,011,100 64 

May 6,170,600 65 

June 6,886,000 73 



Gallons 

Month per day 

July 6,648,500 

August 6,239,800 

September .. 6,586,300 

October 6,448,700 

November .. 6,393,600 

December .... 7,275,400 



Gallons 

per capita 

70 

69 
68 
67 
76 



The consumption for the year was : — 



Liow-service system 1,834,306,000 gallons 

High-service system 553,357,000 gallons 

Total consumption 2,387,663,000 gallons 

Average daily consumption 6,541,500 gallons 

Average daily consumption, per capita, for Som- 
erville 69 gallons 

Average daily consumption, per capita, for Met- 
ropolitan district 95 gallons 

The following table shows the daily per capita consumption 
of water in the cities and towns in the Metropolitan Water 
District for the year 1919, as registered by the Metropolitan 
meters. 



City or Town 


Jan 


Feb 


Mar 


Apr 


May 


June 


July 


Aug 


Sept 


Oct 


Nov 


Dec Year 


Arlington 


62 


62 


59 


58 


62 


83 


81 


63 


58 


53 


50 


52 


62 


Belmont 


55 

120 

69 


58 

114 

66 


57 

107 

62 


59 

105 

60 


61 

107 
61 


74 

112 

65 


70 

112 

66 


53 

110 
66 


53 

114 
65 


49 

111 

64 


52 

107 

62 


56 
120 

70 


58 


Boston 


111 


Chelsea 


65 


Everett 


78 
56 


72 

58 


69 
66 


65 

58 


64 
62 


71 

79 


68 
76 


66 
68 


69 
65 


68 
64 


68 
61 


78 
62 


61 


Lexing-ton 


65 


Maiden 


53 


49 


49 


50 


49 


55 


53 


49 


51 


48 


49 


52 


50 


Medford 


49 

58 


47 
54 


46 
55 


44 
55 


46 

57 


51 
65 


50 
64 


44 
59 


48 
54 


50 
62 


46 
56 


46 
57 


47 


Melrose 


58 


Milton 


39 
55 


40 
56 


41 
54 


42 
68 


47 
98 


46 
198 


40 
252 


36 

217 


42 

180 


44 
119 


44 
66 


48 
61 


4? 


Nahant 


119 


Quincy 


97 
55 

75 


96 
52 
69 


95 
49 
67 


100 
50 
64 


100 
54 
65 


108 
66 
73 


112 

72 
70 


104 
68 
66 


101 
62 
69 


99 
57 
68 


96 
53 
67 


99 
58 
76 


100 


Revere 


58 


Somerville 


69 


Stoneham 


59 


59 


59 


60 


68 


74 


72 


76 


83 


93 


101 


117 


77 


Swampscott .... 


53 


52 


56 


54 


62 


94 


100 


89 


78 


69 


67 


63 


70 


Watertown .... 


117 


119 


108 


103 


96 


112 


99 


92 


98 


107 


107 


101 


105 


Winthrop 


47 


47 


46 


45 


47 


58 


67 


63 


54 


50 


50 


52 


52 


Met. Dist 


101 


96 


91 


90 


91 


97 


98 


94 


97 


95 


92 


102 


95 



The district, in order of consumption, beginning with the 
lowest, stands as follows for the year 1919 : — 

Gallons Per Cent. 



City or Town 
Milton 
Medford 
Maiden . 
Winthrop 
Belmont 
Melro#e . 
Revere . 



Total 


Per Capita 


Services 


per Day 


per Day 


Metered 


401,300 


42 


100 


1,688,500 


47 


100 


2,682,800 


50 


97.29 


792,000 


52 


100 


564,000 


58 


100 


1,057,100 


58 


100 


1,780,700 


58 


78.00 



330 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Arlington 










1,085,700 


62 


100 


Chelsea 










3,158,400 


65 


99.81 


Lexington 










389,200 


65 


100 


Somerville 










6,541,500 


69 


76.21 


Everett . 










2,886,700 


69 


68.85 


Swampscott 










570,900 


70 


100 


Stoneham 










602,400 


77 


99.52 


Quincy 










4,550,100 


100 


90.80 


Watertown 










2,002,900 


105 


100 


Boston 










. 89,652,400 


111 


74.44 


Nahant 










186,900 


119 


75.58 


Total District 








120,593,500 


95 






Consi 


tructi 


on — 


Maintenance — Operation 


. 





Continuance of high cost of materials had a deterrent 
effect on building operations during the past year and com- 
paratively little construction of new mains and services has 
been called for. 

Preceding the construction of Jaques street between Bond 
street and Edgar avenue a 10" main was laid in that portion 
of the street and new hydrant and service connections were 
made with this main. 

The trench work on this job was done by contract on ac- 
count of the inability of the department to secure labor. 

On account of permanent pavement to be laid during the 
year considerable work was done in Washington street be- 
tween Medford and Tufts streets; in Webster avenue between 
Columbia street and Cambridge line; in Beacon street be- 
tween Springfield and Buckingham streets and between Park 
and Sacramento streets. 

Service pipes were renewed, gates were set on hydrant 
branches, waterposts were removed, blow-offs were constructed 
in the several streets, and in Washington street new and larger 
connections were laid across the street for the mains in Lin- 
wood and Jov streets. 

The old 4" main in Linden avenue between Summer street 
and Cedar avenue was replaced with a 6'' main and a hydrant 
installed thereon, in anticipation of new street construction. 

The 12" steel riveted pipe in Cedar street over the bridge 
crossing the tracks of the Boston & Maine railroad was found 
to be in a defective condition and was replaced with a 12" 
cast-iron main. 

The old private service pipes in Sellon place, Greenville 
terrace and Abdell street were taken over by the city throng li 
releases given by the owners of abutting property and new 
pipes were laid to improve the service. 

Other construction and renewal of street mains, hydrants, 
gates, blow-offs, etc., is shown in table accompanying this re- 
port. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 331 

Service maintenance has, as usual, occupied a considera- 
ble portion of our time during the year. 

Water meter installation was brought to as low a point 
as possible on account of the high cost of materials and tiie 
difficulty of obtaining suitable labor, and we closed the season 
with an excess of but fifty meters on our total installation 
required under the Compulsory Meterage Act of the legislature. 
We shall be required to take up general meter installation again 
the coming year in order to meet requirements of the law. 

On account, undoubtedly, of better weather conditions 
than existed in the winter of the previous year the water con- 
sumption has again receded to 69 gallons per capita daily, 
a favorable showing considering our large industrial use of 
water, one of our manufacturing plants alone having paid 
us nearl}^ |30,000 for city water used last year. 

Water receipts for the year show a decrease of about 
.$21,000, due to the cessation of business of one of our largest 
consumers who paid us that sum annually for water. 

The department appropriation accounts show amounts 
unexpended totalling |4,570.67 with all bills paid, while a gen- 
eral revenue surplus of |55, 677.03 is shown after paying all 
expenses and assessments connected with the operation of the 
department. 



Labor. 

Wages of labor were fixed by the mayor during the year 
as follows: 

Common Skilled 

January 1, daily .... $3.25 $3.35 

September 28, daily .... $3.50 $3.60 

November 16, daily .... $3.75 $3.85 

Foremen received corresponding advances in their daily 
wages. Commencing July 4th the laboring force was granted 
pay for all holidays. 

Good labor has been difficult to obtain and the number of 
our working force has been kept at a low figure. 



Pensions. 

There have been no deductions from our pension roll dur- 
ing the past year. The name of Patrick McCarthy was added 
on the 7th of March, to date from January 16th, at rate of 
$8.44 a week, making a total of four names now on the list. 



332 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

War Service Men. 

The three men of the department whose names are given 
in my report for 1917 as having entered the government ser- 
vice happily have all returned from overseas and were restored 
to positions in the department. Two of them have since re- 
signed to take up other lines of work and three service men have 
been appointed, making four of these veterans now on our 
payrolls. 



Improvements. 

More room is needed for our machine and repair shop 
and I advise the early sale and removal of the old high-service 
pumping engine which has been out of use for many years and 
occupies space needed for our meter repair department. 

I also recommend the installation of an up-to-date heating 
system for the department buildings and the removal of the 
old and highly uneconomical steam boiler, formerly the power 
boiler for the steam pump, which now supplies the heat and 
conversion of the space occupied by it into much needed room 
for our repair shop work. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Frank E. Merrill, 

Water Commissioner. 






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WATER DEPARTMENT. 337 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1919. 

In form recommended by the New England Water Works Association. 

SOMERVILLE WATER WORKS 
SOMERVILLE, MIDDLESEX COUNTY, MASS. 

General Statistics. 

Population, census 1915, 86,854; present, estimated 95,000. 
Date of construction: Comimenced in 1868. 
By whom owned: City of Somerville. 
Source of supply: Metropolitan water system. 

Mode of supply: Water is delivered into the city's mains, under 
both high and low pressures, by the Metropolitan Water Works. 

Statistics of Consumption of Water. 

Estimated total population at date, 95,000. 
Estimated population on lines of pipe, 95,000. 
Estimated population supplied, 95,000. 
Total consumption for the year, 2,387,663,000 gallons. 
Average daily consumption, 6,541,500 gallons. 
Gallons per day to each inhabitant, 69. 

Statistics Relating to Distribution System, 1919. 

MAINS. 
Kind of pipe, cast iron. 
Sizes, from 4-inch and under to 20-inch. 

Laid 1,648 feet; discontinued 1,091 feet; net extension, 557 feet. 
Total now in use, 102.58 miles. 
Number of leaks per mile, 0.24. 

Number of hydrants added during year (public, 2; private, 0), ". 
Number of hydrants (public and private) now in use, 1,241. 
Number of stop gates added during year, 29. 
Number of stop gates now in use, 1,856, 
Number of blow-offs, 183. 
Range of pressure on mains, 35 pounds to 100 pounds. 

SERVICES. 

Kind of pipe : Lead ; wrought iron — lead-lined ; wrought iron — 
cement-lined; cast iron. 

Sizes, one-half to eight inche.s. 

Extended 1,407 feet; discontinued 592 feet. 

Total now in use, 88.48 miles. 

Number of service taps added, 48; discontinued, 18; net increase, 
30. 

Number now in use, 13,544. 

Number of meters added, 382; meters and motor registers discon- 
tinued, 176; net increase, 206. 

Number now in use, 10,322. 

Percentage of services metered, 76.21. 

Percentage of water receipts from metered services, 82. 

Number of motors and elevator registers added, 0; removed, 0. 

Number now in use, 3 (included in number of meters). 



338 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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PLANNING BOARD. 339 

REPORT OF THE PLANNING BOARD. 



December 31, 1919. 

To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen. 
Gentlemen : 

In compliance with Chapter 494 of the Acts of 1913, the 
Planning Board herewith respectfully submits its annual re- 
port and recommendations for the year 1919. 

The Board organized for the year by electing William 
F. Riley, Chairman, and David J. Kelley, Secretary, the othei* 
members of the Board being Harrison L. Evans, George J. 
Rauh and Paul R. Valentine. 

In the course of the past year the Board has considered 
the following subjects, and makes recommendations as fol- 
lows : — 

Fire Protection. 

The Board again respectfully calls attention to the urgent 
necessity of establishing Fire Districts in our city. At the 
present time the construction of new buildings is practically 
at a stand still, and ini the opinion of the Board now is the 
opportune time to. take action which will secure our citizens 
against danger from the presence of fire hazards. The es 
tablishment of Fire Districts has already been undertaken in 
our neighboring cities, and Somerville should not lag behind 
in this respect.^ This matter has been discussed by our city 
governments of the past several years, but no progress has 
been made. 

Modern fire-fighting apparatus is being furnished as rapid 
ly as possible, but Fire Districts are very necessary as a safe 
guard to prevent the erection of more wooden buildings and 
to insure a better class of building construction when the 
old wooden buildings now standing in some of the public 
squares of our city have become obsolete. This Board, there- 
fore, recommends that Fire Districts be established, and some 
action taken during the coming year towards the fulfillment 
of this object. 

Street Car Service. 

In spite of agitation by all our citizens the street car 
service still remains a serious problem. The crowded condi- 
tions existing during the rush hours on all the car lines still 



340 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

remains unchanged. In the opinion of the Planning Board 
Somerville is being discriminated against in the matter of fur- 
nishing sufficient cars, and also in the quality of the service 
rendered. The Board recommends that action be taken to se- 
cure better service and more car accommodations by appealing 
to the proper authorities without further delay. 

Public Parks and Buildings. 

The Planning Board recommends that our school building'^ 
be made more accessible for neighborhood gatherings, so that 
our citizens may use them for social entertainments, which 
will help to develop community spirit and civic pride. 

The Board also respectfully calls your attention to the 
necessity of laying out the land now owned by the city be- 
tween Cedar Street and City Road, and known as ''Richard 
Trum Playground'^ as a public park, to insure to the people 
in that section of our city a permanent playground and recrea- 
tion center for all time. 

The Board again recommends that a playground be pro- 
vided on the land owned by the city known as the old City 
Ledge. This would be a great benefit to the Clarendon Hill 
section of our city, and would not be a very great expense 
to the city. 

Somerville Bath House. 

The necessity of making the only bathing place in Somer- 
ville a fit place for the people of our city to go to for pleasure 
and recreation is a duty which should be no tonger neglected. 
The Board recommends that the bathing beach at Wellington 
Bridge be thoroughly cleaned for the coming season, and n 
remedv found for the muddv condition of the beach. 



Bridge Street Widening. 

^ 

As recommended in the reports of 1916, 1917 and 1918 the 
Planning Board again calls your attention to the importance 
of widening Bridge Street at the lower end of our city, and rec- 
ommends that this matter be discussed with our neighboring 
city of Cambridge at an early date. The old houses now 
standing are for the most part unoccupied, and in a dilapidated 
condition, and if taken at their present valuation for widening 
the street, would result in a great saving to both cities, and 
be a valuable and much needed public improvement. 



PLANNING BOARD. 341 

Housing Conditions. 

In view of the abnormal conditions existing, due to the 
shortage of houses, the Board respectfully calls attention to the 
fact that it is authorized under the Act of the Legislature creat- 
ing it to "make careful studies of the resources and needs of the 
city, particularly with respect to conditions injurious to publii! 
health — in and about rented dwellings." It therefore recom- 
mends that all complaints of this nature from citizens be re- 
ferred to it for investigation and report. 

Appropriation. 

The Planning Board received Two hundred dollars for 
1919, and was able to purchase some of the supplies needed, 
but did not use the whole of its appropriation because the 
amount allotted was insufficient to enable it to carry out the 
plans it has in view. It hopes to gradually procure sufficient 
equipment so that it will be in a position to furnish informa- 
tion to the city government, which will be of assistance in solv- 
ing the various municipal problems. 

The Board has been promised office space, but nothing has 
been done, and at present the Board has no definite meeting 
place. This should be attended to without undue delay. 

The Board respectfully requests an appropriation of Two 
hundred dollars this year, and also an office in the City Hall, 
where its records may be kept, and meetings held. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William F. Riley^ Chairman, 

Harrison L. Evans, 

Paul R. Valentine, 

George J. Rauh^ 

David J. Kelley, Secretary. 



342 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Somerville, Mass., February 14, 1920. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen, 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor of presenting to you for 
your consideration the annual report of the lire department for 
the year ending December 31, 1919 : — 



Alarms of Fire. 



Number of bell alarms 
Number of still alarms 

Total alarms 

Number less than 1918 



Value of buildings at risk 
Insurance on buildings 
Damage to buildings 
Value of contents . 
Insurance on contents 
Damage to contents 
Total value at risk 
Total insurance 
Total damage 



252 
410 



$781,500 
437,900 

48,035 
203,090 
116,026 

29,154 
984,590 
553,926 

77,190 



662 
46 

00 
00 
87 
90 
50 
60 
90 
50 
47 



List of Probable Causes. 



Accidental .... 
A. D. T 

Automobiles and Trucks 
Bonfires . . . 

Candle on table . 
Carelessness with matches . 
Child caught in elevator 
Children playing with matches 
Cigars, cigarettes and pipes . 
Closet fires 
Dump fires . 
Decorations in contact with gas 
Defective chimneys 
Electric car . 
Electric flat iron . 
Electric wires 
EJxplosion of powder 
False alarms 



7 
3 
5 

22 
2 
9 
1 

17 

12 
4 
8 
1 

10 
2 
1 
5 
1 

43 



CHIEF ENGINEER FIRE DE1\\RTMENT. 






Filling gas tanks . 

Fire crackers 

Fire in Boston 

Grass fires . 

Heat from dryer 

Hot ashes . 

Incendiary . 

Kettle of fat 

Kerosene lamps and stoves 

Overflow of bathroom tank 

Smoke from automobile 

Smoke from Chimney 

Salamander 

Smoking in bed . 

Spark from furnace 

Spark from Locomotive 

Spark on roof 

Spark from forge 

Spontaneous Combustion 

Tarvia truck on street . 

Thawing water pipes . 

Unknown 

Wood near stove . 

Wires on trees and poles 



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344 



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CHIEF ENGINEER FIRE DEPARTMENT. 345 

Manual Force. 

Robert Geaton, a callman, died August 3, 1919, appointed 
May 22, 1895, and one callman resigned. One permanent ma'i 
has been retired on a pension and one discharged. One per 
manent man was appointed. The membership of the depart- 
ment now consists of eighty-two permanent men and nine 
call men classified as follows, — 

1 Chief Engineer, 
1 First Assistant Engineer, 
1 Second Assistant Engineer, 
7 Captains, 
1 Master Mechanic, 
11 Lieutenants, 

3 Enginemen, 

57 Permanent men, 
9 Callmen. 

Apparatus. 

1 Second size, horse drawn steam fire engine, 

1 Third size, horse drawn steam fire engine, 

2 Horse drawn combination chemical engine and hose wagons. 
1 Horse drawn hose wagon, 

1 Horse drawn combination ladder truck and chemical engine, 
1 Horse drawn ladder truck, 
1 Motor driven ladder truck, 

4 Motor driven combination chemical engine and hose wagons. 
1 Second size tractor drawn steam fire engine, 

1 Motor driven 900 gallon pumping engine and hose wagon, 

1 Motor driven supply and wrecking car, 

1 Automobile, Chiefs car, 

1 Automobile, Assistant Chiefs car, 

1 Automobile for Master Mechanic. 

2 Assistant Chiefs buggies, 

1 Horse drawn relief hose wagon, 

1 Horse drawn relief ladder truck, 

4 Exercising wagons, 

1 Supply wagon. 

Horses. 

There are nineteen horses in the department, three have 
died and one was disposed in trade; two were purchased; tw^o 
ra,ore will liave to be bought to keep up the efficiency of the 
horse-drawn apparatus. Many of the horses are getting old 
and will have to be replaced much more rapidly than in the 
past. 

Hose. 

The amount of serviceable hose is 9,500 feet of two and 
one half inch rubber lined cotton hose, and 1,950 of three- 
quarter inch chemical hose. There has been tliree hundred feet 



340 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



of two and one-half inch hose purchased and five hundred feet 
condemned. There should be at least 12,000 feet of hose in 
the department but the cost has increased from twenty-five 
to thirty per cent, so that the amount is reduced to the very 
minimum. 

Brief Resume. 





$6,700 93 




15,981 00 




8,850 71 




2,322 00 




6,963 00 




5,659 00 




5,160 50 




2,473 96 




100 00 




15,509 46 




3,121 17 




4,348 74 




$77,190 47 



The average loss has been f6,500 a month, the months 
of Fel)ruary and October had upwards of |15,000 each ; the 
damage to St. Ann's Church in October amounted to §>14,000. 
The month of September had the smallest loss of any one month 
for tlie past twenty years i. e. |100. 

The following table gives the losses by months, — 
January- 
February 
March 
April 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 



There have been twenty fires with an insurance loss ex- 
ceeding |1,000 as follows, — 

January 22, 7 :43 A. M. Box 228, 550 Somerville Avenue, 
Middlesex Bleach, Bye and Print Works owned and occupied 
by K. M. Giimore Co., damage to building, |130.76, to contents 
f4,039.78. Cause, Spontaneous combustion. 

February 1, 2:10 A. M. Box 321, 138 Sycamore St., unoc- 
cupied dweJling owned by S. L. D. Millet, damage to building 
$2,885. Cause, incendiary. 

February 9, 9 :20 A. M.^ Box 47, 14-16 Dresden Circle, dwell- 
ing owned by George Buettel, occupants, George Dyment and 
Mrs. Emma Gould, damage to building |1,310, to contents |200. 
Cause, carelessness with matches. 

February 14, 2:42 A. M. Box 334, Middlesex Ave., Mystic 
River Ship Building Co., damage to building |1,000, to con- 
tents |2,000. Cause, probably tramps smoking. 

February 16, 9 :17 P. M. ^ Box 21, 45-47 South Street, Bak- 
ery and Macaroni Factory, owned and occupied by Michele 
Capodilupo, damage to building ^3,200, to contents |4,456. 
Cause, Electric wires. 

March 5, 6:21 P. M. Box 28, 550 Somerville Ave., Mid- 
dlesex Bleach, Dye and Print AYorks, owned and occupied bv 



CHIEF ENGINEER FIRE DEPARTMENT. 347 

K. M. Giluiore Co., damage to building |1,200, to contents 
$975.71. Cause, careless watchman, matches. 

March 8, 9 :02 P. M. Box 32, 17-19 Otis St., dwelling 
owned by Harry Schlager, occupants, Wm. H. Anlaw and A. 
Kichards, damage to building |1,700, to contents, |200. Cause, 
thawing water pipes. 

March 13, 8 :47 P. M. Box 232, 28 Lake St., Salt and Grain 
Storehouse, owned and occupied by Rosenthal and Choliin, dam- 
age to building |650, to contents, |1,850. Cause, spark from 
locomotive. 

March 14, 8:28 P. M. Box 119, 80 Pearl St., dwelling 
owned by Charles G. Johnson, occupants, Chas. G. Johnson 
and Mrs. Belle Hazen, damage to building |765, to contents, 
|400. Cause, unknown. 

April 3, 6 :05 P. M. Box 19, 197 Washington St., dwell- 
ing owned by the S. W. Holt Estate, occupant, W. E. Plumer, 
damage to building |774, to contents, |275. Cause, spark in 
newspapers. 

May 1, 9:15 A. M. Box 324, 66-68 Derby St., dwelling 
owned by Miss Sadie Thayer, occupants, Elbridge Tiltoii and 
William Highet, damage to building |2,040, dam-age to contents 
|100. Cause, overheated stove. 

May 10, 8 :54 P. M. Box 213, 31 Walnut St., Stable used 
as garage, owned by Mrs. Harriet Lamont, occupant Mrs. C. A. 
Musgrave, damage to building |1,000, to contents |1,600. Cause, 
upsetting lantern igniting gasoline. 

May 23, 1 :15 A. M. Box 114, a second alarm was sounded 
for this fire, rear Linwood Terrace, barrel storage owned and 
occupied by W. J. Carroll, damage to building |1,690, to con- 
tents .*|?1,410. Cause, unknown. 

June 5, 9 :33 P. M. Box 42, a second alarm was sounde<l 
for this fire, 1 Bleachery Court, rum storage owned by Daniel 
E. Chase Estate, damage to building |2,491, to contents |2,035. 
Cause, locomotive spark. 

July 7, 8 :03 A. M. Box 156, rear 22 No. Union St., Stable 
and shed owned and occupied by Dennis Lucey, damage to 
building f 1,285, to contents |640. Cause, careless smoker. 

August 2, 11:14 P. M. Box 219, 31-33 Houghton St., 
Bottling Plant owned by C. Varhely, occupied by Charles Birn- 
baum, damage to building |960, to contents |792.96. Cause, 
electric wires. 

October 18, 1 :39 A. M. Box 33, Cor. Medford and Thur- 
ston Sts., St. Ann's Church, damage to building, |10,000, to 
contents |3,700. Cause, carelessness with matches. 

October 28, 8:45 P. M. Box 331, 245 Pearl St., Grocery 
store in Fleming Building owned by F. W. Fleming, occupied 
by Carlo Bizzaro, damage to building 1756.66, to contents |300. 
Cause, incendiary. 



348 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

November 5, 8 :34 P. M. Box 217, 68 Summer St., Drug 
store and dwelling owned by Brady Estate, occupants C. H. 
Shea and Mrs. Margaret J. Pinkham, damage to building 
1870.17, to contents |800. Cause, Rubbish in cellar. 

December 15, 5 :57 A. M. Box 48, 8 Curtis St., owned and 
occupied by the Clarendon Club Association, damage to build- 
ing |2,210, to contents $400. Cause, spark from heater in cellar. 

Again the sounding of false alarms and alarms for bonfires 
lead all other causes. The penalty, if imposed upon the secur- 
ing of conviction, should be a sufficient deterrent and warning 
to others from practicing this foolish crime. Such an alarm, 
calling out the apparatus unnecessarily, caused an expense of 
over $800 in repairs to one motor piece. Every citizen and tax- 
payer, who has to bear this expense, should give to the author 
ities any and all information toward the apprehending anvi 
convicting this class of criminals. 

The number of fires caused by the careless use of matches 
and children playing with matches has again increased during 
the past year. Almost annually 1 have urged upon the citizens 
to exercise greater care in the handling of matches : as for 
children being permitted to have access to matches, there is 
no excuse. Parents use extraordinary care in keeping away 
from the child the unusual dangers, whereas the familiar match 
is left lying about; playing with which, the child, not infre- 
quently, is disfigured for life or burned to death. 



Recommendations. 

A full motorization of the department spells economy and 
efficiency; it is true that the purchase price of motor ap- 
paratus has advanced rapidl}^ in the past three years but thert^ 
appears no prospect of a reduction but rather a further ad- 
vance. The expense of maintaining the horses, feeding and 
shoeing, has become almost prohibitive, it having advanced 
practically 50% to 75%. Furthermore, the National Board 
of Fire Underwriters are adopting a new method of classifica- 
tion and rating of cities and communities, — heretofore cities 
have been rated according to their efficiency and thereby classi- 
fied as A. B. C. D., etc., and the insurance assessed accordingly, 
whereas under the new plan, marked according to their deficien- 
cies, they will be numbered from 1 to 10, and in order that a city 
may be placed in one of the first three classes, the deficiency 
mark, as applied to the fire department, requires, at least, three- 
fourths of the department shall be motorized. At the present 
time eleven of the nineteen pieces of apparatus are motorized 
in our city. 



CHIEF ENGINEER FIRE DEPARTMENT. 349 

In Conclusion. 

In closing I wish to express to His Honor, the Mayor, and 
the gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen, my sincere apprecia- 
tion and thanks for the unfailing cordiality, consideration 
and courtesy shown me the past year. 

To my associates in the department I express my gratitude 
for their loyal support and the efficient manner in which they 
liave performed their various duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sewall M. Rich^ 

Chief Engineer. 



350 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE. 



January 31, 1920. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville: — 

Gentlemen ; — 1 respectfully submit the annual report of 
the Somerville police department for the year ending December 
31,1919,— 



Arrests 



Whole number of arrests raade 
With and without warrants 
On summons and notification 



1,184 

580 



1,764 



Males 
Females 



1,674 
90 



1,764 



Americans 
Foreign Born 



1,246 

518 



1,764 



Residents 
Non-residents 



1,089 
675 



1,764 



1,764 



1. — Crimes and Offenses Against the Person. 



Assaults . * . . . 








2 


Assault on officer . 






1 


Assault and battery on officers 






8 


Assault with dangerous weapon 






6 


Assault with intent to murder . 






2 


Assault with intent to rape 








1 


Assault and battery 








95 


Carnal abuse of female child . 








1 


Manslaughter . 








4 


Murder .... 








2 


Murder, witness to . 








1 


Rape .... 








5 


Robbery .... 








5 


Robbery, attempt 








2 


Threats .... 








4 



139 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 



351 



2. — Crimes and Offenses Against Property. 



Breaking and entering .... 

Breaking and entering, attempt 

Breaking and entering railroad cars 

Breaking and entering railroad cars, attempt 

Breaking glass ... 

Concealment of leased property 

Destroying electric lamp . 

Injury to real estate . 

Larceny .... 

^Larceny, attempt 

Larceny from person 

Larceny in building . 

Malicious mischief . 

Receiving stolen goods 

Trespass .... 

Trespass, wilful 

Unlawfully taking horse . 

Unlawfully using electricity 



83 
6 
7 
3 

10 
2 
1 
6 

151 
1 
6 
5 
2 
5 

115 

12 

2 

1 



41S 



Crimes and Offenses Against Public Order, Etc. 



Adultery ...... 

Bail surrender ..... 

Bastardy . . . 

Ca/pias ...... 

Carrying concealed weapons 
Carrying firearms without licence . 
Contempt of court .... 

Cruelty to animals .... 

Dangerous weapons, in possession of 

Default 

Deserters from United States Army . 
Deserter from United States Navy . 
Desertion of wife .... 

Disorderly conduct on public conveyance 
Disturbing the peace 
Disturbing public assembly 
Dog keeping, unlicensed . 
Drunkenness ..... 

Drunkenness, common 
Escape from Industrial School 
False scales, in possession of . 
Gaming implements, present when found 
Gaming nuisance .... 

Giving false alarm of fire . 

Incest ...... 

Indecent exposure of person . 
Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 
Neglected children .... 

Neglect to support .... 

(Revoke of parole, Lyman School 

Revoke of parole, State Farm, Bridgewater 

Safe keeping, alcoholism 

Safe keeping, demented . 

Safe keeping, escaped prisoner 



4 

6 
6 
5 
1 
4 
5 
6 
1 

12 
2 
1 
2 
5 
8 

17 
3 
326 
5 
1 
2 

22 
3 
4 
1 
2 

12 

16 

80 
3 
2 
1 

30 
1 



352 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Safe keeping, escape from Industrial School . 
Safe keeping, escape from Middlesex Training 

School . . . 

Safe keeping, feeble minded 
Safe keeping, insane 
Safe keeping, escape from Prison Camp, Tewks 

bury 
Safe keeping, revoke of parole, Lyman School 

for Boys . 
Safe keeping, revoke of parole from Industrial 

School 
Safe keeping, revoke of parole, from Mass. Re: 

formatory 

Safe keeping, runaway from Industrial School 
Safe keeping, runaway from Lyman School 
Safe keeping, runaway children 
Selling gasoline, short measure 
Selling ice, short weight . 
Stubbornness ..... 
Unnatural act ..... 
Straggler from United States Army 
Straggler from United States Navy 
Suspicious persons . 
Violation of city ordinances 
Violation of cigarette law 
Violation of insurance law 
Violation of labor laws 
Violation of liquor laws 
Violation of Lord's Day 
Violation of milk laws 
Violation of parole . 

Violation of parole from Mass. Reformatory 
Violation of motor vehicle laws 
Violation of parole from State Farm 
Violation of school laws . 
Violation of terms of probation 
Violation of traffic rules . 
Walking on railroad track 



3 
1 
2 

21 
1 
2 

19 
1 
1 
1 
2 
125 
1 
1 

29 
5 

59 

10 

1 

1 

246 

1 

16 

28 
1 

14 



Recapitulation. 



(1) Crimes and Offenses Against the Person 

(2) Crimes and Offenses Against Property . 

(3) Crimes and Offenses Against Public Or 
der, etc. ....... 

Total numiber of arrests made . 

Bailed to appear at other courts . 

Cases in which nolle prosequi was entered . 

Contempt of court ...... 

Defaulted 

Delivered to jail at East Cambridge, bail sur- 
render ....... 

Delivered to police court, violation of proba- 
tion, etc. ......*. 



139 

418 

1,207 



10 

33 

5 

1 



30 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 353 

Delivered to superior court, bail surrender, 

capias, etc. ...... 4 

Discontinued and dismissed in police court -. 6 

Released by probation officer, drunkenness, etc. 37 

Surrendered to other officers, institutions, etc. 161 

Witness to murder ...... 1 



293 
Number of cases held for trial .... 1,471 

Note, — Four hundred and seventy-five of the above number of 
cases were juveniles and delinquents. 



354 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Miscellaneous Reports. 



Abandoned automobiles ..... 


2G 


Abandoned motorcycle 


1 


Accidents reported ...... 


555 


Alarms given for fire ...... 




Amount of property stolen .... 


$46,001 71 


Amount of stolen property recovered 


62.443 61 


Amount of property lost ..... 


. • 1,145 25 


Amount of lost property found .... 


88 63 


Assaults . . 


10 


Assault, attempt ... 


1 


Assault and battery ...... 


2 


Assault with dangerous weapon 




Assault, indecent 


X 


Attempts to break and enter .... 


44 


Attempts to commit larceny .... 


7 


Attempts toi commit suicide .... 


4 


Attempts to rob . . . 


3 


Buildings broken and entered, nothing stolen . 


55 


Buildings found open ..... 


342 


Carrier pigeon found . . . . 


1 


Cats killed 




2 


Cellar flooded . 




1 


Cruelty to animals . 




2 


Dead animals found 




4 


Dead body found 




1 


Defective bridges 




5 


buildings 




2 


" catch basins ..... 


29 


" drinking fountains .... 


3 


" driveway ...... 


1 


" electric lamps ..... 


6 


" fences ...... 


•i 


" fire alarm box ..... 


1 


" fire escape ..... 


1 


" gas gate boxes . . . . . 


2 


guy rope ' . 


1 


" hydrants ...... 


8 


" man holes and covers 


3 


poles ...... 


2 


" police signal service . 


18 


" sewer ....... 


1 


" sidewalks ...... 


325 


" sidewalks, lighted .... 


9 


" signs and sign posts . . ... 


86 


" streets ...... 


128 


street, lighted 


1 


^ tree guard . . . 


1 


" U. S. mail box . . . . . 


1 


*' waste barrel ...... 


1 


" water gate boxes . . . . , 


41 


" wires . . 


51 


Demented persons ...... 


4 


Disturbances . ...... 


27 


Disturbances suppressed 


4 


Dogs killed . 


8 


Dog, mad 


1 


Dog, vicious 


1 


Elopement 




1 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 



355 



False alarm for burglary 

Fire, alarms given for 

Fires extinguished without alarm 

Fire, needless alarms for . 

Fires, false alarms of . 

Fires reported . 

Gaming .... 

Gas leaks .... 

Gas poisoning , 

Heat prostration 

Horse killed 

House boat broken and entered 

Houses unoccupied . 

Indecent exposure of person 

Insane cases 

Larcenies, no value given . 

Larcenies . . ... 

Lost children 

Lost children, found . 

Malicious mischief . 

Missing persons 

Missing persons, found 

Neglected children . 

Obstructions on railroad itrack 
on sidewalks 
in streets 
" in streets, not lighted 

" in streets, lighted 

Panes of glass broken 

Permits granted to labor on Lord's 

Permits granted to carry firearms 

Person helped home . 

Persons bitten by dogs 

Property damaged and destroyed 

Property lost, no value given 

Property found, no value given 

Rescued person from fire . 

Robberies .... 

Runaway children 

Runaway children, found . 

Runaway horse . 

Runaway horses, stopped . 

Runaway teams, stopped . 

Sidewalks dangerous from snow and 

Sidewalks flooded . 

Still born infant, found 

Stray bullets, fired 

Stray cat^ 

Stray cows, found 

Stray dogs 

Stray dogs, found 

Stray donkey 

Stray donkey, found 

Stray horse 

Stray horses, found 

Stray parrot, found 

Stray pig . 

Stray pig, found 

Stray teams 

Stray teams, found 



Day 



ice 



3 
3 
2 
3 

39 

205 

1 

9 

1 

1 

1 

1 

36 

6 

3 

126 

492 

269 

269 

40 

72 

36 

1 



t^ 

13 

21 

5 

5 

277 

91 

467 

1 

9 

62 

56 

53 

1 

6 

28 

31 

1 

3 

3 

3 

1 

1 

3 

2 

2 

88 
51 
1 
1 
1 
8 
1 
1 
1 

12 
17 



356 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Streets dangerous, from snow and ice 
Street lights, reported . » . . 
Strikes ....... 

Sudden deaths ...... 

Suicide ....... 

Subways, flooded ..... 

Summonses served for witnesses and defendents to 

appear in court at other places . 
Suspicious persons ..... 

Team hired and not returned in proper time 
Threats ....... 

Trees, dangerous ..... 

Trespass ....... 

Trespass, wilful ..... 

Unlawful appropriation of horses 

Unlawful appropriation of motor vehicles 

Violation of accosting act 

Violation of board of health rules . 

Violation of city ordinances 

Violation of Lord's Day .... 

Violation of motor vehicle laws 

Water pipes, leaking ..... 

Wife desertion ...... 

Windows broken ..... 



6 
3,509 
2 
5 
1 
2 

354 

82 

1 

2 

50 

33 

18 

2 

5 

1 

3 

125 

o 
O 

3 

124 

1 

58 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 



357 



OFFICIAL ROSTER OF DEPARTMENT. 

Chief of Police. 
Charles A. Kendall. 

Captain. 

Eugene A. Carter. 



Charles E.l Woodman 



Thomas Damery 



William G. Kenney 
Frank H. Graves 
James M. Lynch 



Lieutenants. 

John A. Ray. 
Inspectors. 

Sergeants. 



Patrolmen. 



1 — Edward M. Carter 

2 — George L. Smith 

3 — Francis A. Perkins 

4 — Theodore E. Heron 

5 — Charles W. Stevens 

6 — Daniel G. Simons 

7 — Samuel Burns 

8 — Jotham Chisholm 

9 — John A. Dadmun 

10 — George L. Rice 

11 — Myron S. Gott 

12 — Charles W. Reick 

13 — Frank C. Hopkins 

14 — Charles W. Allen 

15 — Hudson M. Howe 

16 — Sanford S. Lewis 

17 — Henry A. Sudbey 

18 — Thomas F. McNamara 

19 — Louis F. Arnold 

20 — Charles S. Johnston 

21 — Claude L. Grossman 

22 — John J. Cummings 

23 — Edmund J. Keane 

24 — Denis Neylon 

25 — Denis Downey 

26 — Edward M. Davies 

27 — George A. C. Peters 

28 — Louis J. Belzarini 

29 — Walter Reed 

30 — Dennis G. Mulqueeney 

31 — Patrick J. Doolin 

32 — Edward J. Hopkins 

33 — Walter L. Groves 

34 — Frederick G. Jones 

35 — Joseph A. Dwyer 

36 — Augustine J. Fitzpatrick 

37 — Patrick McGrath 



James M. Harmon 



Michael T. Kennedy 



Ernest Howard 
Robert T. Blair 
Thomas P. Walsh 



38 — Bernard McCabe 

39 — Harry C. Young 

40 — Robert D. Dewar 

41 — Peter 'Moore 

42 — Albert C. Hawes 

43 — Walter C. Oesting 

44 — John L. Cameron 

45 — Francis P. Higgins 

46 — John J. McCahey 

47 — Alexander Morrison 

48 — Daniel J. Powers 

49 — Jeremiah O'Connor 

50 — Charles E. Wilson 

51 — William J. Warner 

52 — Timothy Buckley 

53 — John J. Killourhy 

54 — Charles J. Sharry 

55 — Thomas M. Sharry 

56 — Michael J. O'Loughlin 

57 — Charleis W. Shepherd 

58 — John F. Cruise 

59 — John J. Shay 

60 — Edward G. Butman 

61 — John P. L. O'Keefe 
62— Alfred E. Robitaille 

63 — Allan S. Burns 

64 — William H. Donovan 

65 — George R. Allan 

66 — Jeremiah Keniry 

67 — James Murray 

68 — Charles J. Fulton 

69 — Edward F. Culliton 

70 — Alfred J. McFadden 

71 — James A. Fitzpatrick 

72 — Elmer E, G. Raymond 

73 — Frank J. Roche 

74 ^ Augustine F. Sharry 



358 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Reservemen. 



75 — Daniel M. O'Connell 

76 — Chester C. F. Warner 

77 — George D. MacDonald 



78 — Charles F. Lacey 

79 — William E. Dwyer 

80 — Charles H. McAvoy 



Chauffeurs and Patrol Drivers. 

James W. Lundergan James H. White 

John H. McKenzie. 



Matron. 
Mrs. Mina T. Weeks. 

Assistant Matron. 
Mrs. Katherine Woods. 



John E. Fuller, 

Ira S. Carleton, May 9, 1907 

James J. Pollard Feb. 27, 1908 

MelvilleC.Parkhurst,Oct. 31, 190S 

Herbert Hilton, Dec. 21, 1911 

Ezra A. Dodge, Mar. 14, 1914 



Pensioners, Retired On Half Pay. 
Mar. 23, 1906 George H. Carleton, Mar. 



Frederick H. Googins, Mar. 
Robert R. Perry, Apr. 
Jacob W. Skinner, Dec. 
Elmer E. Drew, July 

Ernest S. Goff, July 



27, 1914 
12, 1915 
14, 1916 
31, 1917 
25, 1918 
11, 1919 



CHANGES IN FORCE. 



Appointments. 



Charles F. Lacey, appointed, reserveman. May 26, 1919. 
William E. Dwyer, appointed, reserveman, May 26, 1919. 
Charles H. McAvoy, appointed, reserveman, May 26, 1919. 



Promotions. 

Reserveman, Alfred J. McFadden, promoted to patrolman, May 24, 
1919. 

Reserveman, James A. Fitzpatrick, promoted to patrolman. May 24, 
1919. 

Reserveman, Elmer E. G. Raymond, promoted to patrolman, Sept. 
13, 1919. 

Reserveman, Frank J. Roche, promoted to patrolman, Sept. 27, 
1919. 

Reserveman, Augustine F. Sharry, promoted to patrolman, Nov. 15, 
1919. 

Patrolman, Robert T. Blair, promoted to sergeant, Dec. 20, 1919. 

Patrolman, Thomas P. Walsh, promoted to sergeant, Dec. 20, 1919. 



Resignations. 

Patrolman, Arthur S. Walsh, resigned, Jan. 9, 1919. 
Patrolman, Clyde W. Steeves, resigned, Got. 8, 1919. 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 



359 



1919 



Retirements. 
Patrolman, William J. Davidson, placed on pension roll, Jan. 24, 

Patrolman, Ernest S. Goff, placed on pension roll, July 11, 1919. 



Death. 
Retired patrolman, William J. Davidson, died Sept. 1, 1919. 



Police Signal Service. 

Number of on duty calls made by the patrolmen 
Telephone calls made by the officers and patrolmen 



245,344 
41,328 



"White" Combination Automobile Service. 

Number of runs made in conveying prisoners to station 

Number of prisoners conveyed ..... 

Number of sick and injured conveyed .... 

Numiber of miles run in conveying prisoners 

to station 914.0 

Number of miles run in conveying sick and in- 
jured ....... 952.1 

Number of miles run in conveying prisoners 

to and from jail ...... 582.4 

Number of miles run elsewhere . . . 835.4 



Total number of miles run during the year 



434 
556 
312 



3,283.9 



"Reo" Combination Automobile Service. 

Number of runs made in conveying prisoners to station . 

Number of prisoners conveyed ..... 

Number of sick and injured conveyed .... 

Number of miles run in conveying prisoners to 

station ....... 137.1 

Number of miles run in conveying sick and in- 
jured 129.7 

Number of miles run in conveying prisoners to 

and from jail ...... 95.5 

Number of miles run elsewhere . . . . 260.5 



62 
76 
33 



Total number of miles run during the year 



622.8 



Touring Car Reports. 

Number of prisoners conveyed to station ... 40 

Number of sick and injured conveyed .... 3 

Horse Drawn Patrol Wagon and Horse Drawn Ambulance Reports. 

Number of runs made in conveying prisoners to station 4 

Number of prisoners conveyed ..... 4 

Number of miles run in conveying prisoners to station 5 

Number of sick and injured conveyed . . . . 279 

Number of miscellaneous runs ..... 10 



P)00 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF POLICE MATRON. 

January 31, 1920. 

To Charles A. Kendall, Chief of Police. 
Dear Sir : — 

I herewith submit my report as matron for the year ending 
December 31, 1919. The following females and minors having 
been committed to my care for following offenses, etc. 



Adultery 






2 


Assault and battery . , . 






8 


Contempt of court .... 






1 


Default 








Demented ..... 






4 


Drunkenness ..... 






15 


Larceny ...... 






8 


Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 






5 


Lost children ..... 






72 


Neglected children .... 






7 


Operating automobile without license 






1 


Runaways 






2 


Safe keeping ..... 






6 


School absentee .... 






1 


Stubbornness ..... 






S 


Threats ...... 






1 


Trespass ...... 






10 


Violation, city ordinance . 






1 


Violation of parole .... 






1 


Violation of probation 






1 



Total 



156 



I have reported at police station each morning and at- 
tended juvenile sessions of court looking after all minors who 
have been in court. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Mina T. Weeks, 

Matron. 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 361 

Conclusion. 

The following officers returned from duty in the United 
States service during the year, — John L. Cameron, Charles 
J. Sharry, Allan S. Burns, Wiliam H. Donovan, Alfred J. Mc- 
Fadden, James A. Fitzpatrick, Elmer E. G. Raymond, Frank 
J. Roche and Augustine F. Sharry. There were two strikes 
during the year, one of employees of the New England Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Co., and another at the packing house 
plants, which took place on October 16th and lasted until 'De- 
cember 15, 1919, of about 3000 employees of the North Pack- 
ing and Provision Co., John P. Squire & Co., New England 
Dressed Meat and Wool Co., Sturtevant & Haley Beef Co., and 
Carl Weitz Sausage Co. All vacations, days off and leave 
of absence for the officers were suspended during this latter 
strike and conditions were handled by this department 
in a very satisfactory manner. Every officer in the depart- 
ment performed many extra hours of duty and every available 
officer was placed on duty around the plants, covering the 
twenty-four hours each day, and no loss of life and not a 
dollars worth of destruction of property occurred. 

To His Honor the Mayor, Charles W. Eldridge for his uni- 
form courtesy and advice on all matters pertaining to this 
department, members of the board of aldermen, court officials, 
newspaper correspondents, and to all members of this depart- 
ment for attention to their duties, I wish to extend my sincere 
thanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles A. Kendall^ 

Chief of Police. 



362 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



Office of Sealer of Weights and Measures^ 
City Hall Annex, Somerville, January 1, 1920. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

The following report of the sealer of weights and measures 
for the year 1919 is respectfully submitted : — 

Chapter 62 of Kevised Laws : — 

Section 21. Sealers of weights and measures shall an- 
nually give public notice by advertisement, or by posting, in 
one or more public places in their respective cities and towns, 
notices to all inhabitants or persons having usual places ol 
business therein who use weights, measures or balances for the 
purpose of selling goods, wares, merchandise or other com- 
modities or for public weighing, to bring in their weights, 
measures and balances to be adjusted and sealed. Such sealers 
shall attend in one or more convenient places, and shall ad- 
just, seal and record all weights, measures and balances so 
brought in. 

Section 23. Said sealers shall go once a year, and oftener 
if necessar3^ to every hay and coal scale and to every platform 
balance within their respective cities and towns which cannot 
be easily or conveniently removed, and shall test the accuracy 
of, adjust and seal the same. 

Section 34. Sealers of weights and measures shall receive 
fees as follows : — For sealing (a) all scales with a capacity of 
more than five thousand pounds, one dollar each ; (b) all scales 
with a weighing capacity of one hundred to five thousand 
pounds, fifty cents each; (c) all other scales, balances, and 
measures on pumps, ten cents each, and (d) all weights and 
other measures, three cents each. They shall also receive 
reasonable compensation for all necessary repairs, alterations 
and adjustments made by them. 

When weights and measures are sealed as provided in Sec- 
tion 21 (that is, brought to the office) no fees are charged for 
sealing. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



363 



In compliance with the foregoing Section 21, the custom- 
ary notice was given by advertising in the Somerville papers in 
March, 1919. 

During the year all places where goods were bought or sold 
were visited and all scales, weights and measures were tested, 
and all found correct were sealed and all found not correct were 
condemned. 

ANNUAL REPORT. 



Work of Weights and Measures Department for 1919. 



Number of 


scales sealed .... 


2,044 




Number of 


weights sealed .... 


3,851 




Number of 


dry measures sealed . 


73 




Number of liquid measures sealed 


5,715 




Number of 


oil and gas pumps sealed 


260 




Number of 


yard sticks sealed 


132 




Number of 


miscellaneous sealed, . 


4 




Total 




12,079 


Number of 


scales adjusted 


34 




Number of 


weights adjusted .... 


37 




Total 




71 


Number of 


scales condemned 


77 




Num'ber of 


weights condemned 


23 




Number of 


dry measures condemned 


7 




Number of 


liquid measures condemned . 


124 




Number of 


yard sticks condemned 







Number of 


Gas pumps condemned 


2 




Total 




233 


Number of 


scales and weights out of use non- 






sealed 





41 


41 


Number of 


inspections in stores and street . 


289 


289 



Total tests made in 1919 . 



12,713 



JOHN^ H. DUSSEAULT^ 

Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



864 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF THE LAW DEPARTMENT. 



To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen oi' 
the City of Somervllle: 

The annual report of the law department for the year 
ending December 31, 1919, is as follows: 

The boundary line between Somerville and Medford at 
present runs through many dwelling houses in such a manner 
that it is difficult to determine in which city the occupants 
live. Question has been raised as to the right of children liv- 
ing in such houses to attend public schools in this city. With 
the approval of Mayor Eldridge, I drew a petition signed by 
the mayors of the two cities for a change in the boundary line 
and attended to its publication in the manner required by law 
and by the rules of the general court in order that legislation 
may be obtained in the year i920, if a new boundary line can 
be agreed upon. 

An act was secured from the legislature, chapter 41 of the 
general acts entitled ''An act relative to collectors of taxes," 
which it is hoped will cause a material reduction of annual 
premiums paid the surety company on bonds of the city treas- 
urer and collector of taxes. 

I represented the city at hearings held by the trustees of 
the Boston Elevated Railway Company relative to the appor- 
tionment on various cities and towns of a deficit in the income 
of the company. The portion assigned to Somerville was ap- 
proximately the same as if on the basis of population. 

I represented the city also at hearings held for the United 
States director of railroads in regard to increasing railroad 
fares in Somerville and elsewhere. Opposition was presented 
in behalf of many localities in the metropolitan district and no 
increase was made affecting this city. 

At the request of the inspector of milk, I acted for the 
prosecution in the Somerville Police Court of persons charged 
with violation of the milk laws. Claims against the city w^ere 
settled for sums varying from |20 to |750. A non-suit was ob- 
tained in one action and costs were collected by the city from 
the plaintiff. Another action which the city refused to settle 
was abandoned. A demurrer filed in behalf of the city in a case 
in equity relating to a garage license was sustained by tlie 
court. 

Very respectfully, 

Frank W. Kaan, 

City Solicitor, 



CITY CLERK. 365 



J^EPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



Office of the City Clerk, 
January 1, 1920. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen : — The following is respectfully submitted as 
the forty-eighth annual report of the City Clerk of the City of 
Somerville, and is for the year ending December 31, 1919. 

The receipts and payments were as follows : — 



Receipts. 

Balance from year 1918, being for dog li- 
censes issued in December, 1918: — 
6 males at $2.00 .... $12 00 

1 spayed at $2.00 .... 2 00 



$14 00 



Less city clerk's fees paid to the city 

treasurer, 7 at $ .20 . . . 1 40 



For dog licenses issued in 1919: — 

750 males at $2.00 .... $1,500 00 

169 females at $5.00 .... 845 00 

90 spayed at $2.00 .... 180 00 

1 kennel at $25.00 .... 25 00 



For hunting and fishing licenses issued 
in 1919: — 
295 resident hunters at $1.00 . . $295 00 

1 foreign born unnaturalized hunter 

at $15.00 15 00 

21 resident fishermen at $ .50 . . 10 50 



Recording mortgages, assignments, etc., 

823 papers $461 80 

Certificates of marriage intentions, — 

1226 licenses and 2 duplicates at $1.00 . 1,228 00 

Furnishing copies of records . . . 261 60 

Licenses: — 

Auctioneers, 25 licenses 

at $2.00 ... $50 00 

1 license granted in 

1918 .... 2 00 

52 00 



$12 60 



$2,550 00 



$320 50 



366 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Billiard and pool tables 

and bowling alleys: — 

34 licenses for 100 ta- 
bles and 94 alleys at 
$2.00 . . . $388 00 

1 license for 6 tables 

granted in 1918 . 12 00 



$400 00 

Drain layers, 4 licenses at $1.00 . . 4 00 

Engines and motors, — 

25 licenses for 31 motors and 4 sta- 
tionary engines at $1.00 ... 25 00 

Garages, — 

286 licenses, including 1 paid in 1918, 

at $2.00 570 00 

1 license granted in 1917 and 4 in 

1918, 5 at $2.00 . 10 00 580 00 

Gasoline tanks, — 26 li- 
censes at $1.00 . $26 00 

2 licenses granted in 

1918 ... 2 00 



Hackney carriages, — 4 licenses at $1.00 
Innholders and common victuallers, — 
51 licenses for 49 victuallers and 2 
innholders at $2.00 
Intelligence offices, — 2 licenses at $2.00 

Junk and second band licenses, — 



23 licenses at $25.00 . 


$575 00 


3 licenses granted in 




1918 


75 00 


32 licenses at $10.00 . 


320 00 


3 licenses granted in 




1918 


30 00 



Lord's day, sale of ice cream, confec- 
tionery, soda water and fruit, on, — 
107 licenses at $5.00 

Private detectives, — 3 licenses at $10.00 
iSecond hand motor vehicles, — 

42 licenses at $10.00 .... 
Slaughtering, — 7 licenses at $1.00 
Street musicians, — 5 licenses for 5 

persons at $ .50 
To play gasoline power organ in 

streets, — 1 at $1.00 .... 
Wagons, — 49 licenses for 73 wagons at 

$1.00 

Wagon stands, — 4 licenses at $1.00 

Permits for projections over sidewalks, — 
24 permits for 1 mar- 
quee, 16 signs and 7 



28 


00 


4 


00 


102 
4 


00 
00 



1,000 00 



535 


00 


30 


00 


420 


00 


7 


00 


2 


50 


1 


00 


73 


00 


4 


00 



CITY CLERK. 



367 



awnings at $1.00 . $24 00 

5 permits for signs 

granted in 1918 . 5 00 

Filing certificates, under Acts of 1908, 

Chap. 502,-2 at $ .50 . 
Interest on deposits 
Notices of hearings (public service cor 

porations) .... 
Chiropodists' registration, — 3 at $ .50 
Physicians' registration, — 5 at $ .25 . 
Repairing and sale of junk badges . 
Witness fees ..... 



Total receipts 



$29 00 

1 00 
11 73 

7 10 
1 50 

1 25 
3 30 

2 85 



$5,280 63 
$8,163 73 



Payments. 



To Joseph O. Hayden, county treasurer, 

June 1 and December 1, receipts for dog 

licenses from December 1, 1918 to 

November 30, 1919, both inclusive; 

751 males at $2.00 

168 females at $5.00 . 

90 spayed at $2.00 . 

1 kennel at $25.00 . 



Less city clerk's fees, 1010 at $ .20 . 



$1,502 00 




840 00 




180 00 




25 00 




$2,547 00 




202 00 






$2,345 00 



To the Commissioners on Fisheries and 
Grame, for licenses for hunting and fish- 
ing in 1919,— 
295 resident hunters at $1.00 

1 unnaturalized foreign born at 

$15.00 

21 resident fishermen at $ .50 . 



Less city clerk's fees, Oct. 10 to Dec. 
31, 1919, inclusive, — 151 at $ .15 



$295 00 



15 


00 


10 


50 


$320 


50 


22 


65 



297 85 



To the city treasurer, monthly: — 

City clerk's fees for issuing and re- 
cording dog licenses, 1010 at $ .20 
City clerk's fees for issuing and re- 
cording fishing and hunting li- 
censes, 151 at $ .15 
All the receipts above specified, ex- 
cept for dog licenses and fishing 
and hunting licenses 



Total payments 



202 00 




22 65 




5,280 63 


5,505 28 • 






$8,148 13 



368 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Balance, January 1, 1920, being for dog li- 
censes issued in December, 1919: — 
5 males at $2.00 . $10 00 

1 female at $5.00 . 5 00 

1 spayed at $2.00 . 2 00 



Less city clerk'.s fees paid to the city 
treasurer, 7 at $ .20 . 



$17 00 
1 40 



$15.60 



Licenses and Permits. 



Besides the licenses mentioned in the foregoing list of 
receipts, licenses and permits have been granted by the Board 
of Aldermen, without charge, as follows : — 



Auctioneers, (to veterans of the Civil War) - . 
Children under fifteen to take part in entertainments 
Newsboys ........ 

To keep lodging houses, under Chap. 259, Acts of 1918 
To hold open air meetings ..... 

To parade in streets, with music, etc. . 

To hold religious services in streets and squares . 

To sing Christmas carols in streets .... 

To suspend banner across square .... 

To give band concerts (two permits for seven concerts) 
To move buildings through streets .... 



12 

44 

2 

3 

4 
1 
1 

2 
2 



Births. 
1919. 



Number of births reported by physicians and midwives for 



1919. 



Males . 
Females 



920 
917 



A canvass of the city is at present being made under the 
direction of the city clerk as required by section 5, chapter 29, 
of the Revised Laws, to ascertain the facts required for record 
relative to children born during the year. 

As the information derived from such canvass will not 
be available in time sufficient for its incarporation in this re- 
port, a statement in full of the births of 1919 will be given in the 
city clerk's report for the year 1920. 

1918. 
The following is a statement in full of the births of 191 S. 



Number of births (exclusive of still births) in Somerville 

in 1918 registered . . . . 

Less than previous year ....... 

Males 991 

Females 990 



1,981 
56 



1,981 



CITY CLERK. 



3G9 



Born of American parents ..... 

Born of foreign parents ..... 

Born of American father and foreign mother . 
Born of foreign father and American mother 
Born of American mother and father of unknown 
nationality ....... 

Born of foreign mother and father of unknown 
nationality ...... 

Number of still-births in Somerville in 1918 as 
registered ...... 

Number of births in other places in 1918 registered 



Number of cases of twins 



820 
772 
172 
204 

11 



1,981 

74 
617 

2,672 
25 



Marriages. 

Number of intention certificates issued in 1919 

More than previous year 

Marriages registered . 

More than previous year 

Both parties American 

Both parties foreign 

American groom and foreign bride 

Foreign groom and American bride 

First marriage of . . . 

Second marriage, of 

Third marriage- of . . . 



779 
192 
129 
127 



2,161 

272 
21 



1,226 
279 

1,227 
253 



1,227 couples 



1,227 couples 



Deaths. 

(Exclusive of still-births.) 
Number of deaths in Somerville in 1919 
Less than previous year 
Males ...... 

Females ...... 



Under ten years 
10 and under 20 
20 and under 30 
30 and under 40 
40 and under 50 
50 and under 60 
60 and under 70 
70 and under 80 
80 and under 90 
90 years of age 



of age 

years of age 
years of age 
years of age 
years of age 
years of age 
years of age 
years of age 
years of age 
and over . 



Age of oldest person deceased 
Born in iSomerville .... 
Born in other places in the United States 
Of foreign birth .... 

Birthplace unknown .... 



98 years 



502 

572 



186 

35 

72 

71 

83 

122 

187 

206 

99 

13 



189 

519 

363 

3 



1,074 
459 



1,074 



1,074 



1,074 



37U 


ANNUAL 


. REPORTS 


. 




Number of deaths 


in January .... 166 


Number of deaths 


in February 








125 


Number of deaths 


in March 








108 


Number of deaths 


in April . 








84 


Number of deiaths 


in May . 








90 


Number of deaths 


in June . 








73 


Number of deaths 


in July . 








63 


Number of deaths 


in August 








61 


Number of deaths 


in September 








55 


Number of deaths 


in October 








71 


Number of deaths 


in November 








85 


Number of deaths 


in December 








93 



1,074 



The number of still-births during the j^ear was fifty-four. 
In addition to the above 254 deaths which occurred elsewhere 
were recorded in Somerville, almost the entire number of per- 
sons deceased having been residents of this city. 



CITY CLERK. 



371 



ASSESSED POLLS AND REGISTERED VOTERS. 
Men's Lists. 





^ARD 


Precinct. 


As- 
sessed 
Polls. 
April 

1, 
1919 


Registered Voters. 


w 


Nov. 
20, 
1918 


Re- 
vised 
Lists ; 

of 
July 

15, 
1919 


Add- 
ed in 
Sept. 
& 

Oct. 
1919 


Oct. 

15, 
1919 


Add- 
ed in 
Nov. 
1919 


Dec. 

3. 
1919 


Voted 
Nov. 

4. 
1919 


Voted 

Dec. 

23, 

1919 


Ward 


1 


Precinct 1 

2 

3 

4 

Precinct 1 

2 

3 

Precinct 1 

2........ 

Precinct 1 

2 

Precinct 1 

2 

3 

Precinct 1 

2 

3 

Precinct 1 

2 

3 

4 

5 


1,449 

1.044 

519 

663 


673 
448 
250 
223 


5991 107 
3971 78 
231 ! 32 


706 
475 
263 
216 


44 

77 
16 

8 


750 
552 
279 
224 


583 
394 
203 
191 


430 




1 


325 


" 


1. 


159 


•• 


1.. 


191 


25 


172 




2 




Ward 


3,675 

1,032 

1,784 

742 


1,594 

388 
759 
851 


1.418 
342 


242 
30 


1,660 
372 


145 

12 


1,805 

384 
806 
377 


1,371 

292 
621 

278 


1,086 
243 




2 


682 107 
321 49 


789 17 


328 


" 


2 


370 


7 


170 




3 


_ 


Ward 


3.558 

1,389 
1,242 


1,498 

799 
711 


1.345! 186 

775! 118 
652! 86 


1,531 

893 
738 


36 

14 
11 


1,567 

907 

749 


1,191 

743 
624 


741 

248 


3 


249 




4 




Ward 


2,63i 

1,404 
1,349 


1,510 

658 
609 


1.427 
623 


204 
119 


1,631 25 
742 36 


1.656 

778 
712 


1,367 

618 
561 


497 
217 




4 


539 128 


667 


45 


179 




5 




Ward 


2,753 

1.420 
1.112 
1,007 


1,267 

755 
639 
551 


1.1621 247 

687 109 
5941 70 
499 94 


1,409 

796 
664 
593 


81 

22 

24 

7 


1.490 

818 
688 
600 


1,179 

686 
550 

485 


396 

227 




5 


221 


•' 


5 


198 




6 




Ward 


3,539 

1.966 
1.516 
1,280 


1,945 

890 
775 
748 


1.780 

833 
694 

687 


273 

154 
112 

98 


2,053 

987 
806 

785 


53 

18 
14 
20 


2,106 

1005 
820 
805 


1,721 

807 
680 
671 


646 
416 




6 


309 


«• 


6 


305 




7 




Ward 


4,762 

1.095 
1.294 
1,522 

1,088 
827 


2,413 

704 
702 
818 
607 
419 


2.214 

677 
633 
750 
580 
374 


364 

84 
107 
128 

87 
85 


2,578 

761 
740 
878 
667 
459 


52 

12 
2 
14 
13 
10 


2,630 

773 
742 
892 
680 
469 


2,158 

673 
644 
736 

577 
392 


1,030 
194 




7 


214 


<t 


7 


242 


" 


7 


203 


" 


7 


86 










5,826 


3,250 


3.014 


491 


3,505 


51 


3.556 


3,022 


939 


City . 


26,744 


13.477 


12.360 


2,007 


14,367 


443 


14.810 


12,009 


5.335 









:\T2 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Women's Voting Lists. 



Ward. 


Precinct. 


Nov. 

20, 

1918 


Revised 
Lists 

of 

July 

15, 

1919 


Added 
in Sept. 

Oct. 

and 

Nov. 

1919 


Dec. 
3, 
1919 


Voted 

Dec. 

23, 

1919 


Ward 1 


Precinct 1 

2 

3 

4 

Precinct 1 

2 

3 

Precinct 1 

2 

Precinct 1 

2 

Precinct 1 

2 

3 

Precinct 1 

2 

3 

Precinct 1 

2 

3 

4 

5 


52 
32 

18 
36 


45 
31 

18 
31 


8 

4 

13 

15 


53 
35 
31 
46 


33 


1 


17 


1 


22 


1 


40 






Ward 2 . . 


138 

5 

11 

6 


125 

5 

11 

5 


40 


165 

5 

11 

5 


112 


2 







2 














22 

123 
113 


21 

112 
107 




21 

119 
111 




Ward 3 


7 
4 


4 


3 


4 






Ward 4 


236 

50 
90 


219 

49 

87 


11 

4 
1 


230 

53 

88 


8 
,3 


4 


2 






Ward 5 


140 

178 
129 
173 


136 

159 
120 
127 


5 

22 

3 

33 


141 

181 
123 
160 


5 

g 


5 


^ 


5 






Ward 6 

6 

6 


480 

211 
66 

68 


406 

207 
61 
55 


58 

16 

2 

10 


464 

223 
63 
65 


17 

16 
1 
5 


Ward 7 


;345 

37 
74 
39 
14 
16 


323 

31 
64 
32 
13 
15 


28 

18 
6 
30 
30 
15 


351 

49 
70 
62 
43 
30 


22 

11 
6 


7 


8 


7 


K 


7 


10 








180 


155 


99 


254 


43 


City 


1,541 


1,385 


241 


1,626 


207 



CITY CLERK. 



070 
010 



ELECTIONS. 

The following is a statement of the votes cast, in the several 
wards of the city, for the candidates for the various offices, and on 
various questions, at the state election held November 4, 1919. 









Wards. 










Candidatk. Pa];ty. 


















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Total. 


GOVERNOR. 


















Calvin Coolidge Republican 
Charles B. Ernst Prohibition 
William A. King Socialist 
Richard H. Long Democratic 
Ingvar Paulsen Socialist Labor 
Blank 


684 
5 
6 

650 

5 

21 


300 
1 
7 

869 

2 

12 


883 
2 
7 

466 
5 
4 


828 
3 
7 

324 

3 

14 


1083 

3 

6 

614 

5 

10 


1,437 

8 

30 

644 

6 

33 


2,381 

6 

16 

584 

9 

26 


7,59b 
28 
79 

4,151 

35 

120 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR. 


















Charles J. Brandt Socialist 
Channing H. Cox Republican 
H. Edward Gordon Prohibition 
John F. J. Herbert Democratic 
Patrick Mulligan Socialist Labor 
Blank 


16 
690 

16 

599 

4 

46 


12 

279 

2 

845 

10 

43 


12 

856 

3 

468 

8 

20 


12 

828 

4 

298 

9 

28 


19 

1059 

9 

596 

8 

30 


39 
1,417 
10 
625 
14 
53 


30 
2,340 
23 
577 
14 
38 


140 

7,469 
67 

4,008 

67 

258 


SECRETARY. 


















Harry W. Bowman Prohibition 
James Hayes Socialist Labor 
Albert P. Langtry Republican 
Charles H. McGlue Democratic 
Herbert H. Thompson Socialist 
Blank 


26 
13 
669 
542 
33 
88 


10 

11 

270 

779 

15 

106 


25 

6 

848 

417 

14 

57 


26 
10 
831 
238 
10 
64 


31 

8 

1083 

510 

25 

64 


34 

18 

1,448 

516 

35 

107 


53 
22 
2,400 
412 
43 
92 


205 

8b 
7,549 
3.414 

175 

578 


TREASURER. 




• 














Fred J. Burrell Republican 
David Craig Socialist Labor 
Charles D. Fletcher Prohibition 
Louis Marcus Socialist 
Chandler M. Wood Democratic 
Blank 


689 

13 

30 

120 

531 

88 


284 

13 

21 

13 

746 

114 


736 

7 

22 

8 

535 

59 


743 

7 

24 

9 

351 

45 


947 
12 
39 
17 

637 
69 


1,350 
17 
32 
30 
638 
91 


2,104 
19 

68 

28 

708 

95 


6,853 

88 

236 

125 

4,146 
561 


AUDITOR. 


















Arthur J. B. Cartier Democratic 
Alonzo B. Cook Republican 
Oscar Kinsalas Socialist Labor 
Walter P. J. Skahan Socialist 
Henry J. D. Small Prohibition 
Blank 


485 

718 

12 

20 

16 

120 


766 
270 

8 
11 

8 

128 


431 

827 

7 

6 

12 

84 


241 

843 

6 

9 

13 

67 


521 

1064 

10 

17 

18 
91 


539 

1.425 

9 

30 

16 

139 


454 

2,362 

16 

33 

33 

124 


3,437 

7,509 

68 

126 

116 

753 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 


















J. Weston Allen Republican 
Morris I. Becker Socialist Labor 
Joseph A. Conry Democratic 
Conrad W. Crooker Prohibition 
Independent 
Progressive 
William R. Henry Socialist 
Blank 


670 

12 

532 

42 
23 
92 


257 
13 

784 

24 

9 

104 


838 

8 

429 

34 

8 
50 


811 

5 

253 

39 
12 
59 


1058 

9 

526 

45 
17 
66 


1,430 

14 

552 

49 
26 

87 


2.349 

18 
449 

87 
28 
91 


7,413 

79 

3,525 

320 
123 
549 



874 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Candidate. Party. 


Wards. 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Total. 


COUNCILLOR, 

FOURTH DISTRICT 


















George B. Wason Republican 

William V. Baro 

Blank 


822 
549 


367 

824 


911 
456 


889 
290 


1,182 

1 

538 


1,538 
620 


2.476 
546 


8.185 

1 

3.823 


SENATOR, 

THIRD MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 


















Arthur D. Healey Democratic 
Joseph O. Knox Republican 
Blank 


563 
725 

83 


836 

274 

81 


555 

767 

45 


288 

841 

50 


624 

1,034 

63 


784 

1,275 

99 


794 

2,090 

138 


4.444 

7.006 

559 


REPRESENTATIVES, 
23RD DISTRICT (3) 


















Charles M. Austin Republican 


731 
792 
719 
602 

1.269 




842 

821 

816 

494 

1 

1 

1 

1.125 


815 
812 
783 
313 

1 
S1.^ 


1,044 

1,079 

1,002 

700 

1,338 






3,432 


William Fleming Republican 








3,504 


Harvey E. Frost Republican 








3,320 


David J. Kelly Democratic 








2,109 


Charles L. Underbill 








1 


John M. Webster 








1 


Charles L. Underbill 








1 


Joseph F. Leahy 








1 


Blank 








4,545 


REPRESENTATIVES, 
24TH DISTRICT (3) 












Warren C. Daggett Republican 




315 
651 
254 
650 
662 
225 
816 








1,317 
479 

1,299 
535 
473 

1.311 

1,060 


2.159 


3.791 


Frank Lewis Hope Democratic 










465 1,595 


Wilbur F. Lewis Republican 










2.263 3.816 


Joseph Linhares Democratic 










478 1,663 


Robert R. Moody Democratic 










479 ! 1.614 


Arthur W. Robinson Republican 










2,107 13.643 


Blank ^^^ 










1,115 i 2.991 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER, 
MIDDLESEX COUNTY 


















Erson B. Barlow Republican 
Charles J. Barton Democratic 
Blank 


696 
528 
147 


254 

748 
189 


816 
444 
107 


824 
253 
102 


1,061 
542 
118 


1,410 
533 
215 


2,288 
503 
231 


7,349 
3,551 
1.109 


ASST. COUNTY COMMISSIONER. 
MIDDLESEX COUNTY 


















Frederic P. Barnes Republican 
H. Harding Hale , Republican 
Blank 


805 

651 

1.286 


381 

301 

1.700 


900 

718 

1,116 


869 
687 
802 


1.142 

975 

1.325 


1,500 
1.230 
1.586 


12.376 
1.944 
1.724 


7.973 
6.506 
9.539 



CITY CLERK. 



375 



Candidate. 



Party 



DISTRICT' ATTORNEY. 

William E. Russell Democratic 
Nathan A. Tufts Republican 
Blank 

"SHALL THE REARRANGEMENT 
OF THE CONSTITUTION OF THE 
COMMONWEALTH, SUBMITTED 
BY THE CONSTITUTIONAL CON- 
VENTION, BE APPROVED AND 
RATIFIED?" 

Number of "YES" votes 
Number of "NO" votes 
Blank 

SHALL AN ACT PASSED BY 
THE GENERAL COURT IN THE 
YEAR NINETEEN HUNDRED 
AND NINETEEN, ENTITLED "AN 
ACT RELATIVE TO THE ESTAB- 
LISHMENT AND MAINTENANCE 
OF CONTINUATION SCHOOLS 
AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
FOR EMPLOYED MINORS," BE 
ACCEPTED? 

Number of "YES" votes 
Number of "NO" votes 
Blank 

SHALL CHAPTER 116, GENERAL 
ACTS OF 1919. APPROVED BY 
THE GENERAL COURT WITH- 
OUT DIVISION, WHICH PRO- 
VIDES THAT DEPOSITS IN SAV- 
INGS BANKS AND SAVINGS DE- 
PARTMENTS OF TRUST COM- 
PANIES MAY BE PLACED ON 
INTEREST ONCE A MONTH AND 
NOT OFTENER; THAT DIVI- 
DENDS ON SUCH DEPOSITS MAY 
BE DECLARED SEMI-ANNUAL- 
LY AND NOT OFTENER, AND 
THAT INTEREST SHALL NOT 
BE PAID ON ANY SUCH DEPOS- 
ITS WITHDRAWN BETWEEN 
DIVIDEND DAYS, BE AP- 
PROVED? 

Number of "YES" votes 
Number of "NO" votes 
Blank 

"SHALL .AN ACT PASSED BY 
THE GENERAL COURT IN THE 
YEAR NINETEEN HUNDRED 
AND NINETEEN, ENTITLED 'AN 
ACT TO PROVIDE FOR BIENNI- 
AL ELECTIONS IN THE CITY OF 
SOMERVILLE,' BE ACCEPT- 
ED?" 

Number of "YES" votes 
Number of "NO" votes 
Blank 



Wards, 



533 
753 

85 



756 
153 
462 



865 
145 
361 



663 
348 
360 



771 
322 

98 



604 
127 
460 



711 
120 
360 



547 
282 
362 



679 
282 
410 



541 
256 
384 



473 

835 
59 



787 
161 
419 



850 
172 
345 



685 
354 
328 



282 

840 

57 



675 
141 
363 



768 
131 
280 



571 
326 
282 



729 
324 
314 



550 

1091 

80 



993 
229 
499 



1119 
211 
391 



Total. 



615 

1442 

101 



1257 
289 
612 



1420 
261 

477 



854 
502 
365 



638 
255 

286 



945 

388 
388 



560 

2360 

102 



1856 
358 

808 



3,784 

7,643 

582 



6,928 
1,458 
3,623 



2069 
312 
641 



7,802 
1,352 
2,855 



1132 1501 
545 935 
481 586 



1213 
461 

484 



5,953 
3,292 
2,764 



1715 
642 
665 



6,460 
2,618 
2.931 



376 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 




CITY CLERK. 



377 



The following is a statement of the votes cast in the several 
wards of the city for the candidates for the various offices, and on 
the question' of granting licenses for the sale of intoxicating li- 
quors in this city, at the city election held December 23, 1919 : — 



Candidate. 



Party. 



Wards. 



MAYOR 

Charles W. Eldridge Republican 
John A. Kyte Democratic 

Blank 



ALDERMAN- AT-LARGE, 
WARD 1. 

James J. Shay Republican 

Blank 



ALDERMAN- AT-LARGE, 
WARD 2. 

Robert C. Harris Republican 
William E. Musgrave Independent 
Blank 



ALDERMAN- AT-LARGE, 
WARD 3. 

George A. Berry Republican 

Blank 



ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, 
WARD 4. 

Richard L. Rice Republican 

Blank 



ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, 
WARD 5. 

William J. Bell Republican 

Blank 



ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, 
WARD 6. 

Enoch B. Robertson Republican 
Blank 



ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE. 
WARD 7 

Hiram N. Dearborn Republican 
Blank 



708 

312 

66 



723 
363 



552 
194 
340 



579 
507 



552 
534 



554 
532 



549 
537 



550 
536 



291 

354 

96 



216 
525 



320 
315 
106 



213 

528 



202 
539 



203 
538 



207 
534 



192 
549 



405 
65 

27 



347 
150 



386 
111 



352 
145 



357 
140 



361 
136 



355 
142 



358 
28 
10 



334 
62 



223 266 

231 

43 42 



328 
68 



364 
32 



337 
59 



327 
69 



325 
71 



553 

77 
16 



479 
167 



384 

166 

96 



493 
153 



493 
153 



548 
98 



488 
158 



480 
166 



835 

143 

52 



733 
297 



611 
256 
163 



735 
295 



716 
314 



717 
313 



789 
241 



719 
311 



7 iTotal. 



845 3,995 
65 I 1,044 
29 296 



743 
196 



3,575 
1,760 



605 j 2,961 

228 i 1.478 
106 I 896 



760 
179 



752 
187 



736 
203 



757 
182 



3,494 
1,841 



3,431 
1.904 



3,452 

1,883 



3,478 
1,857 



806 3.427 
133 1,908 






ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Candidate. Party. 


Wards. 






1 


2 3 4 

1 


5 


6 i 7 


Total. 


WARD ALDERMAN (2) WARD 1. 
William F. Burns Democratic 


513 
450 
455 
120 
421 
213 














513 


James J. Corbett Democratic 














450 


Lyman A. Hodgdon Republican 
Peter J. Kelly Independent 
John Lingard Republican 
Blank 














455 










! 


120- 










1 


421 














213 


WARD ALDERMAN (2) WARD 2. 
Peter F. Donnelly Independent 


400 
401 
354 

327 












400 


Joseph A. Haley Democratic 














401 


Alfred J. Toomey Democratic 














354 


Blank 














327 


WARD ALDERMAN (2) WARD 3. 
William C. Abbott Republican 




370 
343 

1 
280 










370 


Charles E. Nichols, Jr. Republican 














343 


John M. Nangle 














1 


Blank 












280 


WARD ALDERMAN (2) WARD 4. 
Waldo D. Phelps Republican 






345 
332 
115 








345 


John S. Smith, Jr. Republican 














332 


Blank 














115 


WARD ALrDERMAN (2) WARD 5. 
Fred Allen Republican 








480 
152 
461 
199 






480 


Patrick H. Ryan Democratic 














152 


Francis W. K. Smith Republican 














461 


Blank 






i 






199 


WARD ALDERMAN (2) WARD 6. 
Almon F. Heald Republican 










585 




585 


John E. Locatelli Republican 












586 
528 
361 




586 


Harry J. Norton Independent 














528 


Blank 














361 


WARD ALDERMAN (2) WARD 7. 

Emerson J. Coldwell Republican 
Arthur F. Mason Republican 
Blank" 














790 
780 
308 


790 














780 














308 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE, WARD 1. 
Winnifred P. Davis Republican 


522 
610 
622 
469 
173 












522 


Francis J. Fitzpatrick Democratic 














610 


William T. McCarthy Democratic 














622 


James Joseph Rudd Republican 














469 


Blank 












173 






1 1 









CITY CLERK. 



379 



Candidate. Party. 


Wards. 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Total 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE, WARD 2. 
Daniel H. Bradley Democratic 




518 

474 
490 












518 


Christopher Muldoon, 

Jr. Democratic 














474 


Blank 














490 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE, WARD 3. 
Charles W. Boyer Republican 




353 
360 
297 










353 


Oscar W. Codding Republican 














360 


Blank 














297 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE, WARD 4. 
Frank M. Hawes Republican 






338 
333 
131 








« 
338 


Edward I. Tripp Republican 














333 


Blank 














131 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE, WARD 5. 
Harry M. Stoodley Republican 








521 
495 
310 






521 


Minnie S. Turner Republican 














495 


Blank 














310 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE, WARD 6. 

Walter I. Chapman Republican 
William M. Morrison Republican 
Blank 










778 
776 
550 




778 














776 














550 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE, WARD 7. 
Herbert Cholerton Republican 












809 

773 

1 

381 

350 
565 

24 


809 


Paul O. Curtis Republican 














773 


Prank E, Porter 














1 


Blank 














381 


SHALL LICENSES BE GRANTED 
FOR THE SALE OF INTOXICAT- 
ING LIQUORS IN THIS CITY? 

Number of "YES" votes 
Number of "NO" votes 
Blank 


645 

371 

70 


561 

101 

79 


254 

228 
15 


151 

130 

15 


310 

326 

10 


506 
476 

48 


2,777 

2,297 

261 



380 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Liquor License Question. 

The following is a statement of the votes, during the sev- 
eral years of its submission to the people, on the question of 
granting licenses for the sale of intoxicating liquors, in this 
city, together with the number of registered voters and the esti- 
mated population for each year: — 



Year. 


Yes. 


No. 


Bl-AXK. 


Registered 
Voters. 


Estimated 
Population. 


1881 


979 


1,222 




3,678 


26,000 


1882 


627 


1,159 




3,778- 


26,500 


1883 


767 


1,343. 




4,407 


27,000 


1884 


806 


1,709 




4,470 


28,000 


1885 


428 


1,604 




3,969 


*29,992 


•1886 * 


214 


1,321 




4,089 


32,000 


1887 


555 


2,427 




4,574 


34,000 


1888 


744 


2,456 




5,399 


36,000 


1889 


635 


1,706 


335 


5,286 


39,000 


1890 


999 


2,282 


409 


5,556 


*40,117 


1891 


1,054 


2,598 


279 . 


5,938 


43,000 


1892 


1,427 


3,288 » 


347 


7,587 


46,000 


1893 


1,547 


2,654 


218 


7,943 


48,000 


1894 ■ 


1,098 


2,869 


246 


8,0d7 


50,000 


1895 


1,854 


4,708 


459 


8,410 


*52,200 


1896 


1,466 


3,680 


332 


9,379 


54,000 


1897 


1,626 


3,815 


486 


8,925 


56,000 


1898 


1,595 


3,501 


486 


8,657 


57,500 


1899 


1,892 


3,340 


374 


8,838 


(50,000 


1900 


1,660 


3,427 


321 


9,620 


*61,643 


1901 


1,579 


3,295 


374 


9,499 


63,500 


1902 


1,645 


3,242 


360 


10,100 


65,000 


1903 


2,248 


4,410 


550 


11,346 


67,000 


1904 


2,022 


4,338 


447 


11,682 


69,500 


1905 


2,483 


4,660 


531 


11,340 


*69,272 


1906 


2,193 


5,204 


582 


11,571 


70,000 


1907 


1,735 


4,591 


459 


11,558 


74,000 


1908 


1,780 


4,760 


491 


12,777 


75,500 


1909 


1,830 


4,601 


530 


12,479 


75,500 


1910 


1,544 


3,968 


365 


12,522 


*77,236 


1911 


2,193 


4,841 


492 


13,226 


80,000 


1912 


2,421 


6,182 


546 


13,854 


81,000 


1913 


2,348 


6,431 


550 


13,417 


, 82,000 


1914 


2,178 


5,535 


488 


13,404 


85,000 


1915 


1,705 


5,262 


379 


13,805 


*86,854 


1916 


1,100 


4,158 


271 


14,500 


88,000 


1917 


1,291 


3,457 


232 


13,826 


90,000 


1918 


690 


1,935 


161 


13,477 


90,500 


1919 


2,777 


2,297 


261 


14,810 


91,000 



♦Census. 



CITY CLERK. 381 



ORDINANCES. 

Somerville, January 1, 1920. 

The following ordinances have been adopted since the print- 
ing of the annual reports for the year 1918 : — r 

Ordinance No. 88 
An Ordinance Relative to the Police Department. 

Be it ordained hij tJie Board of Aldermen of the Citi/ of Somerville, a^^t 
folloics: — 

Section 1. The permanent members and patrol drivers of thfi 
police department shall be excused from duty for one day out of every 
eight days without loss of pay. The time and the manner of excusing 
them from duty shall be determined by the chief of police. Allowances 
otherwise provided for of time off for vacation, injury, sickness or other 
cause, shall not be affected by the provisions of this ordinance. A mem- 
ber so excused shall be exempt from duty and from attendance at a 
police station or other place, but otherwise shall be subject to all laws, 
rules and regulations relating to members of the department. 

Section 2. The chief of police shall have authority, whenever in his 
judgment public emergency or any unusual demand for the services of 
the police requires, to prevent any such member or driver from taking 
the day off herein provided for at the time when he is entitled thereto 
or at the time assigned therefor, provided, however, that such day 
off shall be granted him as soon thereafter as is practicable in the judg- 
ment of the chief of police. In no case shall the number of such days 
off be less than forty-five in each entire calendar year. 

Section 3. This ordinance shall take effect October 1, 1919. 

Appronjed July it , IQIQ. 



Ordinance No. 89 

An Ordinance Fixing License Fee for Purchase and Sale of Second- 
Hand Motor Vehicles and Parts Thereof. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville, as 
follotcs: — 

Section 1. The fee for each class of license provided for by Chap- 
ter 259 of the General Acts of the Legislature of Massachusetts for 
the Year 1919 entitled "An Act to Regulate the Purchase and Sale of 
Second-Hand Motor Vehicles and Parts Thereof" is hereby fixed at the 
sum of ten dollars. 

iSection 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Appro'ved September 26, IQIQ, 



382 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Ordinance No. 90 
An Ordinance Amending Ordinance Relative to the Police Department. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville, as 
follows: — 

'Seotion 1. Chapter XIX of the Revised Ordinances of 1911 as amend-, 
ed by Ordinance No. 57 is hereby further amended by striking out sec- 
tion 1 and inserting in place thereof the following: Section 1. The 
police department shall consist of a chief of police, a captain, six 
lieutenants (two of whom shall be inspectors), six sergeants, such num- 
ber of patrolmen as the board of aldermen may from time to time deter- 
mine, and a reserve force of ten men. They shall take rank in the order 
in which they are named. 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Appro'ved December 75, IQIQ. 

Frederic W. Cook, 

City Clerk, 



CITY CLERK. 



383 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1919. 



Mayor. 
Charles W. Eldbidge, 47 Highland Road. 

Board of Aldermen. 

President, Enoch B. Robertson. 
Yice-President, Chables H. Manzeb. 



WABD one. 

Justin P. Nowell, Alderman-at-large . 
Ralph H. Hosmer .... 
James J. Shay ..... 

WARD TWO. 

James J. Comfort, Alderman-at-large . 
Peter F. Donnelly .... 
Robert C. Harris ..... 



1 Webster street 
51 Mt. Vernon street 
68 Mt. Pleasant court 



9 Hammond street 

11 Allen street 

12 Dimick street 



WARD three. 



John M. Webster, Alderman-at-large 
William C. Abbott 
Creorge A. Berry 



76 Boston street 

73 Avon street 

60 Prescott street 



ward foub. 

Charles H. Manzer, Alderman-at-large . 
Richard L. Rice ..... 
Walter H. Snow 



60 Fellsway West 
2961/2 Broadway 
42 Derby street 



WARD FIV^. 



William J. Bell, Alderman-at-large 

Fred Allen 

Alfred M. Pride .... 



380 Medford street 
121 Central street 
150 Hudson street 



WARD six. 

Enoch B. Robertson, Alderman-at-large 
Almon F. Heald ..... 
John E. Locatelli .... 



87 Highland road 
83 Belmont street 
78 Belmont street 



WARD SEVEN. 

Eugene M. Carman, Alderman-at-large 
Hiram N. Dearborn .... 
Wilbur F. Lewis ..... 



102 College avenue 

22 Lovell street 

51 Foskett street 



City Clerk — Frederic W. Cook. 

Assistant City Clerk — Jason M. Carson. 
City Messenger — Fred E. Hanley. 



384 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Standing Committees of the Board of Aldermen. 

Electric Lines and Lights — Aldermen Shay, Carman, Comfort, 
Webster and Allen. 

Finance — The President, Aldermen Rice, Dearborn, Donnelly, Hos- 
mer. Berry and Bell. 

Legislative Matters — Aldermen Manzer, Webster, Bell, Comfort, 
and Nowell. 

Licenses and Permits — Aldermen Harris, Dearborn, Rice, Heald, 
Shay, Abbott and Pride. 

Public Property — Aldermen Bell, Lewis, Locatelli, Nowell and 
Snow. 

Public Safety — Aldermen Carman, Manzer, Donnelly, Shay and 
Heald. 

Public Service — Aldermen Dearborn, Pride, Hosmer, Locatelli, 
Harris, Berry and Snow. 

Pltblic Works — Aldermen Lewis, Manzer, Locatelli, Harris, Hos- 
mer, Allen and Abbott. 

School Committee. 

Chairman — Herbert Cholerton. 
Tice-Cliairman — Daniel H. Bradley. 

Charles W. Eldridge, Mayor (ex-ofRcio), 47 Highland Road. 
Enoch B. Robertson, President Board of Aldermen (ex-ofRcio), 87 

Highland Road. 

WARD ONE. 

WiNNiFRED P. Da\t[s (electcd 1918), 125 Pearl street. 
James J. Rudd (elected 1917), 46 Franklin street. 

WARD two. 

Daniel H. Bradley (elected 1917), 19 Concord avenue. 
Christopher J. Muldoon, Jr., (elected 1918), 88 Concord avenue. 

WARD three. 

Oscar W. Codding (elected 1918), 21 Pleasant avenue. 
Alfred L. West (elected 1917), 69 Avon street. 

w^ard four. 
Frank H. Holmes (elected 1918), 22 Walter street. 
Edgar F. Sew all (elected 1918, to fill vacancy), 281 Broadway. 

ward five. 

Blanche E. Herbert (elected 1918; resigned October 27 1919), 56 Dart- 
mouth street. 
Harry M. Stoodley (elected 1917), 283 Highland avenue. 

ward six. 

Paul S. Burns (elected 1918, to fill vacancy), 191 Summer street. 
William M. Morrison (elected 1918), 97 Rogers avenue. 

ward seven. 
Herbert Cholerton (elected 1918), 94 College avenue. 
Frank E. Porter (elected 1917), 43 Ossipee road. 

Superintendent and Secretary- — Charles S. Clark. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1919. 385 



Assessors. 

Fred E, Warren, Chairman (term expires 1920), 

WiNSOR L. Snow (term expires 1921). 

Harry Van Iderstine (term expires 1920). 

J. Robert Feneix)n (term expires 1919). 

David B. Armstrong (term expires 1921). 



Assistant Assessors. 

Pred B. Clapp. John M. Nangle. 

John S. McGowan. Leonard C. Spinney. 

Lawrence J. Ward, Samuel C. Wiswall. 



Board of Health. 

Robert M. Lavender, Chairman (term expires 1920). 

Warren C. Blair (term expires 1920). 

John E. Gillis, M. D., (term expires 1921). 

Clerk — Laurence S. Howard. 

Agent — George I. Canfield. 

Acting Medical Inspector — Ralph F. Hodgdon, M. D. 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions — Charles M. Berry. 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar — Herbert E, Bowman. 



Overseers of the Poor. 

Fred E. Durgin, Chairman (term expires 1920) 

Henry F. Curtis (term expires 1922). 

Michael Coll (term expires 1921). 

Agent — William E. Copithorne. 

Warden City Home — J. Foster Colquhoun. 

Matron City Home — Catherine Colquhoun. 



Planning Board. 

William F. Riley, Chairman (term expires 1921) 

David J. Kelley, Secretary (term expires 1924). 

Harrison L. Evans, (term expires 1920). 

Paul R. Valentine, (term expires 1922). 

George J. Rauh, (term expires 1923). *• 



Registrars of Voters. 

EtowiN D. Sibley, Chairman (term expires 1921). 

Douglass B. Foster (term expires 1920). 

Charles Leo Shea (term expires 1919). 

Frederic W. Cook, City Clerk. 



386 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Public Library Trustees. 

Thomas M. Durell, Chairman (term expires 1922) 

J. Frank Wellington (term expires 1920.) 

FREDERICK W. Parker (term expires 1921). 

William L. Barber (term expires 1922). 

Charles L#. Notes (term expires 1920). 

Herbert E. Buffum (term expires 1920). 

Giles W. Bryant (term expires 1921). 

David H. Fulton (term expires 1921). 

Librarian and Secretary — George H. Evans. 

Recreation and Playground Commission. 

Charles S. Clark, Chairman (term expires 1921). 
George L, Dudley, Secretary (term expires 1920). 

Francis P. Garland (term expires 1920). 
Ernest W. Bailey (term expires 1920). 

John F. Colquhoun (term expires 1920). 

Frances M. Weeks (term expires 1921). 

Elizabeth Mongan (term expires 1921). 

City Clerk. 

Frederic W. Cook. 
Assistant City Clerk — Jason M. Carson. 

City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 
Joseph S. Pike. 

City Messenger. 
Fred E. Hanlet. 

Mayor's Secretary. 
Leon M. Conwell. 

City Solicitor. 
Frank W. Kaan. 

City Auditor. 
Howard E. Wemyss. 

City Engineer. 
Ernest W. Bailey. 

Commissioner of Streets. 
Asa B. Pritchard. 

Commissioner of Public Buildings and Inspector of Buildings. 

George L. Dudley. 

Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights. 
Walter I. Fuller. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1919. 387 

Water Commissioner. 
Feank E. Merrill. 

Superintendent of Sanitary Department. 
Edgar T. Mayhew. 

Clerk of Committees. 
Richard A. Keyes. 

Ciiief of Police. 
Charles A. Kendall. 

Chief Engineer of the Fire Department. 

Sewall M. Rich. 

City Physician. 
C. Clarke Towle, M. D. 

Inspector of Plumbing. 
Duncan C. Greene. 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar. 
Herbert E. Bowman. 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions. 
Charles M. Berry. 

Inspector of Petroleum. 
Sewall M. Rich. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

John H. Dusseault. 
Deputy Sealer — Benjamin S. Abbott. 

Fence Viewers. 

Charles M. Berry, 
Howard Lowell, 

Agent of Military and State Aid and Soldiers' Relief and Burial Agent. 

John H. Dusseault, 

Constables. 

Maurice F. Ahearn. Fred E. Hanley. 

Charles M. Austin. James M. Harmon. 

Charles W. F. Bennett. Fred W. Jackson. 

George H. Carleton. Harry E. Jackson. 

Eugene A. Carter. Charles A. Kendall. 

WiNSLOw W. Coffin. Michael T. Kennedy. 

William E. Copithorne. Elbridge G. Lavender. 

Albion B. Crocker. Edward E. Marsh. 

Warren C. Daggett. Louis A. Morris. 

Thomas Damery. John A. Ray. 

Charles L. Ellis. John F. Scannell. 

Arthur L. Gilman. Charles E. Woodman. 



INDEX. 



City Auditor, Report of . 

Balance Sheet ..... 
Cash Statement ..... 
Taxes — Special Assessments 
Departmental Bills .... 
Water Department Accounts 
Statement of Esitimated Revenue . 
Appropriations ..... 
Service Transfers .... 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts . 
County of Middlesex .... 
Revenue and Expenses 
Temporary Loans .... 

Funded Debt . . . . 
Maturities on Funded Debt . 
Interest Requirements on Funded Debt 
Borrowing Capacity .... 
Abatements, Refunds, State Income Tax, Etc 
Overlay Accounts .... 

Excess and Deficiency Account . 
Receipts and Expenditures, Classification of 
Schedule of Public Property 



13 
14 
16 
18 
19 
20 
21 
24 
32 
3S 
33 
34 
35 
36 
39-40 
39-40 
41 
42 
44 
45 
45 
76 



City Clerk, Report of . 

Receipts ..... 
Payments ..... 
Licenses and Permits . 

Births 

Marriages ..... 

Deaths . . 

Assessed Polls and Registered Voters 

Women's Voting Lists . 

FJleotions ..... 

Liquor License Question 

Ordinances .... 



365 
365 
307 
368 
368 
369 
36r' 
371 
37? 
373 
380 
381 



City Engineer, Report of . . . . . . 

Engineering Department, Classification of Expenses 
Streets Accepted as Public Ways in 1919 . 

Street Bounds Set In 1919 

Table of Street Construction .... 

Sewer Division, Statement of Expenses 

Storm Drains ....... 

Maintenance Account ...... 

Parks and Playgrounds Statement of Expenses, Main 
tenance ....... 

Table of Streets 



263 
263 
265 
266 
267 
270 

y72 

273 

275 
279 



INDEX. 



389 



City Government and Officers for 1919 . 

City Solicitor, Report of . 

City Treasurer and CoUeictor of Taxes, Report of 
Condensed Casih Statement .... 
Payments on Account of Debt . 
Grade Crossing Debt ..... 
Treasury Department ..... 



383 

79 
80 
82 
82 
83 



Commissioner of Public Buildings (see Public Buildings 
Commissioner) ....... 



304 



Commissioner of Streeits (see Street Commissioner) . 
Commissioner of Water (see Water Commissioner) . 
Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights, Report of 

Inspection of Wiring in Buildings 

Fire Alarm System . ^. . . . . 

Police Signal System .'..... 

Supervision of Poles and Wires on the Streets . 

Street Lighting . . . . . . . 

Recommendations ...... 

Conclusion ........ 



9QO 

ljO -^ 

319 
31'^. 
313 
314 
315 
315 
31G 
31^> 
316 



Fire Department, Chief of, Report of 
Alarms of Fire . 
List of Probable Causes 
Manual Force 
Apparatus . 
Horses 
Hose 
(Resume 

Recommendations 
Conclusion . 



Hoalth, Board of, Report of 
Organization, Officers, etc. 
Nuisances . 
Permits and Licenses 
Stables 

Board of Infants . 
Deaths 

Mortality Statistics 
Diseases Dangerous to Public Health 
Specimens and Supplies 
Medical Inspedtion of Schools . 
Bacteriologioal Department . 
Und/ertakera .... 
Examination of Plumbers 
Health Nurses, Report of . 
Medical Inspection, Report of . 
Inspector of Animals and Provisions 
Inspector of Milk and Vinegar and Acting Bacteriologist 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions, Report of . 
Inspector of Buildings (see Public Buildings Comimissioner) 



343 
342 
342 
345 
345 
34!) 
345 
345) 
348 
349 

214 
214 
215 
215 
216 
217 
217-220-22=1 
218-23-S 
223 
223 
224 
226 
226 
226 
226-228 
231 
232 
235 

232 
304 



390 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Inspector of Milk and Vinegar, and Acting Bacteriologist, 
Report of the 
Pasiteurization 
Infantile Mortality 
Diagnostic Examinations 
Diphtheriaj 
Tuberculosis 
Typhoid .... 

City Physician, Report of . 

Law Department, Report of 

Mayor's Inaugural Address 

Taxes .... 

Medical Inspection, Report of . 
Contagious Disease Hospital 

Ordinances .... 

Overseers of the Poor, Report of 

Members of the Boiard, Committees, Officers, etc. 
Report of General Agent . 
Full Support ..... 

Partial Support ..... 
Aid Under 1913 Law (Mothers' Aid) . 
Reimbursements ..... 
Somerville Hospital .... 
Population and Grosis Expenditures . 
Overseers of the Poor Since 1885 . 
Recapitulation ..... 
City Home, Report of Warden 
City Physician, Report of . 

Planning Board, Report of . 

Police, Chief of. Report of . 

Arrests ...... 

Crimes and Offenses Against the Person 

Crimes and Offenses Against Property 

Crimes and Offenses Against Public Order 

Recapitulation 

Roster of Department . 

Changes in the Force . 

Police Matron, Report of 

Conclusion . 

Poor Department (see Overseers of the Poor) 
Population ...... 

Public Buildings (:!ommissioner. Report of 

Inspection of Buildings 

Elevators ..... 

School Buildings .... 

Municipal Buildings 

Librariesi ..... 

Water, Highway and Refuse Buildings 

Hospital Buildings 

City Home Buildings . 



235 
238 
238 
240 
240 
240 
241 

249 
364 

3 

9 

231 
231 

381 

242 
242 
244 
244 
244 
244 
245 
245 
246 
247 
247 
248 
240 

339 

350 
350 
350 
351 
351 
352 
357 
35S 
360 
361 

242 
129-246-380 
30'] 
304 
307 
307 
30r' 
309 
310 
310 
310 



INDEX. 



391 



Police Buildings. 
Bath House . 
Park Buildings 
In General . 



311 
311 
311 
312 



Public Grounds (City Engineer) ...... 263 

Public Library 202 

Board of Trustees and Officers ..... 20:' 

Organizajtion of Library and Staff Personnel . . 203 

Report of Trustees . . . . . . . 206 

jRieport of Librarian 207 

Statistics 211 

Recreation and Playground Commission, Report of . . 250 

Director of Playgrounds, Report of . . . . 252 

Conditions Resulting From the War .... 252 

Grounds 252 

Supervision ........ 253 

Meetings 253 

Exhibitions . . . . . . . . . 253 

Handwork ......... 254 

Games ......... 251 

Baseball ......... 255 

Dancing ...... ^ . . 255 

Outings ......... 255 

Evening Supervision ....... 256 

Recommendations ....... 256 

Conclusion ......... 257 

Garden Supervisor, Report of .... . 258 

School Garden 261 

Crops Gathered and their Value ..... 262 

Sanitary Department, Report of . . . . . . 317 

Collection of Ashes and Paper . . . . . 317 

Departmental Revenue . . . . . .- 317 

School Department ........ 84 

Accommodations ....... 89 

Americanization ....... 100 

Appendix, Contents of, ...... 128 

College Admission 102-118 

Cost of Schools 94 

Dental Dispensary ....... 126 

. Elementary Schools ....... 94 

Gardens, Canning Clubs, Poultry Clubs . . . 116-117 

Graduates — High School 160 

Junior High Schools . . . . 163 

Vocational Schools 173 

High School 93-101-118-129 

High School Athletic Association ..... 125 

Increase of Salaries ....... 88 

In Memoriam ........ 127 

Junior High Sohoods 92-105 

New Legislation, Continuation Schools and Retarded 

Children 99 

OrganizaJtion and Activities of the Schools . . . 188 



392 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Report of Superintendent of Schools . 

Report of Ajsisistant Superintendent of Schools 
Report of Head Mtoter of the High School 
Report of Principal of Vocational School for Boys 
Report of Garden Supervisor 

School Committee, 1919 

School Comimittee, 1920 

School Nurses .... 

iSomerVille Te'adhers' Assiociation 

Somerville Teachers' Club . 

Teachers in Service . 

Vocational School for Boys . 

Vocational School for Girls . 

Sealer of Weigihts and Measures, Report of 
Sewers (see City Engineer) . . 

Street Commissioner, Report of . 
Highway Maintenance . 
Snow and Ice .... 
Underground Wires 
Crushed Stone . . . ' . 
Bridges ..... 

iSteiam iRollers .... 
Sidewalks Maintenance 
Street Sprinkling * . . . 
Street Cleaning .... 
Supresision of Moths . 
Shade Trees .... 

Highways Construction, New Streets 
Streets Constructed in 1919 . 
Sidewalks Constructed 

Highways Construction, Permanent Pavement 
Reconstruction and Resurfacing 
Miscellaneous 

Labor ..... 
Reimbursements . 

Support of Poor Department (see Overseers of the Poor) 
Water Commi&sioner, Report of . 

Revenue and Expenditures . 

Cost of Water Works . 

Water Debt .... 

Water Works Income and Distribution 

Water Distribution System, Construction 

Hydrants, Gates, etc., . 

Water Services .... 

Water Meters .... 

iSumimary of Pipes and Eixtures . 

Water Assessments and Consumption 

Construction, Maintenance, Operation 

Labor ..... 

Pensions ..... 

War Service Men 

Improvements .... 

Street Mains, Gates, Hydrants, etc., 1919 

Summary of tStatisitics 

Financial Statistics 



87 

105 

101 

113 

115 

85 

176 

Insert 

123 

124 

177 

94-113-12S 

94-128 

362 

270 

292 
292 
293 
293 
293 
293 
293 
293 
294 
294 
295 
295 
295 
297 
298 
300 
300 
302 
. 302 
303 

242 
319 
321 
323 
323 
323 
323 
325 
325 
326 
328 
328 
330 
331 
331 
332 
332 
333 
337 
338